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Card Number 260, Frankie Kemble, from the Actors and Actresses series (N145-7) issued by Duke Sons & Co. to promote Duke Cigarettes

Card Number 124, Frankie Kemble, from the Actors and Actresses series (N145-2) issued by Duke Sons & Co. to promote Cross Cut Cigarettes

Card Number 36, Frankie Kemble, from the Actors and Actresses series (N145-6) issued by Duke Sons & Co. to promote Duke Cigarettes

Card Number 50, Frankie Kimble, from the Actors and Actresses series (N145-4) issued by Duke Sons & Co. to promote Cameo Cigarettes

Frankie Raymond, from the Actors and Actresses series (N45, Type 8) for Virginia Brights Cigarettes

Card 758, Frankie Kemble, from the Actors and Actresses series (N45, Type 2) for Virginia Brights Cigarettes

Frankie Kemble, from World's Beauties, Series 2 (N27) for Allen & Ginter Cigarettes

Alice Dacre and Frankie Raymond, from the Actors and Actresses series (N45, Type 8) for Virginia Brights Cigarettes

Frankie Raymond and Bessie Lynch, from the Actresses series (N668)

Frankie Raymond, from the Actors and Actresses series (N45, Type 8) for Virginia Brights Cigarettes

Frankie Burns

Nettie Bellamy, Bess Denning, Frankie Thompson, Lillian Shannon, Eton Blanton, Lola Solomon, Anna Dougherty, Clara McCormick, and Mamie O'Reilly- Texas Girls

[Frankie Frisch, New York NL (baseball)]

[Frankie Frisch, New York NL (baseball)]

[Frankie Frisch, New York NL (baseball)]

[Frankie Frisch, New York NL & Aaron Ward, New York AL (baseball)]

[Portrait of Bud Freeman and Frankie Laine, New York, N.Y.(?), between 1938 and 1948]

Palo Alto, California. Frankie Albert, Stanford's All-American quarterback, and two nurses. He was one of the first to make an appointment to give his blood to the Red Cross blood donor service when the mobile unit visited Palo Alto

Frankie and Johnnie

Frankie and Johnnie

Frankie and Johnnie

[Portrait of Frankie Laine, Paramount Theater, New York, N.Y., between 1946 and 1948]

[Portrait of Frankie Laine, Paramount Theater, New York, N.Y., between 1946 and 1948]

[Portrait of Frankie Laine, New York, N.Y., between 1946 and 1948]

[Portrait of Frankie Laine and Jimmy Crawford, New York, N.Y., between 1946 and 1948]

[Portrait of Frankie Laine and Jimmy Crawford, New York, N.Y., between 1946 and 1948]

[Portrait of Frankie Laine and Vic Damone, New York, N.Y., between 1946 and 1948]

[Portrait of Frankie Laine and Mitch Miller, New York, N.Y., between 1946 and 1948]

[Portrait of Frankie Laine, New York, N.Y., between 1946 and 1948]

[Portrait of Frankie Laine and Mitch Miller, New York, N.Y., between 1946 and 1948]

[Portrait of Frankie Laine and Vic Damone, New York, N.Y., between 1946 and 1948]

[Portrait of Frankie Laine, New York, N.Y., between 1946 and 1948]

[Portrait of Frankie Laine, New York, N.Y., between 1946 and 1948]

[Portrait of Frankie Laine, Paramount Theater, New York, N.Y., between 1946 and 1948]

[Portrait of Frankie Laine, New York, N.Y., between 1946 and 1948]

[Portrait of Frankie Laine, New York, N.Y., between 1946 and 1948]

First Lady Betty Ford and Fashion Designer Frankie Welch Holding a Scarf in the West Sitting Room of the White House

Photograph of First Lady Betty Ford with Designer Frankie Welch and S. Dillon Ripley at the Presentation of Her Gown to the First Ladies Collection at the Smithsonian Institution

