PICRYL
PICRYLThe World's Largest Public Domain Source
  • homeHome
  • searchSearch
  • photo_albumStories
  • collectionsCollections
  • infoAbout
  • star_rateUpgrade
  • account_boxLogin

A young soldier of the armored forces holds and sights his Garand rifle like an old timer, Fort Knox, Ky. He likes the piece for its fine firing qualities and its rugged, dependable mechanism. Infantryman with halftrack

Halftrack infantryman with Garand rifle, Ft. Knox, Ky.

A young soldier of the armored forces holds and sights his Garand rifle like an old timer, Fort Knox, Ky. He likes the piece for its fine firing qualities and its rugged, dependable mechanism. Infantryman with halftrack

Infantryman with halftrack, a young soldier of the armed forces, holds and sights his Garand rifle like an old timer, Fort Knox, Ky. He likes the piece for its fine firing qualities and its rugged, dependable mechanism.

Halftrack infantryman with Garand rifle, Ft. Knox, Ky.

Infantryman with halftrack, a young soldier of the armed forces, holds and sights his Garand rifle like an old timer, Fort Knox, Ky. He likes the piece for its fine firing qualities and its rugged, dependable mechanism.

Tough steel for a tough job. It takes tough steel to stand up in a Garand rifle. Here workmen are testing the hardness of steel at an eastern armory, a center of war work

The man behind the gun. John C. Garand, inventor of the semi-automatic rifle now being turned out in large quantities under the war program, looks over one of the guns

New Army helmet. Corporal French L. Vineyard, Company M, 12th Infantry, wearing a new Army helmet. Corporal Vineyard is wearing the combat pack and cartridge belt and is equipped with a Garand rifle with bayonet affixed

New Army helmet. Corporal French L. Vineyard, Company M, 12th Infantry, wearing a new Army helmet. Corporal Vineyard is wearing the combat pack and cartridge belt and is equipped with a Garand rifle with bayonet affixed

Springfield, Massachusetts. John C. Garand, inventor of the Garand rifle, pointing out some of the features of the rifle to Major General Charles M. Wesson during the general's visit to the Springfield arsenal. At right is Brigadier General Gilbert H. Stewart, commanding officer of the arsenal

New Army helmet. Corporal French L. Vineyard, Company M, 12th Infantry, wearing a new Army helmet. Corporal Vineyard is wearing the combat pack and cartridge belt and is equipped with a Garand rifle with bayonet affixed

New Army helmet. Corporal French L. Vineyard, Company M, 12th Infantry, wearing a new Army helmet. Corporal Vineyard is wearing the combat pack and cartridge belt and is equipped with a Garand rifle

New Army helmet. Corporal French L. Vineyard, Company M, 12th Infantry, wearing a new Army helmet. Corporal Vineyard is wearing the combat pack and cartridge belt and is equipped with a Garand rifle with bayonet affixed

Fort Knox. Garand rifle. A young soldier of the armored forces, in training at Fort Knox, Kentucky, holds and sights his Garand rifle like an old timer. He likes the piece for its fine firing qualities and its rugged, dependable mechanism

Garand rifle

Making sure. A workman inspecting bore of a complete barrel for a Garand rifle, the new infantry weapon used in the war program

Garand rifle

Garand rifle

Fort Knox. Garand rifle. A young soldier of the armored forces, in training at Fort Knox, Kentucky, holds and sights his Garand rifle like an old timer. He likes the piece for its fine firing qualities and its rugged, dependable mechanism

Garand rifle

Fort Knox. Garand rifle. A young soldier of the armored forces, in training at Fort Knox, Kentucky, holds and sights his Garand rifle like an old timer. He likes the piece for its fine firing qualities and its rugged, dependable mechanism

Fort Knox. Garand rifle. A young soldier of the armored forces, in training at Fort Knox, Kentucky, holds and sights his Garand rifle like an old timer. He likes the piece for its fine firing qualities and its rugged, dependable mechanism

It has to be right. Gauging the diameter of the barrel of a Garand rifle following grinding. An eastern armory is turning out these rifles for the war program

Garand rifle

Fort Knox. Garand rifle. An American "ace in the hole" in this global war is our ability to furnish an unbearable combination of good men and good weapon. This infantry man, in training a Fort Knox, Kentucky, has learned that his M-1 (Garand) rifle is a weapon without peer. He can be depended on to perform notable with it

