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CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Two gators sunbathe just north of the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Kennedy coexists with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, habitat to more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fish and 65 amphibians and reptiles. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-1025

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A Pied-billed grebe wades through brackish water just north of the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Kennedy coexists with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, habitat to more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fish and 65 amphibians and reptiles. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-1019

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Great white and snowy white egrets gather just north of the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Kennedy coexists with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, habitat to more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fish and 65 amphibians and reptiles. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-1031

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- An Egretta Heron, also known as a Tricolored Heron, wades through water just north of the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Kennedy coexists with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, habitat to more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fish and 65 amphibians and reptiles. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-1030

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A roseate spoonbill wades through water just north of the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Kennedy coexists with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, habitat to more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fish and 65 amphibians and reptiles. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-1029

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Finishing touches adorn the second-floor lobby of the new Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The artwork on the wall was produced by Greg Lee, a graphics specialist with Abacus Technology Corp., and depicts the mystery of nature with a photo of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The environmentally friendly facility is slated to be NASA's second Platinum-rated by the U.S. Green Building Council's (USGBC) Leadership in Environmental and Energy Design (LEED) certification system. It will be the space agency's first net-zero facility, which means it will produce enough energy onsite from renewable sources to offset what it requires to operate. The facility consists of a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy, and a single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-1056

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Finishing touches adorn the second-floor conference room of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Artwork for the conference room was produced by Greg Lee, a graphics specialist with Abacus Technology Corp., with input from the facility's future occupants. The environmentally friendly facility is slated to be NASA's second Platinum-rated by the U.S. Green Building Council's (USGBC) Leadership in Environmental and Energy Design (LEED) certification system. It will be the space agency's first net-zero facility, which means it will produce enough energy onsite from renewable sources to offset what it requires to operate. The facility consists of a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy, and a single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-1061

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Finishing touches adorn the second-floor conference room of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Artwork for the conference room was produced by Greg Lee, a graphics specialist with Abacus Technology Corp., with input from the facility's future occupants. The environmentally friendly facility is slated to be NASA's second Platinum-rated by the U.S. Green Building Council's (USGBC) Leadership in Environmental and Energy Design (LEED) certification system. It will be the space agency's first net-zero facility, which means it will produce enough energy onsite from renewable sources to offset what it requires to operate. The facility consists of a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy, and a single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-1059

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Finishing touches adorn the second-floor lobby of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. At right, are recycled firing room windows that are set at the same angle and orientation as they were in Kennedy's Launch Control Center, looking out toward Launch Pads 39A and B. The environmentally friendly facility is slated to be NASA's second Platinum-rated by the U.S. Green Building Council's (USGBC) Leadership in Environmental and Energy Design (LEED) certification system. It will be the space agency's first net-zero facility, which means it will produce enough energy onsite from renewable sources to offset what it requires to operate. The facility consists of a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy, and a single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-1057

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Finishing touches adorn the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Artwork for the facility was produced by Greg Lee, a graphics specialist with Abacus Technology Corp., with input from the facility's future occupants. The environmentally friendly facility is slated to be NASA's second Platinum-rated by the U.S. Green Building Council's (USGBC) Leadership in Environmental and Energy Design (LEED) certification system. It will be the space agency's first net-zero facility, which means it will produce enough energy onsite from renewable sources to offset what it requires to operate. The facility consists of a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy, and a single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-1060

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Finishing touches adorn the second-floor conference room of the Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The environmentally friendly facility is slated to be NASA's second Platinum-rated by the U.S. Green Building Council's (USGBC) Leadership in Environmental and Energy Design (LEED) certification system. It will be the space agency's first net-zero facility, which means it will produce enough energy onsite from renewable sources to offset what it requires to operate. The facility consists of a two-story administrative building to house managers, mechanics and technicians who fuel spacecraft at Kennedy, and a single-story shop to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-1058

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In accordance with a Presidential Proclamation, the American Flag in the Launch Complex 39 area of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida flies at half-staff to honor U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and others who were wounded or killed during a shooting spree in Tucson, Arizona. This flag and all American Flags at U.S. military and government installations across the country and abroad will remain at half-staff until sunset on Jan. 14. Giffords is the wife of NASA astronaut Mark Kelly, who is scheduled to command space shuttle Endeavour's last mission, STS-134, to the International Space Station later this year. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-1066

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In accordance with a Presidential Proclamation, the American Flag in the Launch Complex 39 area of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida flies at half-staff to honor U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords and others who were wounded or killed during a shooting spree in Tucson, Arizona. This flag and all American Flags at U.S. military and government installations across the country and abroad will remain at half-staff until sunset on Jan. 14. Giffords is the wife of NASA astronaut Mark Kelly, who is scheduled to command space shuttle Endeavour's last mission, STS-134, to the International Space Station later this year. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-1065

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida hosts a ribbon-cutting ceremony for its new environmentally friendly Propellants North Administrative and Maintenance Facility. This is a view of the parking lot where a solar-powered charging canopy is available for powering government or privately owned electric vehicles. Propellants North consists of two buildings, one to store cryogenic fuel transfer equipment and one to house personnel who support fueling spacecraft. The recently rebuilt buildings will be NASA's first carbon neutral facility, which means it will produce enough energy on site from renewable sources to offset what it requires to operate. The facility also will reach for the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Environmental and Energy Design (LEED) Platinum status, which is the highest LEED rating. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-1144

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Discovery is illuminated by bright xenon lights on Launch Pad 39A after the rotating service structure was moved away. The structure provides weather protection and access to the shuttle while it awaits lift off on the pad. RSS "rollback," as it's called, began at 8:02 p.m. EST on Feb. 23 and wrapped up at 8:37 p.m. Scheduled to lift off Feb. 24 at 4:50 p.m. EST, Discovery and its six-member crew will deliver the Permanent Multipurpose Module, packed with supplies and critical spare parts, as well as Robonaut 2, the dexterous humanoid astronaut helper, to the International Space Station. Discovery, which will fly its 39th mission, is scheduled to be retired following STS-133. This will be the 133rd Space Shuttle Program mission and the 35th shuttle voyage to the space station. For more information on the STS-133 mission, visit www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts133/. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-1586

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Discovery is illuminated by bright xenon lights on Launch Pad 39A after the rotating service structure was moved away. The structure provides weather protection and access to the shuttle while it awaits lift off on the pad. RSS "rollback," as it's called, began at 8:02 p.m. EST on Feb. 23 and wrapped up at 8:37 p.m. Scheduled to lift off Feb. 24 at 4:50 p.m. EST, Discovery and its six-member crew will deliver the Permanent Multipurpose Module, packed with supplies and critical spare parts, as well as Robonaut 2, the dexterous humanoid astronaut helper, to the International Space Station. Discovery, which will fly its 39th mission, is scheduled to be retired following STS-133. This will be the 133rd Space Shuttle Program mission and the 35th shuttle voyage to the space station. For more information on the STS-133 mission, visit www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts133/. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-1589

