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U.S. Reports: First Moon v. White Tail, 270 U.S. 243 (1926)

Apollo 11 - Saturn Apollo Program

Space Shuttle Main Engine Test Firing

This image is the first full picture showing both asteroid 243 Ida and its newly discovered moon to be transmitted to Earth from NASA's Galileo spacecraft--the first conclusive evidence that natural satellites of asteroids exist. Ida is the large object to the left, about 56 kilometers (35 miles long). Ida's natural satellite is the small object to the right. This portrait was taken by Galileo's charge-coupled device (CCD) camera on August 28, 1993, about 14 minutes before the spacecraft's closest approach to the asteriod, from a range of 10,870 kilometers (6,755 miles). Ida is a heavily cratered, irregularly shaped asteroid in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter-- the 243rd asteroid to be discovered since the first one was found at the beginning of the 19th century. It is a member of a group of asteroids called the Koronis family. The small satellite, which is about 1.5 kilometers (1 mile) across in this view, has yet to be given a name by astronomers. It has been provisionally designated '1993 (243) 1' by the International Astronomical Union. (The numbers denote the year the picture was taken, the asteroid number and the fact that it is the first moon of Ida to be found.) ALthough the satellite appears to be 'next' to Ida it is actually slightly in the foreground, closer to the spacecraft than Ida. Combining this image with data from Galileo's near-infrared mapping spectrometer, the science team estimates that the object is about 100 kilometers (60 miles) away from the center of Ida. This image is one of a six-frame series taken through different color filters, this one in green. The spatial resolution in this image is about 100 meters (330 feet) per pixel. The Galileo spacecraft flew past Ida en route to its final destination, Jupiter, where it will go into orbit in December 1995. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the galileo Project for NASA's Office of Space Science. (JPL ref. No. P-43731) ARC-1994-A91-2018

This image is the first full picture showing both asteroid 243 Ida and its newly discovered moon to be transmitted to Earth from NASA's Galileo spacecraft--the first conclusive evidence that natural satellites of asteroids exist.  Ida is the large object to the left, about 56 kilometers (35 miles long).  Ida's natural satellite is the small object to the right.  This portrait was taken by Galileo's charge-coupled device (CCD) camera on August 28, 1993, about 14 minutes before the spacecraft's closest approach to the asteriod, from a range of 10,870 kilometers (6,755 miles).  Ida is a heavily cratered, irregularly shaped asteroid in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter-- the 243rd asteroid to be discovered since the first one was found at the beginning of the 19th century.  It is a member of a group of asteroids called the Koronis family.  The small satellite, which is about 1.5 kilometers (1 mile) across in this view, has yet to be given a name by astronomers.  It has been provisionally designated '1993 (243) 1' by the International Astronomical Union.  (The numbers denote the year the picture was taken, the asteroid number and the fact that it is the first moon of Ida to be found.)  ALthough the satellite appears to be 'next' to Ida it is actually slightly in the foreground, closer to the spacecraft than Ida.  Combining this image with data from Galileo's near-infrared mapping spectrometer, the science team estimates that the object is about 100 kilometers (60 miles) away from the center of Ida.  This image is one of a six-frame series taken through different color filters, this one in green.  The spatial resolution in this image is about 100 meters (330 feet) per pixel.  The Galileo spacecraft flew past Ida en route to its final destination, Jupiter, where it will go into orbit in December 1995.  The Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the galileo Project for NASA's Office of Space Science. (JPL ref. No. P-43731) ARC-1994-A91-2018
This image is the first full picture showing both asteroid 243 Ida and its newly discovered moon to be transmitted to Earth from NASA's Galileo spacecraft--the first conclusive evidence that natural satellites of asteroids exist. Ida is the large object to the left, about 56 kilometers (35 miles long). Ida's natural satellite is the small object to the right. This portrait was taken by Galileo's charge-coupled device (CCD) camera on August 28, 1993, about 14 minutes before the spacecraft's closest approach to the asteriod, from a range of 10,870 kilometers (6,755 miles). Ida is a heavily cratered, irregularly shaped asteroid in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter-- the 243rd asteroid to be discovered since the first one was found at the beginning of the 19th century. It is a member of a group of asteroids called the Koronis family. The small satellite, which is about 1.5 kilometers (1 mile) across in this view, has yet to be given a name by astronomers. It has been provisionally designated '1993 (243) 1' by the International Astronomical Union. (The numbers denote the year the picture was taken, the asteroid number and the fact that it is the first moon of Ida to be found.) ALthough the satellite appears to be 'next' to Ida it is actually slightly in the foreground, closer to the spacecraft than Ida. Combining this image with data from Galileo's near-infrared mapping spectrometer, the science team estimates that the object is about 100 kilometers (60 miles) away from the center of Ida. This image is one of a six-frame series taken through different color filters, this one in green. The spatial resolution in this image is about 100 meters (330 feet) per pixel. The Galileo spacecraft flew past Ida en route to its final destination, Jupiter, where it will go into orbit in December 1995. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the galileo Project for NASA's Office of Space Science. (JPL ref. No. P-43731) ARC-1994-A91-2018

