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"Bryan" barn on rural resettlement farm unit in Irwinville Farms, Georgia. This barn, designed and built under supervision of W.P. Bryan, project manager, cost one hundred forty-five dollars. This compared with the cost of three hundred fifty dollars of Rural Resettlement Administration-specified barn

Good farm optioned by Resettlement Administration fifty miles north of Ithaca, New York.

Background photograph for Hightstown project. Play street for children. Sixth Street and Avenue C, New York City. The Solomon family who are to be resettled at Hightstown, live in this neighborhood. This Resettlement Administration project includes two hundred and fifty homes, four hundred and fourteen acres of farmland, a modern factory, utilities, including water system, recreation area and lake. Each family will have a modern home and an opportunity to work in a cooperative factory. Also a small plot of land for raising garden vegetables

Background photograph for Hightstown project. Play street for children. Sixth Street and Avenue C, New York City. The Solomon family who are to be resettled at Hightstown, live in this neighborhood. This Resettlement Administration project includes two hundred and fifty homes, four hundred and fourteen acres of farmland, a modern factory, utilities, including water system, recreation area and lake. Each family will have a modern home and an opportunity to work in a cooperative factory. Also a small plot of land for raising garden vegetables

Migrant family in Kern County. This family was sent back at the state line by Los Angeles police. Refused entrance into California, and it was only after they had wired back to Arkansas to borrow fifty dollars cash to show at the border that they were permitted to enter

Good farm optioned by Resettlement Administration fifty miles north of Ithaca, New York.

William Stamper and wife who have lived in the Ozarks for fifty years. Missouri

Background photograph for Hightstown project. Play street for children. Sixth Street and Avenue C, New York City. The Solomon family who are to be resettled at Hightstown, live in this neighborhood. This Resettlement Administration project includes two hundred and fifty homes, four hundred and fourteen acres of farmland, a modern factory, utilities, including water system, recreation area and lake. Each family will have a modern home and an opportunity to work in a cooperative factory. Also a small plot of land for raising garden vegetables

Home of farmer who has raised cotton for fifty years on his own land. Greene County, Georgia

Preparing dinner for the six hundred fifty flood refugees encamped at Tent City near Shawneetown, Illinois

Rammed earth construction near Birmingham, Alabama. Under tamping the earth is compressed approximately fifty percent

Plantation house where the Wray family has lived for generations. A cotton plantation of 2700 acres, employing fifty tenant families in 1918 and seven tenant families in 1937. Greene County, Georgia

Auto camp north of Calipatria, California. Approximately eighty families from the Dust Bowl are camped here. They pay fifty cents a week. The only available work now is agricultural labor

Home of farmer who has raised cotton for fifty years on his own land. Greene County, Georgia

The tractor driver is colored. His wages when he works is one dollar and fifty cents a day as long as there is daylight. Aldridge Plantation, Mississippi

House in which cotton farmer has lived for fifty years. Macon County, Georgia

Auto camp north of Calipatria, California. Approximately eighty families from the Dust Bowl are camped here. They pay fifty cents a week. The only available work now is agricultural labor

Wife and child of sharecropper near Gaffney, South Carolina. The farmer does a little day labor for his landlord. He received fifty cents a day in 1936, sixty to seventy-five cents in 1937. He raised seven bales of cotton on thirteen acres; half to his landlord

Auto camp north of Calipatria, California. Approximately eighty families from the Dust Bowl are camped here. They pay fifty cents a week. The only available work now is agricultural labor

6:40 p.m. Tip Estes, hired man near Fowler, Indiana, filling an automatic hog waterer. He has to carry eighty gallons of water fifty yards to fill this

Aboard a trap fishing boat, delivering fish at the freezer. Most of the trap boats are owned by the freezers. Men work on shares, the company gets fifty percent. Prices are set according to days supply in all traps. As in almost all cases traps share equally in a day's run. Fishermen get little money either way--they either sell little fish for a comparatively decent price, or much fish for very little. Provincetown, Massachusetts

Old auto and Advance Rumley tractor in junkyard at Wildrose, North Dakota. Tractor cost six or seven thousand dollars and burned. A mixture of about fifty percent kerosene and fifty percent water. The water was added to keep the valves from overheating

Aboard a trap fishing boat, delivering fish at freezer. Most of the trap boats are owned by the freezer. Men work on shares, the company fifty percent. Prices are set according to day's supply in all traps. As in almost all cases traps share equally in a day's run. Fishermen get little either way, they either sell little fish for a comparatively decent price or much fish for little. Provincetown, Massachusetts

