PICRYL
PICRYLThe World's Largest Public Domain Source
  • homeHome
  • searchSearch
  • photo_albumStories
  • collectionsCollections
  • infoAbout
  • star_rateUpgrade
  • account_boxLogin

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Discovery rolls out of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) past employees and media representatives on its way to rendezvous with shuttle Endeavour. Discovery is switching places with Endeavour which has been undergoing decommissioning in Orbiter Processing Facility-1 (OPF-1). Both shuttles will stop briefly outside OPF-3 for a "nose-to-nose" photo opportunity. Discovery then will be rolled into OPF-1 and Endeavour into the VAB. The image was taken from the top of the VAB. In OPF-1, Discovery will undergo further preparations for public display at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Virginia. Endeavour will be stored in the VAB until October when it will be moved into OPF-2 for further work to get it ready for public display at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/shuttle. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-6366

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the aft end of space shuttle Endeavour appears as it backs out of Orbiter Processing Facility-1 (OPF-1). Endeavour is switching places with shuttle Discovery which temporarily has been housed in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). Both shuttles will stop briefly outside OPF-3 for a "nose-to-nose" photo opportunity. Discovery then will be rolled into OPF-1 and Endeavour into the VAB. The image was taken from the top of the VAB. In OPF-1, Discovery will undergo further preparations for public display at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Virginia. Endeavour will be stored in the VAB until October when it will be moved into OPF-2 for further work to get it ready for public display at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/shuttle. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-6358

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Endeavour backs out of Orbiter Processing Facility-1 (OPF-1). Endeavour is switching places with shuttle Discovery which temporarily has been housed in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). Both shuttles will stop briefly outside OPF-3 for a "nose-to-nose" photo opportunity. Discovery then will be rolled into OPF-1 and Endeavour into the VAB. The image was taken from the top of the VAB. In OPF-1, Discovery will undergo further preparations for public display at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Virginia. Endeavour will be stored in the VAB until October when it will be moved into OPF-2 for further work to get it ready for public display at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/shuttle. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-6361

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Discovery rolls out of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) where it temporarily has been stored. Discovery is switching places with shuttle Endeavour which has been undergoing decommissioning in Orbiter Processing Facility-1 (OPF-1). Both shuttles will stop briefly outside OPF-3 for a "nose-to-nose" photo opportunity. Discovery then will be rolled into OPF-1 and Endeavour into the VAB. The image was taken from the top of the VAB. In OPF-1, Discovery will undergo further preparations for public display at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Virginia. Endeavour will be stored in the VAB until October when it will be moved into OPF-2 for further work to get it ready for public display at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/shuttle. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-6363

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Discovery, at right, awaits its turn to approach shuttle Endeavour outside Orbiter Processing Facility-3 (OPF-3). Discovery, which temporarily was being stored in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), is switching places with Endeavour, which has been undergoing decommissioning in OPF-1. Both shuttles will stop briefly outside OPF-3 for a "nose-to-nose" photo opportunity. Discovery then will be rolled into OPF-1 and Endeavour into the VAB. The image was taken from the top of the VAB. In OPF-1, Discovery will undergo further preparations for public display at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Virginia. Endeavour will be stored in the VAB until October when it will be moved into OPF-2 for further work to get it ready for public display at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/shuttle. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-6372

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttles Discovery, at right, and Endeavour go their separate ways outside Orbiter Processing Facility-3 (OPF-3) where they paused for a unique "nose-to-nose" photo opportunity. Discovery, which temporarily was being stored in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), is switching places with Endeavour, which has been undergoing decommissioning in OPF-1. Discovery will be rolled into OPF-1 and Endeavour into the VAB. The image was taken from the top of the VAB. In OPF-1, Discovery will undergo further preparations for public display at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Virginia. Endeavour will be stored in the VAB until October when it will be moved into OPF-2 for further work to get it ready for public display at the California Science Center in Los Angeles. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/shuttle. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-6375

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Engine Shop at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle main engine #2 sits on a transporter after technicians removed it from space shuttle Atlantis in Orbiter Processing Facility-2. All three main engines are being removed from Atlantis so that the vehicle can be decommissioned and prepared for eventual display at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2011-6515

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Technicians use a Hyster forklift to transport Engine #3 to the Engine Shop for possible future use after it was removed from space shuttle Atlantis in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Each of the three space shuttle main engines is 14 feet long and weighs 7,800 pounds. Removal of the space shuttle main engines is part of the Transition and Retirement work that is being performed in order to prepare Atlantis for eventual display at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2011-6527

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Technicians use a Hyster forklift to transport Engine #3 to the Engine Shop for possible future use after it was removed from space shuttle Atlantis in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Each of the three space shuttle main engines is 14 feet long and weighs 7,800 pounds. Removal of the space shuttle main engines is part of the Transition and Retirement work that is being performed in order to prepare Atlantis for eventual display at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2011-6526

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians used a Hyster forklift to remove Engine #3 from space shuttle Atlantis. The engine will be transported to the Engine Shop for possible future use. Each of the three space shuttle main engines is 14 feet long and weighs 7,800 pounds. Removal of the space shuttle main engines is part of the Transition and Retirement work that is being performed in order to prepare Atlantis for eventual display at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2011-6524

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a technician moves a Hyster forklift toward Engine #3 on space shuttle Atlantis. The forklift will be used to remove the engine and transport it to the Engine Shop for possible future use. Each of the three space shuttle main engines is 14 feet long and weighs 7,800 pounds. Removal of the space shuttle main engines is part of the Transition and Retirement work that is being performed in order to prepare Atlantis for eventual display at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2011-6517

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a technician moves a Hyster forklift toward Engine #3 on space shuttle Atlantis. The forklift will be used to remove the engine and transport it to the Engine Shop for possible future use. Each of the three space shuttle main engines is 14 feet long and weighs 7,800 pounds. Removal of the space shuttle main engines is part of the Transition and Retirement work that is being performed in order to prepare Atlantis for eventual display at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2011-6518

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a technician moves a Hyster forklift toward Engine #3 on space shuttle Atlantis. The forklift will be used to remove the engine and transport it to the Engine Shop for possible future use. Each of the three space shuttle main engines is 14 feet long and weighs 7,800 pounds. Removal of the space shuttle main engines is part of the Transition and Retirement work that is being performed in order to prepare Atlantis for eventual display at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2011-6520

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians use a Hyster forklift to position an engine removal device on Engine #3 on space shuttle Atlantis. The forklift will be used to remove the engine and transport it to the Engine Shop for possible future use. Each of the three space shuttle main engines is 14 feet long and weighs 7,800 pounds. Removal of the space shuttle main engines is part of the Transition and Retirement work that is being performed in order to prepare Atlantis for eventual display at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2011-6522

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians move a Hyster forklift closer to Engine #1, the final engine to be removed from space shuttle Atlantis. The forklift will be used to remove the engine and transport it to the Engine Shop for possible future use. Each of the three space shuttle main engines is 14 feet long and weighs 7,800 pounds. Removal of the space shuttle main engines is part of the Transition and Retirement work that is being performed in order to prepare Atlantis for eventual display at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2011-6530

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians used a Hyster forklift to remove Engine #1, the final engine to be removed from space shuttle Atlantis. The forklift will be used to transport the engine to the Engine Shop for possible future use. Each of the three space shuttle main engines is 14 feet long and weighs 7,800 pounds. Removal of the space shuttle main engines is part of the Transition and Retirement work that is being performed in order to prepare Atlantis for eventual display at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2011-6536

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians inside the aft area monitor the progress as a Hyster forklift is used to remove Engine #1, the final engine to be removed from space shuttle Atlantis. The forklift will be used to remove the engine and transport it to the Engine Shop for possible future use. Each of the three space shuttle main engines is 14 feet long and weighs 7,800 pounds. Removal of the space shuttle main engines is part of the Transition and Retirement work that is being performed in order to prepare Atlantis for eventual display at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2011-6533