SGM Robert F. Beach, right, command sergeant major, Forces Command (FORSCOM), talks with soldiers of the 2nd Brigade, 5th Infantry Division (Mechanized), who were participating in a field exercise during his visit to the base. Standing beside Beach is SGM Frankie L. Glover, command sergeant major, 5th Infantry Division

STAFF Sergeant (SSGT) Frankie Matthews, USAF, 51st Operations Support Squadron (OSS), in Mission-Oriented Protective Posture response level 2 (MOPP-2), talks to an outgoing aircraft during the BEVERLY BULLDOG exercise at Osan Air Base, Korea

At Spangdahlem Air Base (AB), Deutschland / Germany (DEU) Bundeswehr Soldiers receive training from US Air Force (USAF) training instructor Frankie Hau, on security operations, so they can help provide base security

During the post and relief ceremony, Sergeant Major (SGTMAJ) Frankie Holmes, USMC, oncoming Marine Aircraft Group-36 (MAG-36) Sergeant Major, thanks the outgoing MAG-36 Sergeant Major, and his wife for their hospitality. He also speaks to those in attendance to tell a little about himself and his thoughts on getting the opportunity to take on the new job. Behind him stand Marines of MAG-36 in formation in front of a KC-130 Hercules at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Futenma, Okinawa, Japan

Sergeant Major (SGTMAJ) Roberto Orosco, USMC, (right), stands at ease with SGTMAJ Frankie Holmes, USMC, as they listen to the Marine Aircraft Group-36 (MAG-36) commander thank SGTMAJ Orosco for his service at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Futenma, Okinawa, Japan. MAG-36 held the post and relief ceremony for the departing SGTMAJ Orosco and his relief, the oncoming SGTMAJ Holmes. In the background sits a CH-53 Super Stallion

With a KC-130 Hercules as a backdrop, members of the Marine Aircraft Group-36 (MAG-36) stand in formation as they listen to Sergeant Major (SGTMAJ) Frankie Holmes, USMC, (left), oncoming MAG-36 Sergeant Major, thanks the outgoing Sergeant Major and his family for their hospitality and tell a little about himself. The post and relief ceremony took place at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Futenma, Okinawa, Japan

Marines of Marine Air Group-36 (MAG-36) stand at present arms during a post and relief ceremony for the departing Sergeant Major (SGTMAG) Roberto Orosco, USMC, and his relief, the oncoming SGTMAJ Frankie Holmes, USMC, at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Futenma, Okinawa, Japan. In the background sits a CH-46 Sea Stallion Helicopter

At the Marine Aircraft Group-36 (MAG-36) post and relief ceremony, Colonel (COL) Gordon O'Neill, USMC, (right), Commanding Officer, MAG-36, speaks to those in attendance, giving some background on Sergeant Major (SGTMAJ) Frankie Holmes, USMC, (center), the oncoming MAG-36 Sergeant Major, before introducing him. Outgoing SGTMAJ Roberto Orosco, USMC, stands to the left. Behind them sits a CH-53 Super Stallion and a KC-130 Hercules

With a KC-130 Hercules as a backdrop, Sergeant Major (SGTMAJ) Roberto Orosco, USMC, (left), SGTMAJ Frankie Holmes, USMC, (center) and Colonel (COL) Gordon O'Neill, USMC, Commanding Officer, Marine Aircraft Group-36 (MAG-36), look on as the formation prepares for the pass in review. The review is part of the MAG-36 post and relief ceremony for the departing SGTMAJ Orosco and his relief, the oncoming SGTMAJ Holmes at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Futenma, Okinawa, Japan

With a KC-130 Hercules as a backdrop, Sergeant Major (SGTMAJ) Frankie Holmes, USMC, (left), oncoming Marine Aircraft Group-36 (MAG-36) Sergeant Major, and Colonel (COL) Gordon O'Neill, Commanding Officer, MAG- 36, look on as the formation prepares for the pass in review. The review is part of the MAG-36 post and relief ceremony at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Futenma, Okinawa, Japan