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Discovery is illuminated by bright xenon lights on Launch Pad 39A after the rotating service structure was moved away. The structure provides weather protection and access to the shuttle while it awaits lift off on the pad. RSS "rollback," as it's called, began at 8:02 p.m. EST on Feb. 23 and wrapped up at 8:37 p.m. Scheduled to lift off Feb. 24 at 4:50 p.m. EST, Discovery and its six-member crew will deliver the Permanent Multipurpose Module, packed with supplies and critical spare parts, as well as Robonaut 2, the dexterous humanoid astronaut helper, to the International Space Station. Discovery, which will fly its 39th mission, is scheduled to be retired following STS-133. This will be the 133rd Space Shuttle Program mission and the 35th shuttle voyage to the space station. For more information on the STS-133 mission, visit www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts133/. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-1588

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Discovery is illuminated by bright xenon lights on Launch Pad 39A after the rotating service structure was moved away. The structure provides weather protection and access to the shuttle while it awaits lift off on the pad. RSS "rollback," as it's called, began at 8:02 p.m. EST on Feb. 23 and wrapped up at 8:37 p.m. Scheduled to lift off Feb. 24 at 4:50 p.m. EST, Discovery and its six-member crew will deliver the Permanent Multipurpose Module, packed with supplies and critical spare parts, as well as Robonaut 2, the dexterous humanoid astronaut helper, to the International Space Station. Discovery, which will fly its 39th mission, is scheduled to be retired following STS-133. This will be the 133rd Space Shuttle Program mission and the 35th shuttle voyage to the space station. For more information on the STS-133 mission, visit www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts133/. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-1587

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- This is a 3-D image of space shuttle Discovery illuminated by bright xenon lights on Launch Pad 39Aat NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The rotating service structure that provides weather protection and access to the shuttle while it awaits lift off on the pad was just moved away in preparation for launch. To view this image, use green and magenta 3-D glasses. Scheduled to lift off Feb. 24 at 4:50 p.m. EST, Discovery and its six-member crew will deliver the Permanent Multipurpose Module, packed with supplies and critical spare parts, as well as Robonaut 2, the dexterous humanoid astronaut helper, to the International Space Station. Discovery, which will fly its 39th mission, is scheduled to be retired following STS-133. This will be the 133rd Space Shuttle Program mission and the 35th shuttle voyage to the space station. For more information on the STS-133 mission, visit www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts133/. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2053

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- This panoramic image shows space shuttle Endeavour in the transfer aisle of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, where workers have attached an overhead crane to the spacecraft. The crane will lift Endeavour into a high bay where it will be attached to its external fuel tank and solid rocket boosters for its final mission, STS-134. Endeavour and its STS-134 crew will deliver the Express Logistics Carrier-3, Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, a high-pressure gas tank, additional spare parts for Dextre and micrometeoroid debris shields to the International Space Station. Launch is targeted for April 19 at 7:48 p.m. EDT. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-1928

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the transfer aisle of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, this image shows the rear of space shuttle Endeavour and it covered three main engines as a worker attaches an overhead crane. The crane will lift the spacecraft into a high bay where it will be attached to its external fuel tank and solid rocket boosters for its final mission, STS-134. Endeavour and its STS-134 crew will deliver the Express Logistics Carrier-3, Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, a high-pressure gas tank, additional spare parts for Dextre and micrometeoroid debris shields to the International Space Station. Launch is targeted for April 19 at 7:48 p.m. EDT. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-1925

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the transfer aisle of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, this image shows the rear of space shuttle Endeavour and it covered three main engines as a worker attaches an overhead crane. The crane will lift the spacecraft into a high bay where it will be attached to its external fuel tank and solid rocket boosters for its final mission, STS-134. Endeavour and its STS-134 crew will deliver the Express Logistics Carrier-3, Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, a high-pressure gas tank, additional spare parts for Dextre and micrometeoroid debris shields to the International Space Station. Launch is targeted for April 19 at 7:48 p.m. EDT. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-1924

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the transfer aisle of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers attach an overhead crane to the rear of space shuttle Endeavour. The crane will lift the spacecraft into a high bay where it will be attached to its external fuel tank and solid rocket boosters for its final mission, STS-134. Endeavour and its STS-134 crew will deliver the Express Logistics Carrier-3, Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, a high-pressure gas tank, additional spare parts for Dextre and micrometeoroid debris shields to the International Space Station. Launch is targeted for April 19 at 7:48 p.m. EDT. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-1926

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers accompany space shuttle Endeavour as it is backed out of Orbiter Processing Facility-2 for its move, or "rollover," to the Vehicle Assembly Building. Endeavour and its STS-134 crew will deliver the Express Logistics Carrier-3, Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, spare parts, a high-pressure gas tank, additional spare parts for Dextre and micrometeoroid debris shields to the International Space Station. Launch is targeted for April 19 at 7:48 p.m. EDT. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-1799

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the transfer aisle of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a worker attaches an overhead crane to space shuttle Endeavour. The crane will lift the spacecraft into a high bay where it will be attached to its external fuel tank and solid rocket boosters for its final mission, STS-134. Endeavour and its STS-134 crew will deliver the Express Logistics Carrier-3, Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, a high-pressure gas tank, additional spare parts for Dextre and micrometeoroid debris shields to the International Space Station. Launch is targeted for April 19 at 7:48 p.m. EDT. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-1923

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the transfer aisle of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a worker attaches an overhead crane to space shuttle Endeavour. The crane will lift the spacecraft into a high bay where it will be attached to its external fuel tank and solid rocket boosters for its final mission, STS-134. Endeavour and its STS-134 crew will deliver the Express Logistics Carrier-3, Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, a high-pressure gas tank, additional spare parts for Dextre and micrometeoroid debris shields to the International Space Station. Launch is targeted for April 19 at 7:48 p.m. EDT. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-1927

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A large yellow, metal sling begins to lower shuttle Endeavour toward its external fuel tank and solid rocket boosters in a high bay of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Endeavour is targeted to roll out to Kennedy's Launch Pad 39A for its final mission, STS-134, on March 9. Endeavour and the six-member crew will deliver the Express Logistics Carrier-3, Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2 (AMS), a high-pressure gas tank, additional spare parts for the Dextre robotic helper and micrometeoroid debris shields to the International Space Station. Endeavour's final launch is targeted for April 19 at 7:48 p.m. EDT. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-1989