Fort Knox. Garand rifle. A young soldier of the armored forces, in training at Fort Knox, Kentucky, holds and sights his Garand rifle like an old timer. He likes the piece for its fine firing qualities and its rugged, dependable mechanism

New River, North Carolina. Marine infantry. The Garand rifle [not shown here] does some of its best work in the hands of a hard, capable leatherneck. This Marine, in training at New River, North Carolina, knows how to make use of all the fighting advantages it offers. Marine srtg barracks, New River, North Carolina

[Factory worker testing a rifle] Battle Begins With Your Job. Do It Right.

Helmet and Garand rifle

Fort Knox. Machine guns. An American "ace in the hole" in this global war is our ability to furnish an unbeatable combination of good men and good weapons. This infantry man, in training at Fort Knox, Kentucky, has learned that his M-1 (Garand) rifle is a weapon without peer. He can be depended on to perform notable with it

Fort Myer, Virginia. Alert and ready for action are these rough-riding, hardboiled members of a jeep crew at Fort Myer, Virginia. Properly equipped with new type helmet and Garand rifles, these soldiers of Uncle Sam's armoured forces typify the ruggedness and determination of the American fighting men

Putting them together. A corner of the assembly room at an armory, where war workers are putting together the parts which make up a Garand rifle

One last checkup. One last checkup is being given these Garand Rifles, following proof firing activity at an eastern armory

Garand rifles being packed for shipment to troops in training

Fort Benning. Rifleman. Garand rifle. When Uncle Sam makes big medicine against his enemies, he puts in strong ingredients. An American infantryman with a Garand rifle to meet the Army's high standards of workmanship

Invention for defense. John C. Garand, inventor of the Army's semi-automatic rifle, at work in his model shop

Fort Knox. Garand rifle. A young soldier of the armored forces, in training at Fort Knox, Kentucky, holds and sights his Garand rifle like an old timer. He likes the piece for its fine firing qualities and its rugged, dependable mechanism

Garand rifle

Members of the United States Air Force Honor Guard Precision Drill Team, 11th Wing at Bolling Air Force Base, District of Columbia, spin their M-1 Garand rifles during an exhibition for the residents of Ely, England. This was the first time the team performed for a British crowd. (Duplicate image, see also DF-SD-01-03268 or search 000824-F-4177H-005)

Members of the United States Air Force Honor Guard Precision Drill Team, 11th Wing at Bolling Air Force Base, Washington, D.C., spin their M-1 Garand rifles, with bayonets attached, during an exhibition for the residents of Ely, England. This was the first time the team performed for a British crowd. (Duplicate image, see also DF-SD-01-07659 or search 000824-F-4177H-005)

In celebration of the 228th Marine Corps Birthday, a US Marine Corps (USMC) Marine wears a World War II (WWII) era uniform, holding an M1 Garand rifle, as part of the historical period uniform pageant, held aboard Marine Corps Base (MCB) Quantico

The US Air Force (USAF) Honor Guard Drill Team conducts a performance at the Royal Air Force (RAF) Lakenheath Fitness and Sports Center gym. The performance is part of a five-day tour by the Drill Team through the United Kingdom (GBR) and is designed to promote base Honor Guard volunteerism. The 16-person performance lasted 15 minutes and showcased a professionally choreographed routine full of "show-stopping" weapon manuals, precise tosses, and complex weapon exchanges. Through complex drill routines with a fully operational M1 Garand rifle and fixed bayonets, the Drill Team embodies teamwork, professionalism, and discipline

The US Air Force (USAF) Honor Guard Drill Team conducts a performance at the Royal Air Force (RAF) Lakenheath Fitness and Sports Center gym. The performance is part of a five-day tour by the Drill Team through the United Kingdom (GBR) and is designed to promote base Honor Guard volunteerism. The 16-person performance lasted 15 minutes and showcased a professionally choreographed routine full of "show-stopping" weapon manuals, precise tosses, and complex weapon exchanges. Through complex drill routines with a fully operational M1 Garand rifle and fixed bayonets, the Drill Team embodies teamwork, professionalism, and discipline

