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STS113-714-020 - STS-113 - Lopez-Alegria tests a foot restraint on CETA cart 2 during STS-113 EVA OPS

STS113-714-022 - STS-113 - Lopez-Alegria tests a foot restraint on CETA cart 2 during STS-113 EVA OPS

STS113-714-021 - STS-113 - Lopez-Alegria tests a foot restraint on CETA cart 2 during STS-113 EVA OPS

41B-44-2736 - STS-41B - Bruce McCandless retrieves a loose foot restraint during EVA

41B-44-2732 - STS-41B - Bruce McCandless retrieves a loose foot restraint during EVA

41B-44-2738 - STS-41B - Bruce McCandless retrieves a loose foot restraint during EVA

41B-44-2751 - STS-41B - Bruce McCandless retrieves a loose foot restraint during EVA

41B-44-2733 - STS-41B - Bruce McCandless retrieves a loose foot restraint during EVA

41B-44-2750 - STS-41B - Bruce McCandless retrieves a loose foot restraint during EVA

41B-44-2749 - STS-41B - Bruce McCandless retrieves a loose foot restraint during EVA

41B-44-2739 - STS-41B - Bruce McCandless retrieves a loose foot restraint during EVA

41B-44-2737 - STS-41B - Bruce McCandless retrieves a loose foot restraint during EVA

41B-44-2734 - STS-41B - Bruce McCandless retrieves a loose foot restraint during EVA

41B-44-2735 - STS-41B - Bruce McCandless retrieves a loose foot restraint during EVA

Astronaut Bruce McCandless II conducts an extravehicular activity (EVA) during Flight 41-B of the space shuttle Challenger. McCandless's boots are attached to a mobile foot restraint (MFR), which is attached to the end of the remote manipulator system (RMS) arm. The RMS is a cherry picker device used for maneuvering around outside the spacecraft

Astronaut Bruce McCandless II conducts an extravehicular activity (EVA) during Flight 41-B of the space shuttle Challenger. McCandless's boots are attached to a mobile foot restraint (MFR), which is attached to the end of the remote manipulator system (RMS) arm. The RMS is a cherry picker device used for maneuvering around outside the spacecraft

Astronaut Bruce McCandless II conducts an extravehicular activity (EVA) during Flight 41-B of the space shuttle Challenger. McCandless's boots are attached to a mobile foot restraint (MRF), which is attached to the end of the remote manipulator system (RMS) arm. The RMS is a cherry picker device used for manuvering outside the spacecraft

View of foot restraint strayed from Challenger

View of foot restraint strayed from Discovery

Astronaut William Fisher anchored to foot restraint on Discovery

STS058-23-024 - STS-058 - Crewmember affixing an adhesive foot restraint to the middeck floor.

STS061-87-082 - STS-061 - View of a foot restraint on the RMS arm in front of the HST solar arrays

STS058-23-026 - STS-058 - Crewmember affixing an adhesive foot restraint to the middeck floor.

STS061-87-087 - STS-061 - Foot restraint mounted on the RMS arm in front of the HST

STS061-87-079 - STS-061 - View of a foot restraint on the RMS arm in front of the HST solar arrays

STS058-23-023 - STS-058 - Crewmember affixing an adhesive foot restraint to the middeck floor.

STS058-23-028 - STS-058 - Crewmember affixing an adhesive foot restraint to the middeck floor.

STS058-23-022 - STS-058 - Crewmember affixing an adhesive foot restraint to the middeck floor.

STS058-23-027 - STS-058 - Crewmember affixing an adhesive foot restraint to the middeck floor.

STS061-87-078 - STS-061 - View of a foot restraint on the RMS arm in front of the HST solar arrays

STS058-23-030 - STS-058 - View of foot restraint on the middeck floor.

STS061-87-080 - STS-061 - View of a foot restraint on the RMS arm in front of the HST solar arrays

STS061-87-088 - STS-061 - Foot restraint mounted on the RMS arm in front of the HST

STS058-23-021 - STS-058 - Crewmember affixing an adhesive foot restraint to the middeck floor.

STS061-87-081 - STS-061 - View of a foot restraint on the RMS arm in front of the HST solar arrays

STS058-23-029 - STS-058 - View of foot restraint on the middeck floor.

STS058-23-025 - STS-058 - Crewmember affixing an adhesive foot restraint to the middeck floor.