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A large yellow, metal sling lifts shuttle Endeavour from the transfer aisle into a high bay of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In the bay, the shuttle will be attached to its external fuel tank and solid rocket boosters. Endeavour is targeted to roll out to Kennedy's Launch Pad 39A for its final mission, STS-134, on March 9. Endeavour and the six-member crew will deliver the Express Logistics Carrier-3, Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2 (AMS), a high-pressure gas tank, additional spare parts for the Dextre robotic helper and micrometeoroid debris shields to the International Space Station. Endeavour's final launch is targeted for April 19 at 7:48 p.m. EDT. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-1985

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- This is a 3-D image of space shuttle Endeavour as it is outfitted with a metal sling that will lift the spacecraft from the transfer aisle into a high bay of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In the bay, the shuttle will be attached to its external fuel tank and solid rocket boosters. Endeavour is targeted to roll out to Kennedy's Launch Pad 39A for its final mission, STS-134, on March 9. To view this image, use green and magenta 3-D glasses. Endeavour and six-member crew will deliver the Express Logistics Carrier-3, Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2 (AMS), a high-pressure gas tank, additional spare parts for the Dextre robotic helper and micrometeoroid debris shields to the International Space Station. Endeavour's final launch is targeted for April 19 at 7:48 p.m. EDT. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2056

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A large yellow, metal sling lifts shuttle Endeavour from the transfer aisle into a high bay of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In the bay, the shuttle will be attached to its external fuel tank and solid rocket boosters. Endeavour is targeted to roll out to Kennedy's Launch Pad 39A for its final mission, STS-134, on March 9. Endeavour and the six-member crew will deliver the Express Logistics Carrier-3, Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2 (AMS), a high-pressure gas tank, additional spare parts for the Dextre robotic helper and micrometeoroid debris shields to the International Space Station. Endeavour's final launch is targeted for April 19 at 7:48 p.m. EDT. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-1988

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- This is a 3-D image of space shuttle Endeavour as it is outfitted with a metal sling that will lift the spacecraft from the transfer aisle into a high bay of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In the bay, the shuttle will be attached to its external fuel tank and solid rocket boosters. Endeavour is targeted to roll out to Kennedy's Launch Pad 39A for its final mission, STS-134, on March 9. To view this image, use green and magenta 3-D glasses. Endeavour and six-member crew will deliver the Express Logistics Carrier-3, Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2 (AMS), a high-pressure gas tank, additional spare parts for the Dextre robotic helper and micrometeoroid debris shields to the International Space Station. Endeavour's final launch is targeted for April 19 at 7:48 p.m. EDT. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2055

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Members of the media snap photos as a large yellow, metal sling lifts shuttle Endeavour from the transfer aisle into a high bay of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In the bay, the shuttle will be attached to its external fuel tank and solid rocket boosters. Endeavour is targeted to roll out to Kennedy's Launch Pad 39A for its final mission, STS-134, on March 9. Endeavour and the six-member crew will deliver the Express Logistics Carrier-3, Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2 (AMS), a high-pressure gas tank, additional spare parts for the Dextre robotic helper and micrometeoroid debris shields to the International Space Station. Endeavour's final launch is targeted for April 19 at 7:48 p.m. EDT. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-1987

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A large yellow, metal sling lifts shuttle Endeavour from the transfer aisle into a high bay of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In the bay, the shuttle will be attached to its external fuel tank and solid rocket boosters. Endeavour is targeted to roll out to Kennedy's Launch Pad 39A for its final mission, STS-134, on March 9. Endeavour and the six-member crew will deliver the Express Logistics Carrier-3, Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2 (AMS), a high-pressure gas tank, additional spare parts for the Dextre robotic helper and micrometeoroid debris shields to the International Space Station. Endeavour's final launch is targeted for April 19 at 7:48 p.m. EDT. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-1984

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Bathed in xenon lights, space shuttle Endeavour makes its nighttime journey from the Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Riding atop a crawler-transporter attached to its external fuel tank and solid rocket boosters, Endeavour's 3.4-mile trek, known as "rollout," began at 7:56 p.m. EST and will take about seven hours to complete. This is the final scheduled rollout for Endeavour. Endeavour and its six-member crew will deliver the Express Logistics Carrier-3, Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2 (AMS), a high-pressure gas tank, additional spare parts for the Dextre robotic helper and micrometeoroid debris shields to the International Space Station on the shuttle's final spaceflight, STS-134. Launch is targeted for 7:48 p.m. EDT April 19. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2232

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Employees and their friends and families are on hand to witness space shuttle Endeavour, illuminated by xenon lights, on its nighttime journey from the Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Riding atop a crawler-transporter attached to its external fuel tank and solid rocket boosters, Endeavour's 3.4-mile trek, known as "rollout," began at 7:56 p.m. EST and will take about seven hours to complete. This is the final scheduled rollout for Endeavour. Endeavour and its six-member crew will deliver the Express Logistics Carrier-3, Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2 (AMS), a high-pressure gas tank, additional spare parts for the Dextre robotic helper and micrometeoroid debris shields to the International Space Station on the shuttle's final spaceflight, STS-134. Launch is targeted for 7:48 p.m. EDT April 19. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2234

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Space shuttle Endeavour, secured on its mobile launcher platform, pulls away from the Vehicle Assembly Building for its nighttime journey to Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Riding atop a crawler-transporter attached to its external fuel tank and solid rocket boosters, Endeavour's 3.4-mile trek, known as "rollout," began at 7:56 p.m. EST and will take about seven hours to complete. This is the final scheduled rollout for Endeavour. Endeavour and its six-member crew will deliver the Express Logistics Carrier-3, Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2 (AMS), a high-pressure gas tank, additional spare parts for the Dextre robotic helper and micrometeoroid debris shields to the International Space Station on the shuttle's final spaceflight, STS-134. Launch is targeted for 7:48 p.m. EDT April 19. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2231

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- This is a 3-D image of the crawler-transporter as it slowly hauls space shuttle Endeavour from the Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The gigantic tracked mover weighs about 18 million pounds with the space shuttle, two solid rocket boosters, external fuel tank and mobile launcher platform attached. It takes six to eight hours to complete the 3.4-mile trip along crushed Alabama river rock at a speed of about 1 mph. To view this image, use green and magenta 3-D glasses. Endeavour and its six-member STS-134 crew will deliver the Express Logistics Carrier-3, Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2 (AMS), a high-pressure gas tank, additional spare parts for the Dextre robotic helper and micrometeoroid debris shields to the International Space Station. Endeavour's final launch is targeted for April 19 at 7:48 p.m. EDT. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2291