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians use a Hyster forklift to remove Engine #1, the final engine to be removed from space shuttle Atlantis. The forklift will be used to transport the engine to the Engine Shop for possible future use. Each of the three space shuttle main engines is 14 feet long and weighs 7,800 pounds. Removal of the space shuttle main engines is part of the Transition and Retirement work that is being performed in order to prepare Atlantis for eventual display at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2011-6534

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a technician sitting on the Hyster forklift monitors the progress as the engine removal device moves toward Engine #1, the final engine to be removed from space shuttle Atlantis. The forklift will be used to remove the engine and transport it to the Engine Shop for possible future use. Each of the three space shuttle main engines is 14 feet long and weighs 7,800 pounds. Removal of the space shuttle main engines is part of the Transition and Retirement work that is being performed in order to prepare Atlantis for eventual display at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2011-6532

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Technicians use a Hyster forklift to transport Engine #1, the final engine removed from space shuttle Atlantis, to the Engine Shop for possible future use. The engine was removed from Atlantis in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Each of the three space shuttle main engines is 14 feet long and weighs 7,800 pounds. Removal of the space shuttle main engines is part of the Transition and Retirement work that is being performed in order to prepare Atlantis for eventual display at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. Photo credit: Frankie Martin KSC-2011-6539

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Exhibits from several NASA centers are on display for the nationwide attendees of the Tom Joyner Family Reunion. The event was held in the Exhibit Hall of the Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center in Kissimmee, Fla., and hosted by nationally syndicated radio personality Tom Joyner during the extended Labor Day weekend Sept. 1-4. Besides offering attendees the opportunity to visit tourist attractions in the Orlando area, the reunion gave NASA education specialists an avenue to tout the benefits of math and scientific learning, as well as the many educational opportunities offered by the space agency. For more information on NASA's education initiatives, visit http://www.nasa.gov/education. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-6759

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Attendees of the Tom Joyner Family Reunion wait their turns to have photos taken that will make them appear to be dressed in space suits. The reunion was held in the Exhibit Hall of the Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center in Kissimmee, Fla., and hosted by nationally syndicated radio personality Tom Joyner during the extended Labor Day weekend Sept. 1-4. Besides offering attendees the opportunity to visit tourist attractions in the Orlando area, the event gave NASA education specialists an avenue to tout the benefits of math and scientific learning, as well as the many educational opportunities offered by the space agency. For more information on NASA's education initiatives, visit http://www.nasa.gov/education. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7247

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The NASA Legends and Trailblazers Panel take to the stage at the Tom Joyner Family Reunion. From left is the master of ceremonies, Lance Foster (standing) with panel members Robyn Gordon, director of Center Operations, Glenn Research Center; Lewis Braxton, deputy director, Ames Research Center; Woodrow Whitlow, associate administrator for Mission Support Directorates; astronaut Leland Melvin, associate administrator for Education; and astronaut Mike Foreman, Johnson Space Center. The event was held in the Exhibit Hall of the Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center in Kissimmee, Fla., and hosted by nationally syndicated radio personality Tom Joyner during the extended Labor Day weekend Sept. 1-4. Besides offering attendees the opportunity to visit tourist attractions in the Orlando area, the reunion gave NASA education specialists an avenue to tout the benefits of math and scientific learning, as well as the many educational opportunities offered by the space agency. For more information on NASA's education initiatives, visit http://www.nasa.gov/education. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7249

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The NASA Legends and Trailblazers Panel address the audience attending the Tom Joyner Family Reunion. From left is the master of ceremonies, Lance Foster (standing) with panel members Robyn Gordon, director of Center Operations, Glenn Research Center; Lewis Braxton, deputy director, Ames Research Center; Woodrow Whitlow, associate administrator for Mission Support Directorates, NASA Headquarters; astronaut Leland Melvin, associate administrator for Education, NASA Headquarters; and astronaut Mike Foreman, Johnson Space Center. The event was held in the Exhibit Hall of the Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center in Kissimmee, Fla., and hosted by nationally syndicated radio personality Tom Joyner during the extended Labor Day weekend Sept. 1-4. Besides offering attendees the opportunity to visit tourist attractions in the Orlando area, the reunion gave NASA education specialists an avenue to tout the benefits of math and scientific learning, as well as the many educational opportunities offered by the space agency. For more information on NASA's education initiatives, visit http://www.nasa.gov/education. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7250

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA astronauts Mike Foreman (seated, left) and Leland Melvin (seated, right) sign autographs for the nationwide attendees of the Tom Joyner Family Reunion. Melvin also is NASA's associate administrator for education. They are seated in front of NASA’s Journey to Tomorrow trailer at reunion headquarters at the Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center in Kissimmee, Fla. The reunion was hosted by nationally syndicated radio personality Tom Joyner during the extended Labor Day weekend Sept. 1-4. Besides offering attendees the opportunity to visit tourist attractions in the Orlando area, the reunion gave NASA education specialists an avenue to tout the benefits of math and scientific learning, as well as the many educational opportunities offered by the space agency. For more information on NASA's education initiatives, visit http://www.nasa.gov/education. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-6763

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA astronauts Mike Foreman (seated, left) and Greg Johnson (seated, right) sign autographs for the nationwide attendees of the Tom Joyner Family Reunion. They are seated in front of NASA’s Journey to Tomorrow trailer at reunion headquarters at the Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center in Kissimmee, Fla. The reunion was hosted by nationally syndicated radio personality Tom Joyner during the extended Labor Day weekend Sept. 1-4. Besides offering attendees the opportunity to visit tourist attractions in the Orlando area, the reunion gave NASA education specialists an avenue to tout the benefits of math and scientific learning, as well as the many educational opportunities offered by the space agency. For more information on NASA's education initiatives, visit http://www.nasa.gov/education. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-6762

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA astronauts Mike Foreman (seated, left) and Greg Johnson (seated, right) enjoy the quiet before the storm as they prepare to sign autographs for the nationwide attendees of the Tom Joyner Family Reunion. They are seated in front of NASA’s Journey to Tomorrow trailer at reunion headquarters at the Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center in Kissimmee, Fla. The reunion was hosted by nationally syndicated radio personality Tom Joyner during the extended Labor Day weekend Sept. 1-4. Besides offering attendees the opportunity to visit tourist attractions in the Orlando area, the reunion gave NASA education specialists an avenue to tout the benefits of math and scientific learning, as well as the many educational opportunities offered by the space agency. For more information on NASA's education initiatives, visit http://www.nasa.gov/education. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-6761

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- An education specialist from Kennedy Space Center prepares to demonstrate the principles of a vacuum chamber to the nationwide attendees of the Tom Joyner Family Reunion. The demonstration was held in front of NASA’s Journey to Tomorrow trailer at reunion headquarters at the Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center in Kissimmee, Fla. The reunion was hosted by nationally syndicated radio personality Tom Joyner during the extended Labor Day weekend Sept. 1-4. Besides offering attendees the opportunity to visit tourist attractions in the Orlando area, the reunion gave NASA an avenue to tout the benefits of math and scientific learning, as well as the many educational opportunities offered by the space agency. For more information on NASA's education initiatives, visit http://www.nasa.gov/education. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-6760

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Education specialists at a joint exhibit from NASA's Kennedy Space Center and Glenn Research Center discuss the advancements the agency has made in aeronautics with the nationwide attendees of the Tom Joyner Family Reunion. The event was held in the Exhibit Hall of the Gaylord Palms Resort and Convention Center in Kissimmee, Fla., and hosted by nationally syndicated radio personality Tom Joyner during the extended Labor Day weekend Sept. 1-4. Besides offering attendees the opportunity to visit tourist attractions in the Orlando area, the reunion gave NASA an avenue to tout the benefits of math and scientific learning, as well as the many educational opportunities offered by the space agency. For more information on NASA's education initiatives, visit http://www.nasa.gov/education. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7248

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Actress Nichelle Nichols (Lt. Uhura on Star Trek) signs autographs for a guest at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida during activities for the agency’s Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory mission (GRAIL). Nichols was on hand to celebrate the 45th anniversary of the first airing of the Star Trek television series. The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex is hosting “Star Trek: The Exhibition” to show visitors where “science fiction meets science fact.” GRAIL will fly twin spacecraft in tandem around the moon to precisely measure and map variations in the moon's gravitational field. The mission will provide the most accurate global gravity field to date for any planet, including Earth. This detailed information will reveal differences in the density of the moon's crust and mantle and will help answer fundamental questions about the moon's internal structure, thermal evolution, and history of collisions with asteroids. The aim is to map the moon's gravity field so completely that future moon vehicles can safely navigate anywhere on the moon’s surface. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/grail. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-6853