Sergeant Major (SGTMAJ) Roberto Orosco, USMC, (left), holding the Non Commissioned Officer Sword, and SGTMAJ Frankie Holmes, USMC, (center), stand before Colonel Gordon O'Neill, USMC, Commanding Officer, Marine Aircraft Group-36 (MAG-36), as they take part in the traditional passing of the NCO Sword. The event took place as part of the MAG-36 post and relief ceremony for the departing SGTMAJ Orosco and his relief, the oncoming SGTMAJ Holmes, at Marine Corps Air Station MCAS) Futenma, Okinawa, Japan

Colonel (COL) Gordon O'Neill, USMC, (left), Commanding Officer, Marine Air Group-36 (MAG-36) and Sergeant Major (SGTMAJ) Frankie Holmes, USMC, oncoming MAG-36 Sergeant Major render a salute during a post and relief ceremony at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Futenma, Okinawa, Japan

Sergeant Major (SGTMAJ) Frankie Holmes, USMC, (left), oncoming Marine Aircraft Group-36 (MAG-36) Sergeant Major, and Colonel (COL) Gordon O'Neill, USMC, Commanding Officer, MAG-36, look on as the III Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF) Marching Band performs one last time. This was the end of the MAG-36 post and relief ceremony for the departing SGTMAJ Orosco and his relief, the oncoming SGTMAJ Holmes at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Futenma, Okinawa, Japan

With a KC-130 Hercules as a backdrop, members of the Marine Aircraft Group-36 (MAG-36) stand in formation as they listen to Sergeant Major (SGTMAJ) Frankie Holmes, USMC, (left), oncoming MAG-36 Sergeant Major, standing next to Colonel (COL) Gordon O'Neill, USMC, Commanding Officer, MAG-36, tell a little about himself. The post and relief ceremony took place at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Futenma, Okinawa, Japan

During the post and relief ceremony, Sergeant Major (SGTMAJ) Frankie Holmes, USMC, oncoming Marine Aircraft Group-36 (MAG-36) Sergeant Major, thanks the outgoing MAG-36 Sergeant Major, and his wife for their hospitality. He also speaks to those in attendance to tell a little about himself and his thoughts on getting the opportunity to take on the new job. Behind him stand Marines of MAG-36 in formation in front of a KC-130 Hercules at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Futenma, Okinawa, Japan

Sergeant Major (SGTMAJ) Roberto Orosco, USMC, (left), holds the Non Commissioned Officers Sword, standing next to SGTMAJ Frankie Holmes, as they prepare to take part in the traditional passing of the NCO Sword. The Marine Aircraft Group-36 (MAG-36) held the post and relief ceremony on the ramp at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Futenma, Okinawa, Japan, for departing SGTMAJ Roberto Orosco and his relief, the oncoming SGTMAJ Holmes

With a KC-130 Hercules as a backdrop during the post and relief ceremony, Sergeant Major (SGTMAJ) Frankie Holmes, USMC, oncoming Marine Aircraft Group-36 (MAG-36) Sergeant Major, addresses the Marines of MAG-36, standing in formation at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Futenma, Okinawa, Japan

Sergeant Major (SGTMAJ) Roberto Orosco, USMC, holding the Non Commissioned Officers Sword, and SGTMAJ Frankie Holmes, USMC, (left), stand before Colonel Gordon O'Neill, USMC, Commanding Officer, Marine Aircraft Group-36 (MAG-36), as they prepare to take part in the post and relief ceremony, the traditional passing of the NCO Sword. Unit and family members stand behind them as the ceremony begins at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Futenma, Okinawa, Japan

With a KC-130 Hercules as a backdrop during the post and relief ceremony at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Futenma, Okinawa, Japan, the Parade STAFF and Color Guard march toward Sergeant Major (SGTMAJ) Frankie Holmes, USMC, (left), oncoming Marine Aircraft Group-36 (MAG-36) Sergeant Major, and Colonel (COL) Gordon O'Neill, USMC, Commanding Officer, MAG-36