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Bathed in xenon lights, space shuttle Endeavour moves along the crawlerway from the Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39A, illuminated in the background, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Riding atop a crawler-transporter attached to its external fuel tank and solid rocket boosters, Endeavour's 3.4-mile trek, known as "rollout," began at 7:56 p.m. EST and will take about seven hours to complete. This is the final scheduled rollout for Endeavour. Endeavour and its six-member crew will deliver the Express Logistics Carrier-3, Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2 (AMS), a high-pressure gas tank, additional spare parts for the Dextre robotic helper and micrometeoroid debris shields to the International Space Station on the shuttle's final spaceflight, STS-134. Launch is targeted for 7:48 p.m. EDT April 19. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2233

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Space shuttle Endeavour moves through a high bay door of the Vehicle Assembly Building on its mobile launch platform to begin its nighttime journey to Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Riding atop a crawler-transporter attached to its external fuel tank and solid rocket boosters, Endeavour's 3.4-mile trek, known as "rollout," began at 7:56 p.m. EST and will take about seven hours to complete. This is the final scheduled rollout for Endeavour. Endeavour and its six-member crew will deliver the Express Logistics Carrier-3, Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2 (AMS), a high-pressure gas tank, additional spare parts for the Dextre robotic helper and micrometeoroid debris shields to the International Space Station on the shuttle's final spaceflight, STS-134. Launch is targeted for 7:48 p.m. EDT April 19. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2230

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- This is a 3-D image of the crawler-transporter as it slowly hauls space shuttle Endeavour from the Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39A at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The gigantic tracked mover weighs about 18 million pounds with the space shuttle, two solid rocket boosters, external fuel tank and mobile launcher platform attached. It takes six to eight hours to complete the 3.4-mile trip along crushed Alabama river rock at a speed of about 1 mph. To view this image, use green and magenta 3-D glasses. Endeavour and its six-member STS-134 crew will deliver the Express Logistics Carrier-3, Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2 (AMS), a high-pressure gas tank, additional spare parts for the Dextre robotic helper and micrometeoroid debris shields to the International Space Station. Endeavour's final launch is targeted for April 19 at 7:48 p.m. EDT. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2292

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – This panoramic image shows space shuttle Endeavour in place beside the rotating and fixed service structures on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. In the foreground are cameras that will capture the launch of Endeavour on its final mission, STS-134. Endeavour and its six-member crew will deliver the Express Logistics Carrier-3, Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2 (AMS), a high-pressure gas tank, additional spare parts for the Dextre robotic helper and micrometeoroid debris shields to the International Space Station. Endeavour's final launch is targeted for April 19 at 7:48 p.m. EDT. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2293

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A large crane dismantles the fixed service structure (FSS) piece by piece on Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Work to remove the rotating service structure (RSS) also continues at the pad. The FSS and RSS were designed to support the unique needs of the Space Shuttle Program. In 2009, the pad was no longer needed for the shuttle program, so it is being restructured for future use. Its new design will feature a "clean pad" for rockets to come with their own launcher, making it more versatile for a number of vehicles. The transformation also includes the refurbishment of the liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen tanks and the upgrade of about 1.3 million feet of cable. The new lightning protection system, which was in place for the October 2009 launch of Ares I-X, will remain. For information on NASA's future plans, visit www.nasa.gov. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2375

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A large crane dismantles the fixed service structure FSS piece by piece on Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Work to remove the rotating service structure RSS also continues at the pad. The FSS and RSS were designed to support the unique needs of the Space Shuttle Program. In 2009, the pad was no longer needed for the shuttle program, so it is being restructured for future use. Its new design will feature a "clean pad" for rockets to come with their own launcher, making it more versatile for a number of vehicles. The transformation also includes the refurbishment of the liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen tanks and the upgrade of about 1.3 million feet of cable. The new lightning protection system, which was in place for the October 2009 launch of Ares I-X, will remain. For information on NASA's future plans, visit www.nasa.gov. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2372

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A large crane dismantles the fixed service structure FSS piece by piece on Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Work to remove the rotating service structure RSS also continues at the pad. The FSS and RSS were designed to support the unique needs of the Space Shuttle Program. In 2009, the pad was no longer needed for the shuttle program, so it is being restructured for future use. Its new design will feature a "clean pad" for rockets to come with their own launcher, making it more versatile for a number of vehicles. The transformation also includes the refurbishment of the liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen tanks and the upgrade of about 1.3 million feet of cable. The new lightning protection system, which was in place for the October 2009 launch of Ares I-X, will remain. For information on NASA's future plans, visit www.nasa.gov. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2370

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A large crane dismantles the fixed service structure (FSS) piece by piece on Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Work to remove the rotating service structure (RSS) also continues at the pad. The FSS and RSS were designed to support the unique needs of the Space Shuttle Program. In 2009, the pad was no longer needed for the shuttle program, so it is being restructured for future use. Its new design will feature a "clean pad" for rockets to come with their own launcher, making it more versatile for a number of vehicles. The transformation also includes the refurbishment of the liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen tanks and the upgrade of about 1.3 million feet of cable. The new lightning protection system, which was in place for the October 2009 launch of Ares I-X, will remain. For information on NASA's future plans, visit www.nasa.gov. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2373

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A large crane dismantles the fixed service structure (FSS) piece by piece on Launch Pad 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Work to remove the rotating service structure (RSS) also continues at the pad. The FSS and RSS were designed to support the unique needs of the Space Shuttle Program. In 2009, the pad was no longer needed for the shuttle program, so it is being restructured for future use. Its new design will feature a "clean pad" for rockets to come with their own launcher, making it more versatile for a number of vehicles. The transformation also includes the refurbishment of the liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen tanks and the upgrade of about 1.3 million feet of cable. The new lightning protection system, which was in place for the October 2009 launch of Ares I-X, will remain. For information on NASA's future plans, visit www.nasa.gov. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2374

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Boeing Space Operation's STS-134 Payload Flow Manager Bob Hart talks to media with space shuttle Endeavour and its primary payload in the background on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2 (AMS) and Express Logistics Carrier-3 are scheduled to be installed into the shuttle's cargo bay March 25. Endeavour and its six-member STS-134 crew are targeted to lift off April 19 at 7:48 p.m. EDT to deliver the payload to the International Space Station. This is Endeavour's final scheduled mission. For more information visit, www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2407

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - A panoramic photo shows space shuttle Discovery during the main engine removal phase in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The removal is part of Discovery's transition and retirement processing. Work performed on Discovery is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for future public display. NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2614

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- This is a 3-D image of crews in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida using a Hyster forklift to lower one of space shuttle Discovery's main engines after removal for cleaning and inspection. This is part of the spacecraft's transition and retirement processing and work performed on Discovery is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for future public display. To view this image, use green and magenta 3-D glasses. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2736

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, this 3-D image shows space shuttle Discovery's main engines before removeal for cleaning and inspection. The work is part of the spacecraft's transition and retirement processing and is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for future public display. To view this image, use green and magenta 3-D glasses. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2737