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At KARS Park 1 on Merritt Island in Florida, a group of Tweetup participants take pictures and watch excitedly as a United Launch Alliance Delta II Heavy rocket lifts off at 9:08 a.m. EDT Sept. 10 from Space Launch Complex 17B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station carrying NASA’s Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission to the moon. The tweeters will share their experiences with followers through the social networking site Twitter. GRAIL will fly twin spacecraft in tandem around the moon to precisely measure and map variations in the moon's gravitational field. The mission will provide the most accurate global gravity field to date for any planet, including Earth. This detailed information will reveal differences in the density of the moon's crust and mantle and will help answer fundamental questions about the moon's internal structure, thermal evolution, and history of collisions with asteroids. The aim is to map the moon's gravity field so completely that future moon vehicles can safely navigate anywhere on the moon’s surface. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/grail. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-6884

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At KARS Park 1 on Merritt Island in Florida, a group of Tweetup participants watch as a United Launch Alliance Delta II Heavy rocket lifts off at 9:08 a.m. EDT Sept. 10 from Space Launch Complex 17B at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station carrying NASA’s Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission to the moon. The tweeters will share their experiences with followers through the social networking site Twitter. GRAIL will fly twin spacecraft in tandem around the moon to precisely measure and map variations in the moon's gravitational field. The mission will provide the most accurate global gravity field to date for any planet, including Earth. This detailed information will reveal differences in the density of the moon's crust and mantle and will help answer fundamental questions about the moon's internal structure, thermal evolution, and history of collisions with asteroids. The aim is to map the moon's gravity field so completely that future moon vehicles can safely navigate anywhere on the moon’s surface. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/grail. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-6882

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a truck backs space shuttle Discovery's orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pod into Orbiter Processing Facility-1 (OPF). The OMS has been returned from White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico where it underwent a complete deservicing and cleaning. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing of space shuttle Discovery. The shuttle will go to the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum, Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/shuttle. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7244

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a truck transports space shuttle Discovery's orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pod to the Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF). The OMS has been returned from White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico where it underwent a complete deservicing and cleaning. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing of space shuttle Discovery. The shuttle will go to the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum, Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/shuttle. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7243

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a crane is lowered toward an orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pod that awaits installation on space shuttle Discovery in Orbiter Processing Facility-1. The OMS pod was returned from White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico where it underwent a complete deservicing and cleaning. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing of space shuttle Discovery. The shuttle will go to the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum, Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va., in April 2012. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/shuttle. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7374

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In Orbiter Processing Facility-1 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians assist as a crane lowers an orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pod for installation on space shuttle Discovery. The OMS pod was returned from White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico where it underwent a complete deservicing and cleaning. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing of space shuttle Discovery. The shuttle will go to the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum, Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va., in April 2012. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/shuttle. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7389

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In Orbiter Processing Facility-1 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians assist as a crane is secured around an orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pod that will be installed on space shuttle Discovery. The OMS pod was returned from White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico where it underwent a complete deservicing and cleaning. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing of space shuttle Discovery. The shuttle will go to the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum, Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va., in April 2012. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/shuttle. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7377

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In Orbiter Processing Facility-1 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a crane lowers an orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pod closer for installation on space shuttle Discovery. The OMS pod was returned from White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico where it underwent a complete deservicing and cleaning. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing of space shuttle Discovery. The shuttle will go to the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum, Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va., in April 2012. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/shuttle. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7385

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In Orbiter Processing Facility-1 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians assist as a crane lowers an orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pod for installation on space shuttle Discovery. The OMS pod was returned from White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico where it underwent a complete deservicing and cleaning. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing of space shuttle Discovery. The shuttle will go to the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum, Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va., in April 2012. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/shuttle. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7390

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In Orbiter Processing Facility-1 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians monitor the progress as a crane is used to carry an orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pod that will be installed on space shuttle Discovery. The OMS pod was returned from White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico where it underwent a complete deservicing and cleaning. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing of space shuttle Discovery. The shuttle will go to the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum, Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va., in April 2012. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/shuttle. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7378

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, an orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pod awaits installation on space shuttle Discovery in Orbiter Processing Facility-1. The OMS pod was returned from White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico where it underwent a complete deservicing and cleaning. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing of space shuttle Discovery. The shuttle will go to the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum, Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va., in April 2012. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/shuttle. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7373

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In Orbiter Processing Facility-1 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians assist as a crane lowers an orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pod for installation on space shuttle Discovery. The OMS pod was returned from White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico where it underwent a complete deservicing and cleaning. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing of space shuttle Discovery. The shuttle will go to the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum, Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va., in April 2012. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/shuttle. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7387

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In Orbiter Processing Facility-1 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a technician monitors the progress as a crane is used to carry an orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pod that will be installed on space shuttle Discovery. The OMS pod was returned from White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico where it underwent a complete deservicing and cleaning. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing of space shuttle Discovery. The shuttle will go to the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum, Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va., in April 2012. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/shuttle. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7381

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Pegasus Barge makes its way through a drawbridge after leaving NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The 266-foot-long and 50-foot-wide barge will be towed by NASA's Freedom Star ship to deliver space shuttle main engine (SSME) ground support equipment to Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. Since being delivered to NASA in 1999, Pegasus sailed 41 times and transported 31 shuttle external fuel tanks from Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Kennedy. The barge is leaving Kennedy, perhaps for the final time. Both the barge and shuttle equipment will remain in storage until their specific future uses are determined. The SSMEs themselves will be transported to Stennis separately for use with the agency's new heavy-lift rocket, the Space Launch System. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing. For more information about Shuttle Transition and Retirement, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/transition/home/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7735

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Workers are at the ready as tugboats maneuver NASA's Pegasus Barge to the entrance of the Port Canaveral lock in Florida. The 266-foot-long and 50-foot-wide barge will be towed by NASA's Freedom Star ship to deliver space shuttle main engine (SSME) ground support equipment to Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. Since being delivered to NASA in 1999, Pegasus sailed 41 times and transported 31 shuttle external fuel tanks from Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Kennedy Space Center. The barge is leaving Kennedy, perhaps for the final time. Both the barge and shuttle equipment will remain in storage until their specific future uses are determined. The SSMEs themselves will be transported to Stennis separately for use with the agency's new heavy-lift rocket, the Space Launch System. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing. For more information about Shuttle Transition and Retirement, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/transition/home/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7723

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Workers monitor the progress as a tugboat pulls NASA's Pegasus Barge through the Port Canaveral lock in Florida. The 266-foot-long and 50-foot-wide barge will be towed by NASA's Freedom Star ship to deliver space shuttle main engine (SSME) ground support equipment to Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. Since being delivered to NASA in 1999, Pegasus sailed 41 times and transported 31 shuttle external fuel tanks from Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Kennedy Space Center. The barge is leaving Kennedy, perhaps for the final time. Both the barge and shuttle equipment will remain in storage until their specific future uses are determined. The SSMEs themselves will be transported to Stennis separately for use with the agency's new heavy-lift rocket, the Space Launch System. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing. For more information about Shuttle Transition and Retirement, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/transition/home/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7727

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA's Freedom Star ship tows the Pegasus Barge through Port Canaveral in Florida. Freedom Star is towing the 266-foot-long and 50-foot-wide barge to Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. to deliver space shuttle main engine (SSME) ground support equipment. Since being delivered to NASA in 1999, Pegasus sailed 41 times and transported 31 shuttle external fuel tanks from Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Kennedy Space Center. The barge is leaving Kennedy, perhaps for the final time. Both the barge and shuttle equipment will remain in storage until their specific future uses are determined. The SSMEs themselves will be transported to Stennis separately for use with the agency's new heavy-lift rocket, the Space Launch System. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing. For more information about Shuttle Transition and Retirement, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/transition/home/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7746