Astronaut Carl Walz test portable foot restraint in aft cargo bay

STS088-319-035 - STS-088 - Newman with portable foot restraint during EVA 3

STS088-319-033 - STS-088 - Newman with portable foot restraint during EVA 3

STS088-319-034 - STS-088 - Newman with portable foot restraint during EVA 3

Gernhardt on Robot Arm

STS088-319-032 - STS-088 - Newman with portable foot restraint during EVA 3

Astronaut James S. Voss stands on foot restraint attached to RMS

STS075-302-030 - STS-075 - View of CO2 Absorber and foot restraint on middeck

STS065-41-023 - STS-065 - Close-up view of foot restraint in the Spacelab module

STS-91 crew members participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test, or CEIT, in KSC's Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 2. Here, Mission Specialist Janet Kavandi, Ph.D., inspects a foot restraint for an external vehicular activity (EVA) spacewalk. During CEIT, the crew have an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads and equipment with which they'll be working on-orbit. The STS-91 crew are scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Discovery for the ninth and final docking with the Russian Space Station Mir from KSC's Launch Pad 39A on May 28 at 8:05 EDT KSC-98pc469

STS-91 Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D., participates in the Crew Equipment Interface Test, or CEIT, in KSC's Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 2. He is inspecting a foot restraint for an external vehicular activity (EVA) spacewalk. During CEIT, the crew have an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads and equipment with which they'll be working on-orbit. The STS-91 crew are scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Discovery for the ninth and final docking with the Russian Space Station Mir from KSC's Launch Pad 39A on May 28 at 8:05 EDT KSC-98pc465

STS-91 crew members participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test, or CEIT, in KSC's Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 2. Here, Mission Specialist Janet Kavandi, Ph.D., inspects a foot restraint for an external vehicular activity (EVA) spacewalk. During CEIT, the crew have an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads and equipment with which they'll be working on-orbit. The STS-91 crew are scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Discovery for the ninth and final docking with the Russian Space Station Mir from KSC's Launch Pad 39A on May 28 at 8:05 EDT KSC-98pc468

STS-91 crew members participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test, or CEIT, in KSC's Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 2. Laying down inspecting a foot restraint for an extravehicular activity (EVA) spacewalk is STS-91 Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz, Ph.D. Looking over his shoulder is Kieth Johnson, an EVA trainer and flight controller from Johnson Space Center. STS-91 Mission Specialist Janet Kavandi, Ph.D., stands next to Johnson. During CEIT, the crew have an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they'll be working on-orbit. The STS-91 crew are scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Discovery for the ninth and final docking with the Russian Space Station Mir from KSC's Launch Pad 39A on May 28 at 8:05 EDT KSC-98pc466

STS-91 crew members participate in the Crew Equipment Interface Test, or CEIT, in KSC's Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 2. Here, Mission Specialist Janet Kavandi, Ph.D., inspects a foot restraint for an external vehicular activity (EVA) spacewalk. During CEIT, the crew have an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads and equipment with which they'll be working on-orbit. The STS-91 crew are scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Discovery for the ninth and final docking with the Russian Space Station Mir from KSC's Launch Pad 39A on May 28 at 8:05 EDT KSC-98pc470

STS-91 Mission Specialist Janet Kavandi, Ph.D., participates in the Crew Equipment Interface Test, or CEIT, in KSC's Orbiter Processing Facility Bay 2. She is inspecting a foot restraint for an external vehicular activity (EVA) spacewalk. During CEIT, the crew have an opportunity to get a hands-on look at the payloads with which they'll be working on-orbit. The STS-91 crew are scheduled to launch aboard the Shuttle Discovery for the ninth and final docking with the Russian Space Station Mir from KSC's Launch Pad 39A on May 28 at 8:05 EDT KSC-98pc467

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-88 Mission Specialist Nancy J. Currie works on a foot restraint attached to the Unity connecting module, part of the International Space Station, in the Space Station Processing Facility at KSC. During the mission, the Unity connecting module will be mated to the Zarya control module, which will already be in orbit. The STS-88 crew is participating in a Crew Equipment Interface Test, which gives astronauts an opportunity for a hands-on look at the payloads on which they will be working while on orbit. STS-88 will be the first Space Shuttle launch for the International Space Station. Launch is scheduled for December 1998 KSC-98pc849

In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1, STS-96 Mission Specialist Julie Payette, with the Canadian Space Agency, maneuvers a foot restraint used during space walks. The STS-96 crew is at KSC to take part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. The other crew members are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick Douglas Husband and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D.), Tamara E. Jernigan (Ph.D.), Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.), and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, who represents the Russian Space Agency. The primary payload of STS-96 is the SPACEHAB Double Module. In addition, the Space Shuttle will carry unpressurized cargo such as the external Russian cargo crane known as STRELA; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), which is a logistics items carrier; and an ORU Transfer Device (OTD), a U.S.-built crane that will be stowed on the station for use during future ISS assembly missions. These cargo items will be stowed on the International Cargo Carrier, fitted inside the payload bay behind the SPACEHAB module. STS-96 is targeted for launch on May 24 from Launch Pad 39B KSC-99pp0317