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- This 3-D image was taken in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, after crews installed the final tire on space shuttle Discovery. This is part of the spacecraft's transition and retirement processing and work performed on Discovery is expected to help rocket designers build next-generation spacecraft and prepare the shuttle for future public display. To view this image, use green and magenta 3-D glasses. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2738

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-135 Mission Specialist Sandy Magnus is inspecting the mid-deck of shuttle Atlantis. The four-member crew is at Kennedy participating in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), which gives them an opportunity for hands-on training with the spacecraft and familiarization of the payload they'll deliver to the International Space Station. Atlantis and its payload is being prepared for the STS-135 mission, which will deliver the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module packed with supplies and spare parts to the station. Atlantis is targeted to launch June 28, and will be the last shuttle flight for the Space Shuttle Program. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2916

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-135 Mission Specialist Sandy Magnus crawls through a hatch with the aid of technicians while inspecting the mid-deck of shuttle Atlantis. The four-member crew is at Kennedy participating in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), which gives them an opportunity for hands-on training with the spacecraft and familiarization of the payload they'll deliver to the International Space Station. Atlantis and its payload is being prepared for the STS-135 mission, which will deliver the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module packed with supplies and spare parts to the station. Atlantis is targeted to launch June 28, and will be the last shuttle flight for the Space Shuttle Program. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2918

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-135 Mission Specialist Sandy Magnus along with technicians are inspecting the mid-deck of shuttle Atlantis. The four-member crew is at Kennedy participating in the Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), which gives them an opportunity for hands-on training with the spacecraft and familiarization of the payload they'll deliver to the International Space Station. Atlantis and its payload is being prepared for the STS-135 mission, which will deliver the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module packed with supplies and spare parts to the station. Atlantis is targeted to launch June 28, and will be the last shuttle flight for the Space Shuttle Program. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2917

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a technician, garbed in protective wear, commonly known as a 'bunny suit,' carries equipment that will be installed into the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module for shuttle Atlantis' flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis and its payload is being prepared for the STS-135 mission, which will deliver the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module packed with supplies and spare parts to the station. Atlantis is targeted to launch June 28, and will be the last shuttle flight for the Space Shuttle Program. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2837

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a technician, garbed in protective wear, commonly known as a 'bunny suit,' inspects a piece of equipment prior to installation into the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module for shuttle Atlantis' flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis and its payload is being prepared for the STS-135 mission, which will deliver the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module packed with supplies and spare parts to the station. Atlantis is targeted to launch June 28, and will be the last shuttle flight for the Space Shuttle Program. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2843

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians garbed in protective wear, commonly known as 'bunny suits,' install the cargo inside the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module for shuttle Atlantis' flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis and its payload is being prepared for the STS-135 mission, which will deliver the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module packed with supplies and spare parts to the station. Atlantis is targeted to launch June 28, and will be the last shuttle flight for the Space Shuttle Program. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2841

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians garbed in protective wear, commonly known as 'bunny suits,' install the cargo inside the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module for shuttle Atlantis' flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis and its payload is being prepared for the STS-135 mission, which will deliver the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module packed with supplies and spare parts to the station. Atlantis is targeted to launch June 28, and will be the last shuttle flight for the Space Shuttle Program. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2842

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians garbed in protective wear, commonly known as 'bunny suits,' check the protective wrapping of a piece of equipment prior to installation into the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module for shuttle Atlantis' flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis and its payload is being prepared for the STS-135 mission, which will deliver the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module packed with supplies and spare parts to the station. Atlantis is targeted to launch June 28, and will be the last shuttle flight for the Space Shuttle Program. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2840

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians garbed in protective wear, commonly known as 'bunny suits,' prepare to install the cargo inside the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module for shuttle Atlantis' flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis and its payload is being prepared for the STS-135 mission, which will deliver the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module packed with supplies and spare parts to the station. Atlantis is targeted to launch June 28, and will be the last shuttle flight for the Space Shuttle Program. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2835

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians garbed in protective wear, commonly known as 'bunny suits,' check the installation of cargo inside the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module for shuttle Atlantis' flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis and its payload is being prepared for the STS-135 mission, which will deliver the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module packed with supplies and spare parts to the station. Atlantis is targeted to launch June 28, and will be the last shuttle flight for the Space Shuttle Program. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2925

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians garbed in protective wear, commonly known as 'bunny suits,' install cargo inside the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module for shuttle Atlantis' flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis and its payload is being prepared for the STS-135 mission, which will deliver the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module packed with supplies and spare parts to the station. Atlantis is targeted to launch June 28, and will be the last shuttle flight for the Space Shuttle Program. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2923

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians monitor the progress of cargo as it is being prepared for installation inside the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module for shuttle Atlantis' flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis and its payload is being prepared for the STS-135 mission, which will deliver the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module packed with supplies and spare parts to the station. Atlantis is targeted to launch June 28, and will be the last shuttle flight for the Space Shuttle Program. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2905

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians monitor the progress of cargo as it is being prepared for installation inside the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module for shuttle Atlantis' flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis and its payload is being prepared for the STS-135 mission, which will deliver the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module packed with supplies and spare parts to the station. Atlantis is targeted to launch June 28, and will be the last shuttle flight for the Space Shuttle Program. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2904

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians monitor the progress of cargo as it is being prepared for installation inside the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module for shuttle Atlantis' flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis and its payload is being prepared for the STS-135 mission, which will deliver the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module packed with supplies and spare parts to the station. Atlantis is targeted to launch June 28, and will be the last shuttle flight for the Space Shuttle Program. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2906

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians are preparing to install cargo for installation inside the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module for shuttle Atlantis' flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis and its payload is being prepared for the STS-135 mission, which will deliver the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module packed with supplies and spare parts to the station. Atlantis is targeted to launch June 28, and will be the last shuttle flight for the Space Shuttle Program. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2907

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a technician prepares the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module for cargo that will be installed inside it for shuttle Atlantis' flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis and its payload is being prepared for the STS-135 mission, which will deliver the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module packed with supplies and spare parts to the station. Atlantis is targeted to launch June 28, and will be the last shuttle flight for the Space Shuttle Program. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2908

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians install cargo inside the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module for shuttle Atlantis' flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis and its payload is being prepared for the STS-135 mission, which will deliver the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module packed with supplies and spare parts to the station. Atlantis is targeted to launch June 28, and will be the last shuttle flight for the Space Shuttle Program. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2910

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, cargo is being prepared for installation inside the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module for shuttle Atlantis' flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis and its payload is being prepared for the STS-135 mission, which will deliver the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module packed with supplies and spare parts to the station. Atlantis is targeted to launch June 28, and will be the last shuttle flight for the Space Shuttle Program. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2903