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA's Freedom Star ship tows the Pegasus Barge through Port Canaveral in Florida. Freedom Star is towing the 266-foot-long and 50-foot-wide barge to Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. to deliver space shuttle main engine (SSME) ground support equipment. Since being delivered to NASA in 1999, Pegasus sailed 41 times and transported 31 shuttle external fuel tanks from Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Kennedy Space Center. The barge is leaving Kennedy, perhaps for the final time. Both the barge and shuttle equipment will remain in storage until their specific future uses are determined. The SSMEs themselves will be transported to Stennis separately for use with the agency's new heavy-lift rocket, the Space Launch System. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing. For more information about Shuttle Transition and Retirement, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/transition/home/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7749

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A tugboat pulls the Pegasus Barge through Port Canaveral after leaving NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The 266-foot-long and 50-foot-wide barge will be towed by NASA's Freedom Star ship to deliver space shuttle main engine (SSME) ground support equipment to Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. Since being delivered to NASA in 1999, Pegasus sailed 41 times and transported 31 shuttle external fuel tanks from Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Kennedy. The barge is leaving Kennedy, perhaps for the final time. Both the barge and shuttle equipment will remain in storage until their specific future uses are determined. The SSMEs themselves will be transported to Stennis separately for use with the agency's new heavy-lift rocket, the Space Launch System. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing. For more information about Shuttle Transition and Retirement, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/transition/home/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7737

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A tugboat pulls NASA's Pegasus Barge through the Port Canaveral lock in Florida. The 266 ft long and 50 ft wide barge will be towed by NASA's Freedom Star ship to deliver space shuttle main engine (SSME) ground support equipment to Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. Since being delivered to NASA in 1999, Pegasus sailed 41 times and transported 31 shuttle external fuel tanks from Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Kennedy Space Center. The barge is leaving Kennedy, perhaps for the final time. Both the barge and shuttle equipment will remain in storage until their specific future uses are determined. The SSMEs themselves will be transported to Stennis separately for use with the agency's new heavy-lift rocket, the Space Launch System. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing. For more information about Shuttle Transition and Retirement, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/transition/home/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7728

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A tugboat pulls the Pegasus Barge through Port Canaveral after leaving NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The 266-foot-long and 50-foot-wide barge will be towed by NASA's Freedom Star ship to deliver space shuttle main engine (SSME) ground support equipment to Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. Since being delivered to NASA in 1999, Pegasus sailed 41 times and transported 31 shuttle external fuel tanks from Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Kennedy. The barge is leaving Kennedy, perhaps for the final time. Both the barge and shuttle equipment will remain in storage until their specific future uses are determined. The SSMEs themselves will be transported to Stennis separately for use with the agency's new heavy-lift rocket, the Space Launch System. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing. For more information about Shuttle Transition and Retirement, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/transition/home/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7738

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –This 3-D image shows a tugboat beginning to push the Pegasus Barge away from the dock at the Turn Basin in the Launch Complex 39 area at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The 266-foot-long and 50-foot-wide barge will be towed by NASA's Freedom Star ship to deliver space shuttle main engine (SSME) ground support equipment to Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. Since being delivered to NASA in 1999, Pegasus sailed 41 times and transported 31 shuttle external fuel tanks from Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Kennedy. To view this image, use green and magenta 3-D glasses. The barge is leaving Kennedy, perhaps for the final time. Both the barge and shuttle equipment will remain in storage until their specific future uses are determined. The SSMEs themselves will be transported to Stennis separately for use with the agency's new heavy-lift rocket, the Space Launch System. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing. For more information about Shuttle Transition and Retirement, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/transition/home/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7756

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A tugboat pushes the Pegasus Barge through Port Canaveral after leaving NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The 266-foot-long and 50-foot-wide barge will be towed by NASA's Freedom Star ship to deliver space shuttle main engine (SSME) ground support equipment to Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. Since being delivered to NASA in 1999, Pegasus sailed 41 times and transported 31 shuttle external fuel tanks from Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Kennedy. The barge is leaving Kennedy, perhaps for the final time. Both the barge and shuttle equipment will remain in storage until their specific future uses are determined. The SSMEs themselves will be transported to Stennis separately for use with the agency's new heavy-lift rocket, the Space Launch System. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing. For more information about Shuttle Transition and Retirement, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/transition/home/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7740

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Tugboats maneuver the Pegasus Barge through Port Canaveral after leaving NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The 266-foot-long and 50-foot-wide barge will be towed by NASA's Freedom Star ship to deliver space shuttle main engine (SSME) ground support equipment to Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. Since being delivered to NASA in 1999, Pegasus sailed 41 times and transported 31 shuttle external fuel tanks from Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Kennedy. The barge is leaving Kennedy, perhaps for the final time. Both the barge and shuttle equipment will remain in storage until their specific future uses are determined. The SSMEs themselves will be transported to Stennis separately for use with the agency's new heavy-lift rocket, the Space Launch System. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing. For more information about Shuttle Transition and Retirement, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/transition/home/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7742

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –This 3-D image shows the tugboat, Miss Alexandra, beginning to push the Pegasus Barge away from the dock at the Turn Basin in the Launch Complex 39 area at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The 266-foot-long and 50-foot-wide barge will be towed by NASA's Freedom Star ship to deliver space shuttle main engine (SSME) ground support equipment to Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. Since being delivered to NASA in 1999, Pegasus sailed 41 times and transported 31 shuttle external fuel tanks from Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Kennedy. To view this image, use green and magenta 3-D glasses. The barge is leaving Kennedy, perhaps for the final time. Both the barge and shuttle equipment will remain in storage until their specific future uses are determined. The SSMEs themselves will be transported to Stennis separately for use with the agency's new heavy-lift rocket, the Space Launch System. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing. For more information about Shuttle Transition and Retirement, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/transition/home/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7755

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A tugboat pulls alongside the dock as NASA's Pegasus Barge makes its way through the Port Canaveral lock in Florida. The 266-foot-long and 50-foot-wide barge will be towed by NASA's Freedom Star ship to deliver space shuttle main engine (SSME) ground support equipment to Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. Since being delivered to NASA in 1999, Pegasus sailed 41 times and transported 31 shuttle external fuel tanks from Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Kennedy Space Center. The barge is leaving Kennedy, perhaps for the final time. Both the barge and shuttle equipment will remain in storage until their specific future uses are determined. The SSMEs themselves will be transported to Stennis separately for use with the agency's new heavy-lift rocket, the Space Launch System. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing. For more information about Shuttle Transition and Retirement, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/transition/home/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7729

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Tugboats maneuver NASA's Pegasus Barge over the Banana River as it makes its way to the Port Canaveral lock in Florida. The 266-foot-long and 50-foot-wide barge will be towed by NASA's Freedom Star ship to deliver space shuttle main engine (SSME) ground support equipment to Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. Since being delivered to NASA in 1999, Pegasus sailed 41 times and transported 31 shuttle external fuel tanks from Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Kennedy Space Center. The barge is leaving Kennedy, perhaps for the final time. Both the barge and shuttle equipment will remain in storage until their specific future uses are determined. The SSMEs themselves will be transported to Stennis separately for use with the agency's new heavy-lift rocket, the Space Launch System. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing. For more information about Shuttle Transition and Retirement, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/transition/home/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7722

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA's Freedom Star ship tows the Pegasus Barge through Port Canaveral in Florida. Freedom Star is towing the 266-foot-long and 50-foot-wide barge to Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. to deliver space shuttle main engine (SSME) ground support equipment. Since being delivered to NASA in 1999, Pegasus sailed 41 times and transported 31 shuttle external fuel tanks from Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Kennedy Space Center. The barge is leaving Kennedy, perhaps for the final time. Both the barge and shuttle equipment will remain in storage until their specific future uses are determined. The SSMEs themselves will be transported to Stennis separately for use with the agency's new heavy-lift rocket, the Space Launch System. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing. For more information about Shuttle Transition and Retirement, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/transition/home/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7748