Asteroid Ida and Its Moon

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin addresses the audience at the Apollo 11 anniversary banquet honoring the Apollo team, the people who made the entire lunar landing program possible. The banquet was held in the Apollo/Saturn V Center, part of the KSC Visitor Complex. This is the 30th anniversary of the Apollo 11 launch and moon landing, July 16 and July 20, 1969. Among the guests at the banquet were former Apollo astronauts are Neil A. Armstrong and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin who flew on Apollo 11, the launch of the first moon landing; Gene Cernan, who flew on Apollo 10 and 17 and was the last man to walk on the moon; and Walt Cunningham, who flew on Apollo 7 KSC-99pp0874

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During an anniversary banquet honoring the Apollo team, the people who made the entire lunar landing program possible, former Apollo astronaut Neil A. Armstrong (left) shakes the hand of Judy Goldin (center), wife of NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin (right). The banquet was held in the Apollo/Saturn V Center, part of the KSC Visitor Complex. This is the 30th anniversary of the Apollo 11 launch and moon landing, July 16 and July 20, 1969. Among the guests at the banquet were former Apollo astronauts are Neil A. Armstrong and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin who flew on Apollo 11, the launch of the first moon landing; Gene Cernan, who flew on Apollo 10 and 17 and was the last man to walk on the moon; and Walt Cunningham, who flew on Apollo 7 KSC-99pp0876

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin (right) addresses the audience at the Apollo 11 anniversary banquet honoring the Apollo team, the people who made the entire lunar landing program possible. The banquet was held in the Apollo/Saturn V Center, part of the KSC Visitor Complex, with seating under an unused Saturn V rocket like those that powered the Apollo launches . This is the 30th anniversary of the Apollo 11 launch and moon landing, July 16 and July 20, 1969. Among the guests at the banquet were former Apollo astronauts are Neil A. Armstrong and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin who flew on Apollo 11, the launch of the first moon landing; Gene Cernan, who flew on Apollo 10 and 17 and was the last man to walk on the moon; and Walt Cunningham, who flew on Apollo 7 KSC-99pp0875

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During an anniversary banquet honoring the Apollo program team, the people who made the entire lunar landing program possible, former Apollo astronaut Gene Cernan relates a humorous comment while Wally Schirra (background) gestures behind him. Cernan, who flew on Apollo 10 and 17, was the last man to walk on the moon; Schirra flew on Apollo 7. The banquet was held in the Apollo/Saturn V Center, part of the KSC Visitor Complex. This is the 30th anniversary of the Apollo 11 launch and moon landing, July 16 and July 20, 1969. Other guests at the banquet were former Apollo astronauts are Neil A. Armstrong and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin who flew on Apollo 11, the launch of the first moon landing, and Walt Cunningham, who also flew on Apollo 7 KSC-99pp0877