At the Marine Aircraft Group-36 (MAG-36) post and relief ceremony Sergeant Major (SGTMAJ) Frankie Holmes, USMC, (right), oncoming MAG-36 Sergeant Major, speaks to SGTMAJ Roberto Orosco, USMC, outgoing MAG-36 Sergeant Major, and thanks him and his wife for their hospitality. He also speaks to those in attendance to tell them a little about himself and his thoughts on taking on the new job. In the background are Marines of MAG-36 in formation, standing in front of a CH-53 Super Stallion, at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Futenma, Okinawa, Japan

Colonel (COL) Gordon O'Neill, USMC, (left), Commanding Officer, Marine Aircraft Group-36 (MAG-36), Sergeant Major (SGTMAJ) Frankie Holmes, USMC, (center), oncoming MAG-36 Sergeant Major, and SGTMAJ Roberto Orosco, USMC, outgoing MAG-36 Sergeant Major, taking part in the traditional passing of the NCO Sword ceremony at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Futenma, Okinawa, Japan

With a KC-130 Hercules as a backdrop, Colonel (COL) Gordon O'Neill, USMC, Commanding Officer, Marine Aircraft Group-36 (MAG-36), speaks to post and relief ceremony attendees, giving some background on Sergeant Major (SGTMAJ) Frankie Holmes, oncoming MAG-36 Sergeant Major, before introducing him. The ceremony took place at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Futenma, Okinawa, Japan

At the post and relief ceremony, the traditional passing of the NCO sword, held at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Futenma, Okinawa, Japan. Sergeant Major (SGTMAJ) Frankie Holmes, USMC, (right), takes the sword from Colonel (COL) Gordon O'Neill, USMC, Commanding Officer, Marine Aircraft Group-36 (MAG-36), as a sign of his assuming the duties and responsibilities as the new Sergeant Major

Sergeant Major (SGTMAJ) Frankie Holmes, USMC, salutes Colonel Gordon O'neill, USMC, Commanding Officer, Marine Aircraft Group-36 (MAG-36), as they take part in the traditional passing of the NCO Sword. SGTMAJ Holmes prepares to receive the sword as a sign of his assuming the duties and responsibilities as the new Sergeant Major. The MAG-36 held the post and relief ceremony at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Futenma, Okinawa, Japan

With a KC-130 Hercules as a backdrop, members of the Marine Aircraft Group-36 (MAG-36) stand in formation as they listen to Sergeant Major (SGTMAJ) Frankie Holmes, USMC, (left), oncoming MAG-36 Sergeant Major, thank the outgoing Sergeant Major and his family for their hospitality and tell a little about himself. The post and relief ceremony took place at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Futenma, Okinawa, Japan

Sergeant Major (SGTMAJ) Roberto Orosco, USMC, (right), stands at ease with SGTMAJ Frankie Holmes, USMC, as they listen to the Marine Aircraft Group-36 (MAG-36) commander thank SGTMAJ Orosco for his service at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Futenma, Okinawa, Japan. MAG-36 held the post and relief ceremony for the departing SGTMAJ Orosco and his relief, the oncoming SGTMAJ Holmes. In the background sits a CH-53 Super Stallion

With a KC-130 Hercules as a backdrop, Sergeant Major (SGTMAJ) Roberto Orosco, USMC, (left), SGTMAJ Frankie Holmes, USMC, (center) and Colonel (COL) Gordon O'Neill, USMC, Commanding Officer, Marine Aircraft Group-36 (MAG-36), look on as the III Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF) Marching Band performs one last time. This was the end of the MAG-36 post and relief ceremony for the departing SGTMAJ Orosco and his relief, the oncoming SGTMAJ Holmes at Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Futenma, Okinawa, Japan

[Hurricane Rita] Cameron, LA, 1-27-06 -- Shrimp Fisherman Frankie Mock weighs some fresh caught shrimp on his Shrimp boat after loosing his home to Hurricane Rita. MARVIN NAUMAN/FEMA photo