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A tugboat pulls the Pegasus Barge through Port Canaveral after leaving NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The 266-foot-long and 50-foot-wide barge will be towed by NASA's Freedom Star ship to deliver space shuttle main engine (SSME) ground support equipment to Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. Since being delivered to NASA in 1999, Pegasus sailed 41 times and transported 31 shuttle external fuel tanks from Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Kennedy. The barge is leaving Kennedy, perhaps for the final time. Both the barge and shuttle equipment will remain in storage until their specific future uses are determined. The SSMEs themselves will be transported to Stennis separately for use with the agency's new heavy-lift rocket, the Space Launch System. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing. For more information about Shuttle Transition and Retirement, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/transition/home/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7736

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA's Freedom Star ship tows the Pegasus Barge through Port Canaveral in Florida. Freedom Star is towing the 266-foot-long and 50-foot-wide barge to Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. to deliver space shuttle main engine (SSME) ground support equipment. Since being delivered to NASA in 1999, Pegasus sailed 41 times and transported 31 shuttle external fuel tanks from Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Kennedy Space Center. The barge is leaving Kennedy, perhaps for the final time. Both the barge and shuttle equipment will remain in storage until their specific future uses are determined. The SSMEs themselves will be transported to Stennis separately for use with the agency's new heavy-lift rocket, the Space Launch System. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing. For more information about Shuttle Transition and Retirement, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/transition/home/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7752

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Viewers watch from the sidelines as NASA's Pegasus Barge makes its way through the Port Canaveral lock in Florida. The 266-foot-long and 50-foot-wide barge will be towed by NASA's Freedom Star ship to deliver space shuttle main engine (SSME) ground support equipment to Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. Since being delivered to NASA in 1999, Pegasus sailed 41 times and transported 31 shuttle external fuel tanks from Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Kennedy Space Center. The barge is leaving Kennedy, perhaps for the final time. Both the barge and shuttle equipment will remain in storage until their specific future uses are determined. The SSMEs themselves will be transported to Stennis separately for use with the agency's new heavy-lift rocket, the Space Launch System. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing. For more information about Shuttle Transition and Retirement, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/transition/home/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7730

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Tugboats maneuver the Pegasus Barge through Port Canaveral after leaving NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The 266-foot-long and 50-foot-wide barge will be towed by NASA's Freedom Star ship to deliver space shuttle main engine (SSME) ground support equipment to Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. Since being delivered to NASA in 1999, Pegasus sailed 41 times and transported 31 shuttle external fuel tanks from Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Kennedy. The barge is leaving Kennedy, perhaps for the final time. Both the barge and shuttle equipment will remain in storage until their specific future uses are determined. The SSMEs themselves will be transported to Stennis separately for use with the agency's new heavy-lift rocket, the Space Launch System. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing. For more information about Shuttle Transition and Retirement, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/transition/home/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7745

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA's Freedom Star ship tows the Pegasus Barge through Port Canaveral in Florida. Freedom Star is towing the 266-foot-long and 50-foot-wide barge to Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. to deliver space shuttle main engine (SSME) ground support equipment. Since being delivered to NASA in 1999, Pegasus sailed 41 times and transported 31 shuttle external fuel tanks from Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Kennedy Space Center. The barge is leaving Kennedy, perhaps for the final time. Both the barge and shuttle equipment will remain in storage until their specific future uses are determined. The SSMEs themselves will be transported to Stennis separately for use with the agency's new heavy-lift rocket, the Space Launch System. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing. For more information about Shuttle Transition and Retirement, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/transition/home/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7747

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A tugboat pulls NASA's Pegasus Barge through the Port Canaveral lock in Florida. The 266-foot-long and 50-foot-wide barge will be towed by NASA's Freedom Star ship to deliver space shuttle main engine (SSME) ground support equipment to Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. Since being delivered to NASA in 1999, Pegasus sailed 41 times and transported 31 shuttle external fuel tanks from Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Kennedy Space Center. The barge is leaving Kennedy, perhaps for the final time. Both the barge and shuttle equipment will remain in storage until their specific future uses are determined. The SSMEs themselves will be transported to Stennis separately for use with the agency's new heavy-lift rocket, the Space Launch System. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing. For more information about Shuttle Transition and Retirement, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/transition/home/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7732

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Tugboats maneuver the Pegasus Barge through Port Canaveral after leaving NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The 266-foot-long and 50-foot-wide barge will be towed by NASA's Freedom Star ship to deliver space shuttle main engine (SSME) ground support equipment to Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. Since being delivered to NASA in 1999, Pegasus sailed 41 times and transported 31 shuttle external fuel tanks from Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Kennedy. The barge is leaving Kennedy, perhaps for the final time. Both the barge and shuttle equipment will remain in storage until their specific future uses are determined. The SSMEs themselves will be transported to Stennis separately for use with the agency's new heavy-lift rocket, the Space Launch System. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing. For more information about Shuttle Transition and Retirement, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/transition/home/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7743

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Tugboats maneuver the Pegasus Barge through Port Canaveral after leaving NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The 266-foot-long and 50-foot-wide barge will be towed by NASA's Freedom Star ship to deliver space shuttle main engine (SSME) ground support equipment to Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. Since being delivered to NASA in 1999, Pegasus sailed 41 times and transported 31 shuttle external fuel tanks from Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Kennedy. The barge is leaving Kennedy, perhaps for the final time. Both the barge and shuttle equipment will remain in storage until their specific future uses are determined. The SSMEs themselves will be transported to Stennis separately for use with the agency's new heavy-lift rocket, the Space Launch System. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing. For more information about Shuttle Transition and Retirement, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/transition/home/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7744

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A tugboat pulls NASA's Pegasus Barge through the Port Canaveral lock in Florida. The 266-foot-long and 50-foot-wide barge will be towed by NASA's Freedom Star ship to deliver space shuttle main engine (SSME) ground support equipment to Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss. Since being delivered to NASA in 1999, Pegasus sailed 41 times and transported 31 shuttle external fuel tanks from Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans to Kennedy Space Center. The barge is leaving Kennedy, perhaps for the final time. Both the barge and shuttle equipment will remain in storage until their specific future uses are determined. The SSMEs themselves will be transported to Stennis separately for use with the agency's new heavy-lift rocket, the Space Launch System. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing. For more information about Shuttle Transition and Retirement, visit http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/transition/home/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7731

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Members of the media view the Radiological Control Center (RADCC) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida during a tour regarding safety equipment and procedures for the upcoming launch of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. The MSL spacecraft includes a multi-mission radioisotope thermoelectric generator (MMRTG) that will generate the power needed for the mission from the natural decay of plutonium-238, a non-weapons-grade form of the radioisotope. MSL's components include a car-sized rover, Curiosity, which has 10 science instruments designed to search for signs of life, including methane, and help determine if the gas is from a biological or geological source. Launch of MSL aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket is targeted for Nov. 26 from Space Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7861

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Randy Scott, director of Kennedy Space Center's Radiological Control Center (RADCC), speaks to media during a tour regarding safety equipment and procedures for the upcoming launch of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. Behind him is Steve Homann, senior advisor for the Department of Energy. The MSL spacecraft includes a multi-mission radioisotope thermoelectric generator (MMRTG) that will generate the power needed for the mission from the natural decay of plutonium-238, a non-weapons-grade form of the radioisotope. MSL's components include a car-sized rover, Curiosity, which has 10 science instruments designed to search for signs of life, including methane, and help determine if the gas is from a biological or geological source. Launch of MSL aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket is targeted for Nov. 26 from Space Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7856

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Surrounded by monitors and consoles, Randy Scott, director of Kennedy Space Center's Radiological Control Center (RADCC), speaks to media during a tour regarding safety equipment and procedures for the upcoming launch of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. The MSL spacecraft includes a multi-mission radioisotope thermoelectric generator (MMRTG) that will generate the power needed for the mission from the natural decay of plutonium-238, a non-weapons-grade form of the radioisotope. MSL's components include a car-sized rover, Curiosity, which has 10 science instruments designed to search for signs of life, including methane, and help determine if the gas is from a biological or geological source. Launch of MSL aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket is targeted for Nov. 26 from Space Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7859