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians garbed in protective wear, commonly known as 'bunny suits,' and a worker checks the cargo that will be installed inside the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module for shuttle Atlantis' flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis and its payload is being prepared for the STS-135 mission, which will deliver the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module packed with supplies and spare parts to the station. Atlantis is targeted to launch June 28, and will be the last shuttle flight for the Space Shuttle Program. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2926

In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a technician garbed in protective wear, commonly known as a 'bunny suit,' secures the cargo that will be installed inside the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module for shuttle Atlantis' flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis and its payload is being prepared for the STS-135 mission, which will deliver the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module packed with supplies and spare parts to the station. Atlantis is targeted to launch June 28, and will be the last shuttle flight for the Space Shuttle Program. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2929

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, cargo is secured and ready to be installed inside the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module for shuttle Atlantis' flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis and its payload is being prepared for the STS-135 mission, which will deliver the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module packed with supplies and spare parts to the station. Atlantis is targeted to launch June 28, and will be the last shuttle flight for the Space Shuttle Program. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2930

In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, technicians garbed in protective wear, commonly known as 'bunny suits,' secure the cargo that will be installed inside the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module for shuttle Atlantis' flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis and its payload is being prepared for the STS-135 mission, which will deliver the Raffaello multi-purpose logistics module packed with supplies and spare parts to the station. Atlantis is targeted to launch June 28, and will be the last shuttle flight for the Space Shuttle Program. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-2928

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Media representatives participate in a Now and Future Tour at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Here, they make a stop at the Shuttle Landing Facility's midfield to learn about the potential for private companies and government agencies to use the runway for a diversity of launch systems, including orbital and suborbital flights. Other stops along the tour included Launch Pad 39B and Orbiter Processing Facility-2 (OPF-2). Pad B is being restructured for future use. Its new design will feature a "clean pad" for rockets to come with their own launcher, making it more versatile for a number of vehicles. OPF-2 is where shuttle Discovery is being prepared for future public display at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-3142

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Press Site bull pen at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, The LEGO Group's Daire McCabe and NASA's Associate Administrator for Education Leland Melvin talk about the LEGO sets going up to the International Space Station aboard space shuttle Endeavour's STS-134 mission. NASA and The LEGO Group will send 23 LEGO sets to the station and some of those sets include a space shuttle, an ISS model, a Global Positioning Satellite and NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. The sets will be used for NASA's Teaching From Space Project, which is part of a three-year Space Act Agreement with the toy maker to spark the interest of children in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Liftoff is scheduled for April 29 at 3:47 p.m. EDT. This will be the final spaceflight for Endeavour. For more information visit, www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-3140

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Media representatives participate in a Now and Future Tour at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Here, they make a stop at the Shuttle Landing Facility's midfield to learn about the potential for private companies and government agencies to use the runway for a diversity of launch systems, including orbital and suborbital flights. Other stops along the tour included Launch Pad 39B and Orbiter Processing Facility-2 (OPF-2). Pad B is being restructured for future use. Its new design will feature a "clean pad" for rockets to come with their own launcher, making it more versatile for a number of vehicles. OPF-2 is where shuttle Discovery is being prepared for future public display at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-3144

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Press Site bull pen at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, The LEGO Group's Daire McCabe and NASA's Associate Administrator for Education Leland Melvin talk about the LEGO sets going up to the International Space Station aboard space shuttle Endeavour's STS-134 mission. NASA and The LEGO Group will send 23 LEGO sets to the station and some of those sets include a space shuttle, an ISS model, a Global Positioning Satellite and NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. The sets will be used for NASA's Teaching From Space Project, which is part of a three-year Space Act Agreement with the toy maker to spark the interest of children in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Liftoff is scheduled for April 29 at 3:47 p.m. EDT. This will be the final spaceflight for Endeavour. For more information visit, www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-3141

TITUSVILLE, Fla. -- Lockheed Martin technicians in the Astrotech payload processing facility in Titusville, Fla., deploy and test the Radio and Plasma Wave Sensor, called WAVES for short, on to NASA's Juno spacecraft. WAVES is a science boom instrument that will measure radio and plasma waves emitting from Jupiter. Juno is scheduled to launch aboard an Atlas V rocket from Cape Canaveral, Fla., on Aug. 5, 2011, reaching Jupiter in July 2016. Juno is scheduled to launch aboard an Atlas V rocket from Cape Canaveral, Fla., on Aug. 5, 2011, reaching Jupiter in July 2016. The spacecraft will orbit the giant planet more than 30 times, skimming to within 3,000 miles above its cloud tops, for about one year. With its suite of science instruments, the spacecraft will investigate the existence of a solid planetary core, map Jupiter's intense magnetic field, measure the amount of water and ammonia in the deep atmosphere, and observe the planet's auroras. For more information visit, www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/juno. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-3269

TITUSVILLE, Fla. -- In the Astrotech payload processing facility in Titusville, Fla., the Radio and Plasma Wave Sensor, called WAVES for short, will be installed, deployed and tested on to NASA's Juno spacecraft. WAVES is a science boom instrument that will measure radio and plasma waves emitting from Jupiter. Juno is scheduled to launch aboard an Atlas V rocket from Cape Canaveral, Fla., on Aug. 5, 2011, reaching Jupiter in July 2016. The spacecraft will orbit the giant planet more than 30 times, skimming to within 3,000 miles above its cloud tops, for about one year. With its suite of science instruments, the spacecraft will investigate the existence of a solid planetary core, map Jupiter's intense magnetic field, measure the amount of water and ammonia in the deep atmosphere, and observe the planet's auroras. For more information visit, www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/juno. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-3264

TITUSVILLE, Fla. -- Lockheed Martin technicians in the Astrotech payload processing facility in Titusville, Fla., deploy and test the Radio and Plasma Wave Sensor, called WAVES for short, on to NASA's Juno spacecraft. WAVES is a science boom instrument that will measure radio and plasma waves emitting from Jupiter. Juno is scheduled to launch aboard an Atlas V rocket from Cape Canaveral, Fla., on Aug. 5, 2011, reaching Jupiter in July 2016. Juno is scheduled to launch aboard an Atlas V rocket from Cape Canaveral, Fla., on Aug. 5, 2011, reaching Jupiter in July 2016. The spacecraft will orbit the giant planet more than 30 times, skimming to within 3,000 miles above its cloud tops, for about one year. With its suite of science instruments, the spacecraft will investigate the existence of a solid planetary core, map Jupiter's intense magnetic field, measure the amount of water and ammonia in the deep atmosphere, and observe the planet's auroras. For more information visit, www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/juno. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-3270