U.S. Navy Aviation Mechanic 1ST Class Roy R. Arce, Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron 138 (VAQ-138,"Yellowjackets"), prepares an EA-6B Prowler electronic warfare aircraft for painting in the hangar bay aboard the Nimitz Class Aircraft Carrier USS JOHN C. STENNIS (CVN 74) on Jan. 31, 2007, while the STENNIS and its Strike Group is deployed in the U.S. Navy Seventh Fleet's Area of Responsibility to promote peace, regional cooperation, and stability. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication SPECIALIST SEAMAN Frankie Colbry) (Released)

President George W. Bush Embraces Singer Frankie Valli as he was Joined on Stage by Italian Prime Minister Silvo Berlusconi

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a thermal protection system technician points to an area on space shuttle Endeavour's underside that may require tile replacement. As the final planned mission of the Space Shuttle Program, Endeavour and its crew will deliver the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, as well as critical spare components to the station on the STS-134 mission targeted for launch Feb. 26, 2011. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4325

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- A panoramic view of Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, showing the nose section of space shuttle Endeavour peaking through the scaffolding. As the final planned mission of the Space Shuttle Program, Endeavour and its crew will deliver the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, as well as critical spare components to the station on the STS-134 mission targeted for launch Feb. 26, 2011. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4328

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Signs in Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, reflect the pride and dedication workers have for space shuttle Endeavour and the Space Shuttle Program. As the final planned mission of the Space Shuttle Program, Endeavour and its crew will deliver the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, as well as critical spare components to the station on the STS-134 mission targeted for launch Feb. 26, 2011. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4327

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In Orbiter Processing Facility-2 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, thermal protection system technicians work on replacing some of space shuttle Endeavour's heat shield tiles. As the final planned mission of the Space Shuttle Program, Endeavour and its crew will deliver the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, as well as critical spare components to the station on the STS-134 mission targeted for launch Feb. 26, 2011. For more information visit, http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts134/index.html. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4326

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the dexterous humanoid astronaut helper, Robonaut 2, or R2, is prepared for its lift and installation in a launch box called SLEEPR, or Structural Launch Enclosure to Effectively Protect Robonaut. R2 will fly to the International Space Station aboard space shuttle Discovery on the STS-133 mission. Although it will initially only participate in operational tests, upgrades could eventually allow the robot to realize its true purpose -- helping spacewalking astronauts with tasks outside the space station. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4390

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the dexterous humanoid astronaut helper, Robonaut 2, or R2, is lifted for its installation in a launch box called SLEEPR, or Structural Launch Enclosure to Effectively Protect Robonaut. R2 will fly to the International Space Station aboard space shuttle Discovery on the STS-133 mission. Although it will initially only participate in operational tests, upgrades could eventually allow the robot to realize its true purpose -- helping spacewalking astronauts with tasks outside the space station. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4392

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the dexterous humanoid astronaut helper, Robonaut 2, or R2, is lowered to a base plate, which is part of its launch box called SLEEPR, or Structural Launch Enclosure to Effectively Protect Robonaut. R2 will fly to the International Space Station aboard space shuttle Discovery on the STS-133 mission. Although it will initially only participate in operational tests, upgrades could eventually allow the robot to realize its true purpose -- helping spacewalking astronauts with tasks outside the space station. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4393

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the dexterous humanoid astronaut helper, Robonaut 2, or R2, is secured to a base plate, which is part of its launch box called SLEEPR, or Structural Launch Enclosure to Effectively Protect Robonaut. R2 will fly to the International Space Station aboard space shuttle Discovery on the STS-133 mission. Although it will initially only participate in operational tests, upgrades could eventually allow the robot to realize its true purpose -- helping spacewalking astronauts with tasks outside the space station. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4394

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the dexterous humanoid astronaut helper, Robonaut 2, or R2, is prepared for its lift and installation in a launch box called SLEEPR, or Structural Launch Enclosure to Effectively Protect Robonaut. R2 will fly to the International Space Station aboard space shuttle Discovery on the STS-133 mission. Although it will initially only participate in operational tests, upgrades could eventually allow the robot to realize its true purpose -- helping spacewalking astronauts with tasks outside the space station. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4391