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Members of the media take a tour of the Radiological Control Center (RADCC) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The tour focused on safety equipment and procedures for the upcoming launch of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. The MSL spacecraft includes a multi-mission radioisotope thermoelectric generator (MMRTG) that will generate the power needed for the mission from the natural decay of plutonium-238, a non-weapons-grade form of the radioisotope. MSL's components include a car-sized rover, Curiosity, which has 10 science instruments designed to search for signs of life, including methane, and help determine if the gas is from a biological or geological source. Launch of MSL aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket is targeted for Nov. 26 from Space Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7860

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- During a tour of the Radiological Control Center (RADCC) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, members of the media listen as Ryan Bechtel of the U.S. Department of Energy explains safety equipment and procedures for the upcoming launch of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. The MSL spacecraft includes a multi-mission radioisotope thermoelectric generator (MMRTG) that will generate the power needed for the mission from the natural decay of plutonium-238, a non-weapons-grade form of the radioisotope. MSL's components include a car-sized rover, Curiosity, which has 10 science instruments designed to search for signs of life, including methane, and help determine if the gas is from a biological or geological source. Launch of MSL aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket is targeted for Nov. 26 from Space Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7862

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Steve Homann, senior advisor for the Department of Energy, speaks to media during a tour of the Radiological Control Center (RADCC) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The tour focused on safety equipment and procedures for the upcoming launch of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. The MSL spacecraft includes a multi-mission radioisotope thermoelectric generator (MMRTG) that will generate the power needed for the mission from the natural decay of plutonium-238, a non-weapons-grade form of the radioisotope. MSL's components include a car-sized rover, Curiosity, which has 10 science instruments designed to search for signs of life, including methane, and help determine if the gas is from a biological or geological source. Launch of MSL aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket is targeted for Nov. 26 from Space Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7858

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- On Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, the 197-foot-tall United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket rolls to the launch pad at Space Launch Complex 41. Atop the rocket is NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), enclosed in its payload fairing. The rocket began its move from the Vertical Integration Facility at 8 a.m. EST and arrived at the pad at 8:40 a.m. Liftoff is planned during a launch window which extends from 10:02 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. EST on Nov. 26. MSL's components include a car-sized rover, Curiosity, which has 10 science instruments designed to search for signs of life, including methane, and help determine if the gas is from a biological or geological source. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7910

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The NASA and Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) logos appear above the American flag and Atlas logo on the payload fairing atop the 197-foot-tall United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket. Enclosed inside the fairing is the MSL spacecraft, awaiting its launch on a mission to the Red Planet. The rocket is on its way from the Vertical Integration Facility to the launch pad at Space Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The vehicle arrived at the launch pad at 8:40 a.m. EST. Liftoff is planned during a launch window which extends from 10:02 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. EST on Nov. 26. MSL's components include a car-sized rover, Curiosity, which has 10 science instruments designed to search for signs of life, including methane, and help determine if the gas is from a biological or geological source. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7909

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- On Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, the 197-foot-tall United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket moves away from the Vertical Integration Facility (VIF) during the vehicle's rollout to the launch pad at Space Launch Complex 41. Atop the rocket is NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), enclosed in its payload fairing. The rocket began its move from the VIF at 8 a.m. EST and arrived at the pad at 8:40 a.m. Liftoff is planned during a launch window which extends from 10:02 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. EST on Nov. 26. MSL's components include a car-sized rover, Curiosity, which has 10 science instruments designed to search for signs of life, including methane, and help determine if the gas is from a biological or geological source. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7907

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The 197-foot-tall United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket seems surrounded by lightning masts as it arrives at the launch pad at Space Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Atop the rocket is NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), enclosed in its payload fairing. The rocket began its move from the Vertical Integration Facility at 8 a.m. EST and arrived at the pad at 8:40 a.m. Liftoff is planned during a launch window which extends from 10:02 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. EST on Nov. 26. MSL's components include a car-sized rover, Curiosity, which has 10 science instruments designed to search for signs of life, including methane, and help determine if the gas is from a biological or geological source. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7912

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- The NASA and Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) logos appear above the American flag and Atlas logo on the payload fairing atop the 197-foot-tall United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket. Enclosed inside the fairing is the MSL spacecraft, awaiting its launch on a mission to the Red Planet. At 8 a.m., the rocket rolled out of the Vertical Integration Facility at Space Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, arriving at the launch pad at 8:40 a.m. Liftoff is planned during a launch window which extends from 10:02 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. EST on Nov. 26. MSL's components include a car-sized rover, Curiosity, which has 10 science instruments designed to search for signs of life, including methane, and help determine if the gas is from a biological or geological source. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7915

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- On Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, the payload fairing protecting NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) stands atop the 197-foot-tall United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket during rollout to the launch pad at Space Launch Complex 41. The rocket began its move from the Vertical Integration Facility at 8 a.m. EST and arrived at the pad at 8:40 a.m. Liftoff is planned during a launch window which extends from 10:02 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. EST on Nov. 26. MSL's components include a car-sized rover, Curiosity, which has 10 science instruments designed to search for signs of life, including methane, and help determine if the gas is from a biological or geological source. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7911

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- On Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, the payload fairing protecting NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) stands atop the 197-foot-tall United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket, which is ready to roll from the Vertical Integration Facility (VIF) to the launch pad at Space Launch Complex 41. The rocket began its move from the VIF at 8 a.m. EST and arrived at the pad at 8:40 a.m. Liftoff is planned during a launch window which extends from 10:02 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. EST on Nov. 26. MSL's components include a car-sized rover, Curiosity, which has 10 science instruments designed to search for signs of life, including methane, and help determine if the gas is from a biological or geological source. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7905

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – From left, Lars Perkins, chair of the Education and Public Outreach Committee of the NASA Advisory Council; former astronaut Leland Melvin, NASA associate administrator for Education; Will.i.am, entertainer and member of The Black Eyed Peas; and NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver talk to the participants of a NASA Tweetup in a tent set up at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Press Site in Florida during prelaunch activities for the agency’s Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) launch. Participants in the Tweetup are given the opportunity to listen to agency briefings, tour locations on the center normally off limits to visitors, and get a close-up view of Space Launch Complex-41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The tweeters will share their experiences with followers through the social networking site Twitter. The MSL mission will pioneer precision landing technology and a sky-crane touchdown to place a car-sized rover, Curiosity, near the foot of a mountain inside Gale Crater on Aug. 6, 2012. During a nearly two-year prime mission after landing, the rover will investigate whether the region has ever offered conditions favorable for microbial life, including the chemical ingredients for life. Liftoff of MSL aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from pad 41 is planned during a launch window which extends from 10:02 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. EST on Nov. 26. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7957

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – From left, Lars Perkins, chair of the Education and Public Outreach Committee of the NASA Advisory Council; former astronaut Leland Melvin, NASA associate administrator for Education; Will.i.am, entertainer and member of  The Black Eyed Peas; and NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver talk to the participants of a NASA Tweetup in a tent set up at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Press Site in Florida during prelaunch activities for the agency’s Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) launch.  Participants in the Tweetup are given the opportunity to listen to agency briefings, tour locations on the center normally off limits to visitors, and get a close-up view of Space Launch Complex-41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The tweeters will share their experiences with followers through the social networking site Twitter. The MSL mission will pioneer precision landing technology and a sky-crane touchdown to place a car-sized rover, Curiosity, near the foot of a mountain inside Gale Crater on Aug. 6, 2012. During a nearly two-year prime mission after landing, the rover will investigate whether the region has ever offered conditions favorable for microbial life, including the chemical ingredients for life.  Liftoff of MSL aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from pad 41 is planned during a launch window which extends from 10:02 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. EST on Nov. 26. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7957
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – From left, Lars Perkins, chair of the Education and Public Outreach Committee of the NASA Advisory Council; former astronaut Leland Melvin, NASA associate administrator for Education; Will.i.am, entertainer and member of The Black Eyed Peas; and NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver talk to the participants of a NASA Tweetup in a tent set up at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Press Site in Florida during prelaunch activities for the agency’s Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) launch. Participants in the Tweetup are given the opportunity to listen to agency briefings, tour locations on the center normally off limits to visitors, and get a close-up view of Space Launch Complex-41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The tweeters will share their experiences with followers through the social networking site Twitter. The MSL mission will pioneer precision landing technology and a sky-crane touchdown to place a car-sized rover, Curiosity, near the foot of a mountain inside Gale Crater on Aug. 6, 2012. During a nearly two-year prime mission after landing, the rover will investigate whether the region has ever offered conditions favorable for microbial life, including the chemical ingredients for life. Liftoff of MSL aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from pad 41 is planned during a launch window which extends from 10:02 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. EST on Nov. 26. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7957