In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 1, STS-96 Mission Specialists (left) Julie Payette, with the Canadian Space Agency, and Tamara Jernigan, Ph.D., look over the foot restraint used during space walks. The STS-96 crew is at KSC to take part in a Crew Equipment Interface Test. The other crew members are Commander Kent V. Rominger, Pilot Rick Douglas Husband, and Mission Specialists Ellen Ochoa (Ph.D), Daniel Barry (M.D., Ph.D.), and Valery Ivanovich Tokarev, who represents the Russian Space Agency. The primary payload of STS-96 is the SPACEHAB Double Module. In addition, the Space Shuttle will carry unpressurized cargo such as the external Russian cargo crane known as STRELA; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), which is a logistics items carrier; and an ORU Transfer Device (OTD), a U.S.-built crane that will be stowed on the station for use during future ISS assembly missions. These cargo items will be stowed on the International Cargo Carrier, fitted inside the payload bay behind the SPACEHAB module. STS-96 is targeted for launch on May 24 from Launch Pad 39B KSC-99pp0315

During a Crew Equipment Interface Test (CEIT), members of the STS-103 crew check out a portable foot restraint on the Flight Support System that will be used on the mission, repairing the Hubble Space Telescope. The seven-member crew comprises Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Pilot Scott J. Kelly, and Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D), Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and Jean-François Clervoy of France. Nicollier and Clervoy are with the European Space Agency. Mission STS-103 is a "call-up" due to the need to replace portions of the pointing system, the gyros, which have begun to fail on the Hubble Space Telescope. Although Hubble is operating normally and conducting its scientific observations, only three of its six gyroscopes are working properly. The gyroscopes allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will not only replace gyroscopes, it will also replace a Fine Guidance Sensor and an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. The scheduled launch date in October is under review KSC-99pp1098

STS092-361-035 - STS-092 - Chiao stows a foot restraint in an EVA tool box

STS092-361-034 - STS-092 - Chiao stows a foot restraint in an EVA tool box

STS105-725-050 - STS-105 - Forrester places Barry's EMU booted feet into foot restraint on ISS P6 truss

STS105-725-044 - STS-105 - Forrester places Barry's EMU booted feet into foot restraint on ISS P6 truss

STS105-725-045 - STS-105 - Forrester places Barry's EMU booted feet into foot restraint on ISS P6 truss

STS105-725-051 - STS-105 - Forrester places Barry's EMU booted feet into foot restraint on ISS P6 truss

STS105-725-049 - STS-105 - Forrester places Barry's EMU booted feet into foot restraint on ISS P6 truss

STS105-725-043 - STS-105 - Forrester places Barry's EMU booted feet into foot restraint on ISS P6 truss

S110E5604 - STS-110 - MS Smith works with a portable foot restraint during the third EVA of STS-110

S109E5994 - STS-109 - Duct tape on foot restraint assembly hardware

S110E5606 - STS-110 - MS Smith works with a portable foot restraint during the third EVA of STS-110

S110E5605 - STS-110 - MS Smith works with a portable foot restraint during the third EVA of STS-110

S123E006742 - STS-123 - Linnehan anchored to a Canadarrm2 mobile foot restraint during Expedition 16 / STS-123 Joint Operations

S123E006751 - STS-123 - Linnehan anchored to a Canadarrm2 mobile foot restraint during Expedition 16 / STS-123 Joint Operations

S123E006743 - STS-123 - Linnehan anchored to a Canadarrm2 mobile foot restraint during Expedition 16 / STS-123 Joint Operations

Linnehan anchored to a Canadarrm2 mobile foot restraint during Expedition 16 / STS-123 Joint Operations

Linnehan anchored to a Canadarrm2 mobile foot restraint during Expedition 16 / STS-123 Joint Operations

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, crew members with the STS-125 mission get a close look at some of the equipment associated with their mission to service NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. On the lift in the foreground, Mission Specialists Mike Massimino (center left) and John Grunsfeld (right) look at the portable foot restraint on the Axial Science Instrument Protective Enclosure, or ASIPE. The STS-125 crew is taking part in a crew equipment interface test, which provides experience handling tools, equipment and hardware they will use on their mission. Space shuttle Atlantis is targeted to launch on the STS-125 mission Oct. 10. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd2556

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, crew members with the STS-125 mission get a close look at some of the equipment associated with their mission to service NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. Mission Specialists Mike Massimino (left) and John Grunsfeld look at the portable foot restraint on the Axial Science Instrument Protective Enclosure, or ASIPE. The STS-125 crew is taking part in a crew equipment interface test, which provides experience handling tools, equipment and hardware they will use on their mission. Space shuttle Atlantis is targeted to launch on the STS-125 mission Oct. 10. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd2555

ISS032-E-025098 (5 Sept. 2012) --- Anchored to a Canadarm2 mobile foot restraint, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Aki Hoshide, Expedition 32 flight engineer, participates in the mission?s third session of extravehicular activity (EVA). During the six-hour, 28-minute spacewalk, Hoshide and NASA astronaut Sunita Williams (out of frame), flight engineer, completed the installation of a Main Bus Switching Unit (MBSU) that was hampered last week by a possible misalignment and damaged threads where a bolt must be placed. They also installed a camera on the International Space Station?s robotic arm, Canadarm2. iss032e025098