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- As NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Launch Pad 39A is seen from the Saturn Causeway. On launch day, space shuttle astronauts ride to their launch pad and spacecraft in NASA's silver Astrovan. Along the way, they pass the Vehicle Assembly Building, Launch Control Center and Press Site. Adjacent to the road is the crawlerway, which is the route shuttles take to Kennedy's Launch Complex 39 launch pads on top of a crawler-transporter. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4396

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Pegasus barge, left, the Vehicle Assembly Building, center, and patrol boats, right, are seen from the Launch Complex 39 area. The barge carries space shuttle external fuel tanks from NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility in Louisiana to Kennedy and is towed by NASA's two solid rocket booster retrieval ships, Liberty Star and Freedom Star. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4395

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Technicians in the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida prepare to lift and load the dexterous humanoid astronaut helper, Robonaut 2, or R2, into the Permanent Multipurpose Module, or PMM. Packed inside a launch box called SLEEPR, or Structural Launch Enclosure to Effectively Protect Robonaut, R2 will be placed in the in the same launch orientation as space shuttle Discovery's STS-133 crew members -- facing toward the nose of the shuttle with the back taking all the weight. Although R2 will initially only participate in operational tests, upgrades could eventually allow the robot to realize its true purpose -- helping spacewalking astronauts with tasks outside the International Space Station. STS-133 is targeted to launch Nov. 1. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4441

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Technicians in the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida load the dexterous humanoid astronaut helper, Robonaut 2, or R2, into the Permanent Multipurpose Module, or PMM. Packed inside a launch box called SLEEPR, or Structural Launch Enclosure to Effectively Protect Robonaut, R2 will be placed in the in the same launch orientation as space shuttle Discovery's STS-133 crew members -- facing toward the nose of the shuttle with the back taking all the weight. Although R2 will initially only participate in operational tests, upgrades could eventually allow the robot to realize its true purpose -- helping spacewalking astronauts with tasks outside the International Space Station. STS-133 is targeted to launch Nov. 1. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4447

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Technicians in the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida lift the dexterous humanoid astronaut helper, Robonaut 2, or R2, toward the Permanent Multipurpose Module, or PMM. Packed inside a launch box called SLEEPR, or Structural Launch Enclosure to Effectively Protect Robonaut, R2 will be placed in the in the same launch orientation as space shuttle Discovery's STS-133 crew members -- facing toward the nose of the shuttle with the back taking all the weight. Although R2 will initially only participate in operational tests, upgrades could eventually allow the robot to realize its true purpose -- helping spacewalking astronauts with tasks outside the International Space Station. STS-133 is targeted to launch Nov. 1. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4442

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Technicians in the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida load the dexterous humanoid astronaut helper, Robonaut 2, or R2, into the Permanent Multipurpose Module, or PMM. Packed inside a launch box called SLEEPR, or Structural Launch Enclosure to Effectively Protect Robonaut, R2 will be placed in the in the same launch orientation as space shuttle Discovery's STS-133 crew members -- facing toward the nose of the shuttle with the back taking all the weight. Although R2 will initially only participate in operational tests, upgrades could eventually allow the robot to realize its true purpose -- helping spacewalking astronauts with tasks outside the International Space Station. STS-133 is targeted to launch Nov. 1. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4446

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Technicians in the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida prepare to load the dexterous humanoid astronaut helper, Robonaut 2, or R2, into the Permanent Multipurpose Module, or PMM. Packed inside a launch box called SLEEPR, or Structural Launch Enclosure to Effectively Protect Robonaut, R2 will be placed in the in the same launch orientation as space shuttle Discovery's STS-133 crew members -- facing toward the nose of the shuttle with the back taking all the weight. Although R2 will initially only participate in operational tests, upgrades could eventually allow the robot to realize its true purpose -- helping spacewalking astronauts with tasks outside the International Space Station. STS-133 is targeted to launch Nov. 1. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4444