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver addresses the participants of a NASA Tweetup in a tent set up at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Press Site in Florida during prelaunch activities for the agency’s Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) launch. Former astronaut Leland Melvin, NASA associate administrator for Education, looks on at left. Participants in the Tweetup are given the opportunity to listen to agency briefings, tour locations on the center normally off limits to visitors, and get a close-up view of Space Launch Complex-41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The tweeters will share their experiences with followers through the social networking site Twitter. The MSL mission will pioneer precision landing technology and a sky-crane touchdown to place a car-sized rover, Curiosity, near the foot of a mountain inside Gale Crater on Aug. 6, 2012. During a nearly two-year prime mission after landing, the rover will investigate whether the region has ever offered conditions favorable for microbial life, including the chemical ingredients for life. Liftoff of MSL aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from pad 41 is planned during a launch window which extends from 10:02 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. EST on Nov. 26. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7955

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – From left, Yves Lamothe, lead systems engineer for the 21st Century Ground Systems Program at NASA Kennedy Space Center; NASA Administrator Charles Bolden; Will.i.am, entertainer and member of The Black Eyed Peas; and former astronaut Leland Melvin, NASA associate administrator for Education, take part in a Tweetup at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Press Site in Florida during prelaunch activities for the agency’s Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) launch. Behind them, the countdown clock ticks off the seconds to launch. Participants in the Tweetup are given the opportunity to listen to agency briefings, tour locations on the center normally off limits to visitors, and get a close-up view of Space Launch Complex-41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The tweeters will share their experiences with followers through the social networking site Twitter. The MSL mission will pioneer precision landing technology and a sky-crane touchdown to place a car-sized rover, Curiosity, near the foot of a mountain inside Gale Crater on Aug. 6, 2012. During a nearly two-year prime mission after landing, the rover will investigate whether the region has ever offered conditions favorable for microbial life, including the chemical ingredients for life. Liftoff of MSL aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from pad 41 is planned during a launch window which extends from 10:02 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. EST on Nov. 26. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7952

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – From left, Yves Lamothe, lead systems engineer for the 21st Century Ground Systems Program at NASA Kennedy Space Center; NASA Administrator Charles Bolden; Will.i.am, entertainer and member of The Black Eyed Peas; and former astronaut Leland Melvin, NASA associate administrator for Education, take part in a Tweetup at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Press Site in Florida during prelaunch activities for the agency’s Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) launch.  Behind them, the countdown clock ticks off the seconds to launch.  Participants in the Tweetup are given the opportunity to listen to agency briefings, tour locations on the center normally off limits to visitors, and get a close-up view of Space Launch Complex-41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The tweeters will share their experiences with followers through the social networking site Twitter. The MSL mission will pioneer precision landing technology and a sky-crane touchdown to place a car-sized rover, Curiosity, near the foot of a mountain inside Gale Crater on Aug. 6, 2012. During a nearly two-year prime mission after landing, the rover will investigate whether the region has ever offered conditions favorable for microbial life, including the chemical ingredients for life.  Liftoff of MSL aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from pad 41 is planned during a launch window which extends from 10:02 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. EST on Nov. 26. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7952
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – From left, Yves Lamothe, lead systems engineer for the 21st Century Ground Systems Program at NASA Kennedy Space Center; NASA Administrator Charles Bolden; Will.i.am, entertainer and member of The Black Eyed Peas; and former astronaut Leland Melvin, NASA associate administrator for Education, take part in a Tweetup at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Press Site in Florida during prelaunch activities for the agency’s Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) launch. Behind them, the countdown clock ticks off the seconds to launch. Participants in the Tweetup are given the opportunity to listen to agency briefings, tour locations on the center normally off limits to visitors, and get a close-up view of Space Launch Complex-41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The tweeters will share their experiences with followers through the social networking site Twitter. The MSL mission will pioneer precision landing technology and a sky-crane touchdown to place a car-sized rover, Curiosity, near the foot of a mountain inside Gale Crater on Aug. 6, 2012. During a nearly two-year prime mission after landing, the rover will investigate whether the region has ever offered conditions favorable for microbial life, including the chemical ingredients for life. Liftoff of MSL aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from pad 41 is planned during a launch window which extends from 10:02 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. EST on Nov. 26. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7952

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Tweetup participants hear a presentation by Expedition 25 astronaut Doug Wheelock in a tent set up at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Press Site in Florida during prelaunch activities for the agency’s Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) launch. Participants in the Tweetup are given the opportunity to listen to agency briefings, tour locations on the center normally off limits to visitors, and get a close-up view of Space Launch Complex-41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The tweeters will share their experiences with followers through the social networking site Twitter. The MSL mission will pioneer precision landing technology and a sky-crane touchdown to place a car-sized rover, Curiosity, near the foot of a mountain inside Gale Crater on Aug. 6, 2012. During a nearly two-year prime mission after landing, the rover will investigate whether the region has ever offered conditions favorable for microbial life, including the chemical ingredients for life. Liftoff of MSL aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from pad 41 is planned during a launch window which extends from 10:02 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. EST on Nov. 26. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7945

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA Kennedy Space Center's Press Site in Florida, participants in NASA's Tweetup photograph the launch of the agency's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) from the turn basin. The tweeters will share their experiences with followers through the social networking site Twitter. The 197-foot-tall United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket lifted off Space Launch Complex-41 on neighboring Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at 10:02 a.m. EST at the opening of the launch window. MSL's components include a car-sized rover, Curiosity, which has 10 science instruments designed to search for signs of life, including methane, and help determine if the gas is from a biological or geological source. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7966

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Participants of a NASA Tweetup pose for a group portrait at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Press Site in Florida during prelaunch activities for the agency’s Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) launch. Behind them, the countdown clock ticks off the seconds to launch. Participants in the Tweetup are given the opportunity to listen to agency briefings, tour locations on the center normally off limits to visitors, and get a close-up view of Space Launch Complex-41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The tweeters will share their experiences with followers through the social networking site Twitter. The MSL mission will pioneer precision landing technology and a sky-crane touchdown to place a car-sized rover, Curiosity, near the foot of a mountain inside Gale Crater on Aug. 6, 2012. During a nearly two-year prime mission after landing, the rover will investigate whether the region has ever offered conditions favorable for microbial life, including the chemical ingredients for life. Liftoff of MSL aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from pad 41 is planned during a launch window which extends from 10:02 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. EST on Nov. 26. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7951

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Expedition 25 astronaut Doug Wheelock talks to the participants of a NASA Tweetup in a tent set up at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Press Site in Florida during prelaunch activities for the agency’s Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) launch. Participants in the Tweetup are given the opportunity to listen to agency briefings, tour locations on the center normally off limits to visitors, and get a close-up view of Space Launch Complex-41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The tweeters will share their experiences with followers through the social networking site Twitter. The MSL mission will pioneer precision landing technology and a sky-crane touchdown to place a car-sized rover, Curiosity, near the foot of a mountain inside Gale Crater on Aug. 6, 2012. During a nearly two-year prime mission after landing, the rover will investigate whether the region has ever offered conditions favorable for microbial life, including the chemical ingredients for life. Liftoff of MSL aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from pad 41 is planned during a launch window which extends from 10:02 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. EST on Nov. 26. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7946