TITUSVILLE, Fla. -- Lockheed Martin technicians in the Astrotech payload processing facility in Titusville, Fla., prepare to install, deploy and test the Radio and Plasma Wave Sensor, called WAVES for short, on to NASA's Juno spacecraft. WAVES is a science boom instrument that will measure radio and plasma waves emitting from Jupiter. Juno is scheduled to launch aboard an Atlas V rocket from Cape Canaveral, Fla., on Aug. 5, 2011, reaching Jupiter in July 2016. The spacecraft will orbit the giant planet more than 30 times, skimming to within 3,000 miles above its cloud tops, for about one year. With its suite of science instruments, the spacecraft will investigate the existence of a solid planetary core, map Jupiter's intense magnetic field, measure the amount of water and ammonia in the deep atmosphere, and observe the planet's auroras. For more information visit, www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/juno. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-3265

Cape Canaveral, Fla. -- Students listen intently as a laboratory technician describes a project that's being researched in Kennedy’s Space Life Sciences Laboratory (SLSL). High-school students from two Orlando, Fla., schools travelled to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida to participate in National Lab Day activities. During the event, about 80 students, toured various facilities and engaged in educational hands-on activities. National Lab Day is a partnership between federal agencies, foundations, professional societies and organizations devoted to promoting science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, hands-on discovery-based laboratory experiences for students. Photo Credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-3471

Cape Canaveral, Fla. -- A research laboratory is prepared for students to perform hands-on activities in Kennedy’s Space Life Sciences Laboratory (SLSL). High-school students from two Orlando, Fla., schools travelled to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida to participate in National Lab Day activities. During the event, about 80 students, toured various facilities and engaged in educational hands-on activities. National Lab Day is a partnership between federal agencies, foundations, professional societies and organizations devoted to promoting science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, hands-on discovery-based laboratory experiences for students. Photo Credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-3470

Cape Canaveral, Fla. -- Students listen intently as a laboratory technician describes the experiment being conducted in Kennedy’s Space Life Sciences Laboratory (SLSL). High-school students from two Orlando, Fla., schools travelled to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida to participate in National Lab Day activities. During the event, about 80 students, toured various facilities and engaged in educational hands-on activities. National Lab Day is a partnership between federal agencies, foundations, professional societies and organizations devoted to promoting science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, hands-on discovery-based laboratory experiences for students. Photo Credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-3465

Cape Canaveral, Fla. -- Students participate in a hands-on activity as a laboratory technician looks on in Kennedy’s Space Life Sciences Laboratory (SLSL). High-school students from two Orlando, Fla., schools travelled to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida to participate in National Lab Day activities. During the event, about 80 students, toured various facilities and engaged in educational hands-on activities. National Lab Day is a partnership between federal agencies, foundations, professional societies and organizations devoted to promoting science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, hands-on discovery-based laboratory experiences for students. Photo Credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-3464

Cape Canaveral, Fla. -- Students participate in a high-altitude balloon experiment that's being conducted on the grounds of Kennedy’s Space Life Sciences Laboratory (SLSL). High-school students from two Orlando, Fla., schools travelled to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida to participate in National Lab Day activities. During the event, about 80 students, toured various facilities and engaged in educational hands-on activities. National Lab Day is a partnership between federal agencies, foundations, professional societies and organizations devoted to promoting science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, hands-on discovery-based laboratory experiences for students. Photo Credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-3469

Cape Canaveral, Fla. -- Students listen intently as a laboratory technician describes a project that's being researched in Kennedy’s Space Life Sciences Laboratory (SLSL). High-school students from two Orlando, Fla., schools travelled to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida to participate in National Lab Day activities. During the event, about 80 students, toured various facilities and engaged in educational hands-on activities. National Lab Day is a partnership between federal agencies, foundations, professional societies and organizations devoted to promoting science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, hands-on discovery-based laboratory experiences for students. Photo Credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-3474

Cape Canaveral, Fla. -- Students listen intently as a laboratory technician describes the high-altitude balloon experiment that's being conducted on the grounds of Kennedy’s Space Life Sciences Laboratory (SLSL). High-school students from two Orlando, Fla., schools travelled to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida to participate in National Lab Day activities. During the event, about 80 students, toured various facilities and engaged in educational hands-on activities. National Lab Day is a partnership between federal agencies, foundations, professional societies and organizations devoted to promoting science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, hands-on discovery-based laboratory experiences for students. Photo Credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-3466

Cape Canaveral, Fla. -- Students listen intently as a laboratory technician describes a project that's being researched in Kennedy’s Space Life Sciences Laboratory (SLSL). High-school students from two Orlando, Fla., schools travelled to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida to participate in National Lab Day activities. During the event, about 80 students, toured various facilities and engaged in educational hands-on activities. National Lab Day is a partnership between federal agencies, foundations, professional societies and organizations devoted to promoting science, technology, engineering and math, or STEM, hands-on discovery-based laboratory experiences for students. Photo Credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-3472

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the rotating service structure (RSS) is moved away from space shuttle Endeavour in preparation for the shuttle's upcoming launch. Retraction of the structure, which provides weather protection and access to the shuttle, began at 11:44 a.m. EDT and was completed at 12:24 p.m. RSS "rollback" is a significant milestone in Endeavour's STS-134 mission countdown. Liftoff is scheduled for May 16 at 8:56 a.m. EDT. Endeavour and its crew will deliver the Express Logistics Carrier-3, Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2 (AMS), a high-pressure gas tank and additional spare parts for the Dextre robotic helper to the station. This will be the final spaceflight for Endeavour. For more information visit, www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-3519

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the rotating service structure (RSS) is moved away from space shuttle Endeavour in preparation for the shuttle's upcoming launch. Retraction of the structure, which provides weather protection and access to the shuttle, began at 11:44 a.m. EDT and was completed at 12:24 p.m. RSS "rollback" is a significant milestone in Endeavour's STS-134 mission countdown. Liftoff is scheduled for May 16 at 8:56 a.m. EDT. Endeavour and its crew will deliver the Express Logistics Carrier-3, Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2 (AMS), a high-pressure gas tank and additional spare parts for the Dextre robotic helper to the station. This will be the final spaceflight for Endeavour. For more information visit, www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-3517

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the rotating service structure (RSS) is moved away from space shuttle Endeavour in preparation for the shuttle's upcoming launch. Retraction of the structure, which provides weather protection and access to the shuttle, began at 11:44 a.m. EDT and was completed at 12:24 p.m. RSS "rollback" is a significant milestone in Endeavour's STS-134 mission countdown. Liftoff is scheduled for May 16 at 8:56 a.m. EDT. Endeavour and its crew will deliver the Express Logistics Carrier-3, Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2 (AMS), a high-pressure gas tank and additional spare parts for the Dextre robotic helper to the station. This will be the final spaceflight for Endeavour. For more information visit, www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-3516