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Technicians in the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida prepare to load the dexterous humanoid astronaut helper, Robonaut 2, or R2, into the Permanent Multipurpose Module, or PMM. Packed inside a launch box called SLEEPR, or Structural Launch Enclosure to Effectively Protect Robonaut, R2 will be placed in the in the same launch orientation as space shuttle Discovery's STS-133 crew members -- facing toward the nose of the shuttle with the back taking all the weight. Although R2 will initially only participate in operational tests, upgrades could eventually allow the robot to realize its true purpose -- helping spacewalking astronauts with tasks outside the International Space Station. STS-133 is targeted to launch Nov. 1. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4445

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Technicians in the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida load the dexterous humanoid astronaut helper, Robonaut 2, or R2, into the Permanent Multipurpose Module, or PMM. Packed inside a launch box called SLEEPR, or Structural Launch Enclosure to Effectively Protect Robonaut, R2 will be placed in the in the same launch orientation as space shuttle Discovery's STS-133 crew members -- facing toward the nose of the shuttle with the back taking all the weight. Although R2 will initially only participate in operational tests, upgrades could eventually allow the robot to realize its true purpose -- helping spacewalking astronauts with tasks outside the International Space Station. STS-133 is targeted to launch Nov. 1. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4448

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Technicians in the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida lift the dexterous humanoid astronaut helper, Robonaut 2, or R2, toward the Permanent Multipurpose Module, or PMM. Packed inside a launch box called SLEEPR, or Structural Launch Enclosure to Effectively Protect Robonaut, R2 will be placed in the in the same launch orientation as space shuttle Discovery's STS-133 crew members -- facing toward the nose of the shuttle with the back taking all the weight. Although R2 will initially only participate in operational tests, upgrades could eventually allow the robot to realize its true purpose -- helping spacewalking astronauts with tasks outside the International Space Station. STS-133 is targeted to launch Nov. 1. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4443

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- In the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, this panoramic image consisting of two images melded together, captures the twin solid rocket boosters and the base of the external fuel tank in place on the mobile launcher platform, awaiting the arrival of space shuttle Discovery. Discovery and its STS-133 crew are targeted to launch Nov. 1 and will deliver the permanent logistics module, or PMM, packed with supplies and critical spare parts, as well as Robonaut 2, the dexterous humanoid astronaut helper, to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4449

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- This panoramic view of NASA's new mobile launcher, or ML, support structure was taken from the top deck of the space shuttle's mobile launcher platform at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. It took about two years to construct the new launcher in the Mobile Launcher Park site, north of the Vehicle Assembly Building, or VAB. The 355-foot-tall structure will support NASA's future human spaceflight program. The base of the launcher is lighter than space shuttle mobile launcher platforms so the crawler-transporter can pick up the heavier load of the tower and a taller rocket. The next step will be to add ground support equipment, such as umbilicals and access arms, for future rocket launches. For information on NASA's future plans, visit www.nasa.gov. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4457

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- This panoramic view shows NASA's new mobile launcher, or ML, support structure standing tall at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. It took about two years to construct the launcher in the Mobile Launcher Park site, north of the Vehicle Assembly Building, or VAB. The 355-foot-tall structure will support NASA's future human spaceflight program. The base of the launcher is lighter than space shuttle mobile launcher platforms so the crawler-transporter can pick up the heavier load of the tower and a taller rocket. The next step will be to add ground support equipment, such as umbilicals and access arms, for future rocket launches. For information on NASA's future plans, visit www.nasa.gov. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4456

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- This panoramic view shows NASA's new mobile launcher, or ML, support structure standing tall at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. It took about two years to construct the launcher in the Mobile Launcher Park site, north of the Vehicle Assembly Building, or VAB. The 355-foot-tall structure will support NASA's future human spaceflight program. The base of the launcher is lighter than space shuttle mobile launcher platforms so the crawler-transporter can pick up the heavier load of the tower and a taller rocket. The next step will be to add ground support equipment, such as umbilicals and access arms, for future rocket launches. For information on NASA's future plans, visit www.nasa.gov. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4455