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver addresses the participants of a NASA Tweetup in a tent set up at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Press Site in Florida during prelaunch activities for the agency’s Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) launch. Participants in the Tweetup are given the opportunity to listen to agency briefings, tour locations on the center normally off limits to visitors, and get a close-up view of Space Launch Complex-41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The tweeters will share their experiences with followers through the social networking site Twitter. The MSL mission will pioneer precision landing technology and a sky-crane touchdown to place a car-sized rover, Curiosity, near the foot of a mountain inside Gale Crater on Aug. 6, 2012. During a nearly two-year prime mission after landing, the rover will investigate whether the region has ever offered conditions favorable for microbial life, including the chemical ingredients for life. Liftoff of MSL aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from pad 41 is planned during a launch window which extends from 10:02 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. EST on Nov. 26. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7954

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – From left, former astronaut Leland Melvin, NASA associate administrator for Education; Will.i.am, entertainer and member of The Black Eyed Peas; and NASA Deputy Administrator Lori Garver share a light moment with the participants of a NASA Tweetup in a tent set up at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Press Site in Florida during prelaunch activities for the agency’s Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) launch. Participants in the Tweetup are given the opportunity to listen to agency briefings, tour locations on the center normally off limits to visitors, and get a close-up view of Space Launch Complex-41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The tweeters will share their experiences with followers through the social networking site Twitter. The MSL mission will pioneer precision landing technology and a sky-crane touchdown to place a car-sized rover, Curiosity, near the foot of a mountain inside Gale Crater on Aug. 6, 2012. During a nearly two-year prime mission after landing, the rover will investigate whether the region has ever offered conditions favorable for microbial life, including the chemical ingredients for life. Liftoff of MSL aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from pad 41 is planned during a launch window which extends from 10:02 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. EST on Nov. 26. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7956

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA Kennedy Space Center's Press Site in Florida, participants in NASA's Tweetup photograph the launch of the agency's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) as the countdown clock ticks off the seconds. The tweeters will share their experiences with followers through the social networking site Twitter. The 197-foot-tall United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket lifted off Space Launch Complex-41 on neighboring Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at 10:02 a.m. EST at the opening of the launch window. MSL's components include a car-sized rover, Curiosity, which has 10 science instruments designed to search for signs of life, including methane, and help determine if the gas is from a biological or geological source. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7968

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Administrator Charles Bolden addresses the participants of a NASA Tweetup in a tent set up at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Press Site in Florida during prelaunch activities for the agency’s Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) launch. Participants in the Tweetup are given the opportunity to listen to agency briefings, tour locations on the center normally off limits to visitors, and get a close-up view of Space Launch Complex-41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The tweeters will share their experiences with followers through the social networking site Twitter. The MSL mission will pioneer precision landing technology and a sky-crane touchdown to place a car-sized rover, Curiosity, near the foot of a mountain inside Gale Crater on Aug. 6, 2012. During a nearly two-year prime mission after landing, the rover will investigate whether the region has ever offered conditions favorable for microbial life, including the chemical ingredients for life. Liftoff of MSL aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from pad 41 is planned during a launch window which extends from 10:02 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. EST on Nov. 26. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7949

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA Kennedy Space Center's Press Site in Florida, participants in NASA's Tweetup photograph the launch of the agency's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) as it races through the clouds. The tweeters will share their experiences with followers through the social networking site Twitter. The 197-foot-tall United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket lifted off Space Launch Complex-41 on neighboring Cape Canaveral Air Force Station at 10:02 a.m. EST at the opening of the launch window. MSL's components include a car-sized rover, Curiosity, which has 10 science instruments designed to search for signs of life, including methane, and help determine if the gas is from a biological or geological source. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7969

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Television personality Bill Nye the Science Guy talks to the participants of a NASA Tweetup in a tent set up at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Press Site in Florida during prelaunch activities for the agency’s Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) launch. Participants in the Tweetup are given the opportunity to listen to agency briefings, tour locations on the center normally off limits to visitors, and get a close-up view of Space Launch Complex-41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The tweeters will share their experiences with followers through the social networking site Twitter. The MSL mission will pioneer precision landing technology and a sky-crane touchdown to place a car-sized rover, Curiosity, near the foot of a mountain inside Gale Crater on Aug. 6, 2012. During a nearly two-year prime mission after landing, the rover will investigate whether the region has ever offered conditions favorable for microbial life, including the chemical ingredients for life. Liftoff of MSL aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from pad 41 is planned during a launch window which extends from 10:02 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. EST on Nov. 26. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7948

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Administrator Charles Bolden addresses the participants of a NASA Tweetup in a tent set up at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Press Site in Florida during prelaunch activities for the agency’s Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) launch. Participants in the Tweetup are given the opportunity to listen to agency briefings, tour locations on the center normally off limits to visitors, and get a close-up view of Space Launch Complex-41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The tweeters will share their experiences with followers through the social networking site Twitter. The MSL mission will pioneer precision landing technology and a sky-crane touchdown to place a car-sized rover, Curiosity, near the foot of a mountain inside Gale Crater on Aug. 6, 2012. During a nearly two-year prime mission after landing, the rover will investigate whether the region has ever offered conditions favorable for microbial life, including the chemical ingredients for life. Liftoff of MSL aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from pad 41 is planned during a launch window which extends from 10:02 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. EST on Nov. 26. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7950

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Television personality Bill Nye the Science Guy talks to the participants of a NASA Tweetup in a tent set up at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Press Site in Florida during prelaunch activities for the agency’s Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) launch. Participants in the Tweetup are given the opportunity to listen to agency briefings, tour locations on the center normally off limits to visitors, and get a close-up view of Space Launch Complex-41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The tweeters will share their experiences with followers through the social networking site Twitter. The MSL mission will pioneer precision landing technology and a sky-crane touchdown to place a car-sized rover, Curiosity, near the foot of a mountain inside Gale Crater on Aug. 6, 2012. During a nearly two-year prime mission after landing, the rover will investigate whether the region has ever offered conditions favorable for microbial life, including the chemical ingredients for life. Liftoff of MSL aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket from pad 41 is planned during a launch window which extends from 10:02 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. EST on Nov. 26. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-7947

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Inside Orbiter Processing Facility-1 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians monitor the progress as space shuttle Discovery’s fuel cells are drained of all fluids. After all of the coolant is removed, the fuel cells will be returned to their previous location within Discovery’s mid-body. The hydrogen and oxygen dewars which feed reactants to the fuel cells remain in Discovery’s mid-body and have been purged with inert gases and vented down. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing of shuttle Discovery. Discovery is being prepared for display at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum, Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/shuttle. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-8060

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Inside Orbiter Processing Facility-1 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians monitor the progress as space shuttle Discovery’s fuel cells are drained of all fluids. After all of the coolant is removed, the fuel cells will be returned to their previous location within Discovery’s mid-body. The hydrogen and oxygen dewars which feed reactants to the fuel cells remain in Discovery’s mid-body and have been purged with inert gases and vented down. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing of shuttle Discovery. Discovery is being prepared for display at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum, Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/shuttle. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-8062

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Inside Orbiter Processing Facility-1 at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians prepare space shuttle Discovery’s three fuel cells to be drained of all fluids. After all of the coolant is removed, the fuel cells will be returned to their previous location within Discovery’s mid-body. The hydrogen and oxygen dewars which feed reactants to the fuel cells remain in Discovery’s mid-body and have been purged with inert gases and vented down. The work is part of the Space Shuttle Program’s transition and retirement processing of shuttle Discovery. Discovery is being prepared for display at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum, Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/shuttle. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-8058

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The mobile launcher, or ML, begins to move off Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Nov. 30, 2011. Data on the ML was collected from structural and functional engineering tests and will be used for the next phases of construction overseen by NASA’s 21st Century Ground Systems Program. The 355-foot-tall ML structure, which took about two years to construct, is being modified to support NASA’s Space Launch System, the heavy-lift rocket that will launch astronauts farther into space than ever before. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-8081

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The mobile launcher, or ML, begins to move off Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Nov. 30, 2011. Data on the ML was collected from structural and functional engineering tests and will be used for the next phases of construction overseen by NASA’s 21st Century Ground Systems Program. The 355-foot-tall ML structure, which took about two years to construct, is being modified to support NASA’s Space Launch System, the heavy-lift rocket that will launch astronauts farther into space than ever before. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-8083