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the rotating service structure (RSS) is moved away from space shuttle Endeavour in preparation for the shuttle's upcoming launch. Retraction of the structure, which provides weather protection and access to the shuttle, began at 11:44 a.m. EDT and was completed at 12:24 p.m. RSS "rollback" is a significant milestone in Endeavour's STS-134 mission countdown. Liftoff is scheduled for May 16 at 8:56 a.m. EDT. Endeavour and its crew will deliver the Express Logistics Carrier-3, Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2 (AMS), a high-pressure gas tank and additional spare parts for the Dextre robotic helper to the station. This will be the final spaceflight for Endeavour. For more information visit, www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-3518

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Members of the media and Kennedy workers snap photos of shuttle Atlantis as it makes its final planned move from Orbiter Processing Facility-1 to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The move called "rollover" is a major milestone in processing for the STS-135 mission to the International Space Station. Inside the VAB, the shuttle will be attached to its external fuel tank and solid rocket boosters. Commander Chris Ferguson, Pilot Doug Hurley and Mission Specialists Sandra Magnus and Rex Walheim are targeted to launch in early July, taking with them the Raffaello multipurpose logistics module packed with supplies, logistics and spare parts. The STS-135 mission also will fly a system to investigate the potential for robotically refueling existing spacecraft and return a failed ammonia pump module to help NASA better understand the failure mechanism and improve pump designs for future systems. STS-135 will be the 33rd flight of Atlantis, the 37th shuttle mission to the space station, and the 135th and final mission of NASA's Space Shuttle Program. For more information visit, www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-3658

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Shuttle Atlantis is prepared for its final planned move from Orbiter Processing Facility-1 to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The move called "rollover" is a major milestone in processing for the STS-135 mission to the International Space Station. Inside the VAB, the shuttle will be attached to its external fuel tank and solid rocket boosters. Commander Chris Ferguson, Pilot Doug Hurley and Mission Specialists Sandra Magnus and Rex Walheim are targeted to launch in early July, taking with them the Raffaello multipurpose logistics module packed with supplies, logistics and spare parts. The STS-135 mission also will fly a system to investigate the potential for robotically refueling existing spacecraft and return a failed ammonia pump module to help NASA better understand the failure mechanism and improve pump designs for future systems. STS-135 will be the 33rd flight of Atlantis, the 37th shuttle mission to the space station, and the 135th and final mission of NASA's Space Shuttle Program. For more information visit, www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-3653

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Technicians prepare shuttle Atlantis for its final planned move from Orbiter Processing Facility-1 to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The move called "rollover" is a major milestone in processing for the STS-135 mission to the International Space Station. Inside the VAB, the shuttle will be attached to its external fuel tank and solid rocket boosters. Commander Chris Ferguson, Pilot Doug Hurley and Mission Specialists Sandra Magnus and Rex Walheim are targeted to launch in early July, taking with them the Raffaello multipurpose logistics module packed with supplies, logistics and spare parts. The STS-135 mission also will fly a system to investigate the potential for robotically refueling existing spacecraft and return a failed ammonia pump module to help NASA better understand the failure mechanism and improve pump designs for future systems. STS-135 will be the 33rd flight of Atlantis, the 37th shuttle mission to the space station, and the 135th and final mission of NASA's Space Shuttle Program. For more information visit, www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-3652

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- STS-135 Commander Chris Ferguson, Mission Specialists Sandra Magnus and Rex Walheim, and Pilot Doug Hurley pause for a photo while watching Atlantis' rollover from Orbiter Processing Facility-1 to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The move called "rollover" is a major milestone in processing for the STS-135 mission to the International Space Station. Inside the VAB, the shuttle will be attached to its external fuel tank and solid rocket boosters. Commander Chris Ferguson, Pilot Doug Hurley and Mission Specialists Sandra Magnus and Rex Walheim are targeted to launch in early July, taking with them the Raffaello multipurpose logistics module packed with supplies, logistics and spare parts. The STS-135 mission also will fly a system to investigate the potential for robotically refueling existing spacecraft and return a failed ammonia pump module to help NASA better understand the failure mechanism and improve pump designs for future systems. STS-135 will be the 33rd flight of Atlantis, the 37th shuttle mission to the space station, and the 135th and final mission of NASA's Space Shuttle Program. For more information visit, www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-3659

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Members of the media and Kennedy workers watch as shuttle Atlantis makes its final planned move into the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) from Orbiter Processing Facility-1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The move called "rollover" is a major milestone in processing for the STS-135 mission to the International Space Station. Commander Chris Ferguson, Pilot Doug Hurley and Mission Specialists Sandra Magnus and Rex Walheim are targeted to launch in early July, taking with them the Raffaello multipurpose logistics module packed with supplies, logistics and spare parts. The STS-135 mission also will fly a system to investigate the potential for robotically refueling existing spacecraft and return a failed ammonia nfor future systems. STS-135 will be the 33rd flight of Atlantis, the 37th shuttle mission to the space station, and the 135th and final mission of NASA's Space Shuttle Program. For more information visit, www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-3681

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility-1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-135 Pilot Doug Hurley is on hand to watch Atlantis' rollover from Orbiter Processing Facility-1 to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The move called "rollover" is a major milestone in processing for the STS-135 mission to the International Space Station. Inside the VAB, the shuttle will be attached to its external fuel tank and solid rocket boosters. Commander Chris Ferguson, Pilot Doug Hurley and Mission Specialists Sandra Magnus and Rex Walheim are targeted to launch in early July, taking with them the Raffaello multipurpose logistics module packed with supplies, logistics and spare parts. The STS-135 mission also will fly a system to investigate the potential for robotically refueling existing spacecraft and return a failed ammonia pump module to help NASA better understand the failure mechanism and improve pump designs for future systems. STS-135 will be the 33rd flight of Atlantis, the 37th shuttle mission to the space station, and the 135th and final mission of NASA's Space Shuttle Program. For more information visit, www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-3654

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Shuttle Atlantis' three main engines take center stage in this image as Atlantis is being moved to the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) from Orbiter Processing Faciity-1 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The move called "rollover" is a major milestone in processing for the STS-135 mission to the International Space Station. Inside the VAB, the shuttle will be attached to its external fuel tank and solid rocket boosters. Commander Chris Ferguson, Pilot Doug Hurley and Mission Specialists Sandra Magnus and Rex Walheim are targeted to launch in early July, taking with them the Raffaello multipurpose logistics module packed with supplies, logistics and spare parts. The STS-135 mission also will fly a system to investigate the potential for robotically refueling existing spacecraft and return a failed ammonia pump module to help NASA better understand the failure mechanism and improve pump designs for future systems. STS-135 will be the 33rd flight of Atlantis, the 37th shuttle mission to the space station, and the 135th and final mission of NASA's Space Shuttle Program. For more information visit, www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts135/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2011-3657