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, media and workers watch as the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is offloaded from an Air Force C-5M aircraft on the Shuttle Landing Facility runway. One of NASA's T-38 training jets, flown by a member of the STS-134 crew, is in the foreground. The state-of-the-art particle physics detector arrived from Europe and will operate as an external module on the International Space Station to study the universe and its origin by searching for dark matter. AMS will fly to the station aboard space shuttle Endeavour's STS-134 mission targeted to launch Feb. 26, 2011. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4541

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a tractor-trailer carrying the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, or AMS, is on its way to the Space Station Processing Facility, where it will be processed for launch. AMS arrived on Kennedy's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard an Air Force C-5M aircraft from Europe. AMS, a state-of-the-art particle physics detector, is designed to operate as an external module on the International Space Station. It will use the unique environment of space to study the universe and its origin by searching for dark matter. The STS-134 crew will fly AMS to the International Space Station aboard space shuttle Endeavour, targeted to launch Feb. 26, 2011. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4494

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, media and workers watch as the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is offloaded from an Air Force C-5M aircraft on the Shuttle Landing Facility runway. The state-of-the-art particle physics detector arrived at Kennedy from Europe and will operate as an external module on the International Space Station to study the universe and its origin by searching for dark matter. AMS will fly to the station aboard space shuttle Endeavour's STS-134 mission targeted to launch Feb. 26, 2011. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4540

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, three of NASA's T-38 training jets sit on the parking apron of the Shuttle Landing Facility. The STS-134 crew members flew the jets to Kennedy to watch the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) arrive aboard an Air Force C-5M aircraft from Europe. The state-of-the-art particle physics detector will operate as an external module on the International Space Station to study the universe and its origin by searching for dark matter. AMS will fly to the station aboard space shuttle Endeavour's STS-134 mission targeted to launch Feb. 26, 2011. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4538

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a tractor-trailer carrying the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, or AMS, passes the Vehicle Assembly Building en route to the Space Station Processing Facility. The state-of-the-art particle physics detector arrived on Kennedy's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard an Air Force C-5M aircraft from Europe. It will operate as an external module on the International Space Station to study the universe and its origin by searching for dark matter. AMS will fly to the station aboard space shuttle Endeavour's STS-134 mission targeted to launch Feb. 26, 2011. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4495

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, workers offload the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) from an Air Force C-5M aircraft on the Shuttle Landing Facility runway. The state-of-the-art particle physics detector arrived at Kennedy from Europe and will operate as an external module on the International Space Station to study the universe and its origin by searching for dark matter. AMS will fly to the station aboard space shuttle Endeavour's STS-134 mission targeted to launch Feb. 26, 2011. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4542

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a tractor-trailer carrying the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, or AMS, at the Space Station Processing Facility, where it will be processed for launch. AMS arrived on Kennedy's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard an Air Force C-5M aircraft from Europe. AMS, a state-of-the-art particle physics detector, is designed to operate as an external module on the International Space Station. It will use the unique environment of space to study the universe and its origin by searching for dark matter. The STS-134 crew will fly AMS to the International Space Station aboard space shuttle Endeavour, targeted to launch Feb. 26, 2011. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4496

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a tractor-trailer carrying the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, or AMS, arrives at the Space Station Processing Facility, where it will be processed for launch. The state-of-the-art particle physics detector arrived on Kennedy's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard an Air Force C-5M aircraft from Europe. It will operate as an external module on the International Space Station to study the universe and its origin by searching for dark matter. AMS will fly to the station aboard space shuttle Endeavour's STS-134 mission targeted to launch Feb. 26, 2011. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4497

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, media and workers watch as the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is offloaded from an Air Force C-5M aircraft on the Shuttle Landing Facility runway. The state-of-the-art particle physics detector arrived at Kennedy from Europe and will operate as an external module on the International Space Station to study the universe and its origin by searching for dark matter. AMS will fly to the station aboard space shuttle Endeavour's STS-134 mission targeted to launch Feb. 26, 2011. Photo credit: NASA/Frankie Martin KSC-2010-4539