The US Air Force (USAF) Honor Guard Drill Team conducts a performance at the Royal Air Force (RAF) Lakenheath Fitness and Sports Center gym. The performance is part of a five-day tour by the Drill Team through the United Kingdom (GBR) and is designed to promote base Honor Guard volunteerism. The 16-person performance lasted 15 minutes and showcased a professionally choreographed routine full of "show-stopping" weapon manuals, precise tosses, and complex weapon exchanges. Through complex drill routines with a fully operational M1 Garand rifle and fixed bayonets, the Drill Team embodies teamwork, professionalism, and discipline

Drill team members simultaneously hurl their 13-pound M1 Garand rifles over and around the Commander, performing a sequence of events unmatched by any other professional military drill team. The US Air Force Honor Guard Drill Team, 11th Operations Group (OG), Bolling Air Force Base (AFB), Washington D.C., serves to foster pride and confidence in our evolving air and space expeditionary force, inspires Air Force awareness in the military and civilian community, and encourages young men and women to serve their country. Through complex drill routines with a fully operational M1 Garand rifle and fixed bayonets, the drill team embodies teamwork, professionalism, and discipline. During...

The US Air Force (USAF) Honor Guard Drill Team conducts a performance at the Royal Air Force (RAF) Lakenheath Fitness and Sports Center gym. The performance is part of a five-day tour by the Drill Team through the United Kingdom (GBR) and is designed to promote base Honor Guard volunteerism. The 16-person performance lasted 15 minutes and showcased a professionally choreographed routine full of "show-stopping" weapon manuals, precise tosses, and complex weapon exchanges. Through complex drill routines with a fully operational M1 Garand rifle and fixed bayonets, the Drill Team embodies teamwork, professionalism, and discipline

The US Air Force (USAF) Honor Guard Drill Team conducts a performance at the Royal Air Force (RAF) Lakenheath Fitness and Sports Center gym. The performance is part of a five-day tour by the Drill Team through the United Kingdom (GBR) and is designed to promote base Honor Guard volunteerism. The 16-person performance lasted 15 minutes and showcased a professionally choreographed routine full of "show-stopping" weapon manuals, precise tosses, and complex weapon exchanges. Through complex drill routines with a fully operational M1 Garand rifle and fixed bayonets, the Drill Team embodies teamwork, professionalism, and discipline

During their visit to Royal Air Force (RAF) Mildenhall, United Kingdom (GBR), drill team members simultaneously twirl their 13-pound M1 Garand rifles while performing a sequence of events unmatched by any other professional military drill team. The US Air Force Honor Guard Drill Team, 11th Operations Group (OG), Bolling Air Force Base (AFB), Washington D.C., serves to foster pride and confidence in our evolving air and space expeditionary force, inspires Air Force awareness in the military and civilian community, and encourages young men and women to serve their country. Through its complex drill routines with a fully operational M1 Garand rifle and fixed bayonets, the drill team...

US Coas Guard (USCG) Firs Class Por Securiyman (PS1) Dennis Carney, Coasal Warfare Secor San Diego, fires an M1 Garand Rifle during he prone 300-yard rapid-fire sage of he 2006 Flee Forces Command (Pacific) Rifle and Pisol Championships. Sailors, Marines, Coas Guardsmen and civilians compeed in eam and individual divisions during he annual marksmanship compeiion.Calif. (May 52006) U.S. Coas Guard Por Securiyman 1s Class Dennis Carney of Coasal Warfare Secor San Diego fires an M1 Garand Rifle during he prone 300-yard rapid-fire sage of he 2006 Flee Forces Command (Pacific) Rifle and Pisol Championships. SailorsMarinesCoas Guardsmen and civilians compeed in...

Study Johnson semi-automatic rifle. Washington, D.C., May 29. Senator Morris Sheppard, left, Chairman of the Senate Military Affairs Committee, Maj. Gen. George A. Lynch, U.S. Chief of Infantry, and Senator A.B. Chandler of Kentucky, inspect the Johnson semi-automatic rifle which may replace the Garand gas-operated rifle as the Army's standard shoulder weapon. Capt. Melvin M. Johnson, inventor of the Johnson rifle, told the Senate Military Affairs today when it began consideration of a bill to change the Army's standard shoulder weapon, that his rifle could be manufactured more rapidly than the Garand