Henry Lotz closing the gate to the barns at the Midway City Dairy Association, near Santa Ana. Orange County, California. Seven families obtained a loan of seven thousand eight hundred fifty dollars from the Resettlement Administration payable in installments over a period of five years and and started a cooperative. From their earnings and wages they have met every payment when due. Henry Lotz says "This Resettlement loan, it's a future to us from the bidding platform for old age labor"

Auto camp north of Calipatria, California. Approximately eighty families from the Dust Bowl are camped here. They pay fifty cents a week. The only available work now is agricultural labor

A colony of twenty adobe houses built by the inhabitants with materials supplied by the Great Western Sugar Company. Thirteen of the houses are used, seven being unfit for habitation. In the thirteen houses, there live approximately fifty people. Being in limits of an incorporated town (Hudson) there is a water system. However, there is only one outlet (an outdoor spigot) for this whole colony. No electricity, gas or sewerage system

Home of rural rehabilitation client, Tulare County, California. They bought twenty acres of raw unimproved land with a first payment of fifty dollars which was money saved out of relief budget (August 1936). They received a Farm Security Administration (FSA) loan of seven hundred dollars for stock and equipment. Now they have a one-room shack, seven cows, three sows, and homemade pumping plant, along with ten acres of improved permanent pasture. Cream check approximately thirty dollars per month. Husband also works about ten days a month outside the farm. Husband is twenty-six years old, wife twenty-two, three small children. Been in California five years. "Piece by piece this place gets put together. One more piece of pipe and our water tank will be finished."

Rural rehabilitation, Tulare County, California. This family had been on relief. They are now re-established on a small farm, where their cash outlay for food is about two dollars and fifty cents a week for a family of seven

Home of rural rehabilitation client. Tulare County, California. They bought twenty acres of raw unimproved land with a first payment of fifty dollars which was money saved out of relief budget (August 1936). They received a FSA (Farm Security Administration) loan of seven hundred dollars for stock and equipment. Now they have a one-room shack, seven cows, three sows, and homemade pumping plant, along with ten acres of improved permanent pasture. Cream check approximately thirty dollars a month. Husband also works about ten days a month on odd jobs outside the farm. Husband is twenty-six years old, wife twenty-two. Three small children. Been in California five years. "Piece by piece this place gets put together. One more piece of pipe and our water tank will be finished."

Home of rural rehabilitation client, Tulare County, California. They bought twenty acres of raw unimproved land with a first payment of fifty dollars which was money saved out of relief budget (August 1936). They received a Farm Security Administration (FSA) loan of seven hundred dollars for stock and equipment. Now they have a one-room shack, seven cows, three sows, and homemade pumping plant, along with ten acres of improved permanent pasture. Cream check approximately thirty dollars per month. Husband also works about ten days a month outside the farm. Husband is twenty-six years old, wife twenty-two, three small children. Been in California five years. "Piece by piece this place gets put together. One more piece of pipe and our water tank will be finished."

A colony of twenty adobe houses built by the inhabitants with materials supplied by the Great Western Sugar Company. Thirteen of the houses are used; seven are being unfit to use for inhabitation. In the thirteen houses live approximately fifty people. Being in the limits of an incorporated town (Hudson) there is a water system. However there is only one outlet (an outdoor spigot) for this whole colony. No electricity, gas or sewerage system. Colorado

One of the four outhouses which serve fifty people. Great Western Sugar Company's beet sugar workers' colony at Hudson, Colorado

Small cotton farm, Kern County, California. The farmer keeps accounts. Each picker weighs his sack of cotton. In this case the sack weighs approximately fifty pounds. Took three hours to pick, for which, on basis of seventy-five cents per one hundred pounds of picked cotton, he will be paid thirty-eight cents

Rural rehabilitation, Tulare County, California. This family had been on relief. They are now re-established on a small farm, where their cash outlay for food is about two dollars and fifty cents a week for a family of seven

Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Negatives

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

Day laborers being hired for cotton picking on Mississippi and Arkansas plantations. Between four and six-thirty every morning during the season, near the Hallan Bridge in Memphis, Tennessee, crowds of Negroes in the streets gather and are loaded into trucks by drivers who bid, and offer them anywhere from fifty cents to one dollar per day

Uncle George who has worked in the blacksmith and carpentry shop on Marcella Plantation ever since he left prison fifty years ago. Mileston, Mississippi Delta, Mississippi

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

On the plains west of Fresno, California. Family of seven from Oregon dairy ranch which they lost. "We tried to get too big, I guess. Milk cans are all that's left of the dairy. Now pick bolls to make fifty cents to one dollar a day. We can't work every day or maybe we could get by." Rent for house without water or sanitation -six dollars per month. Plan next to pick fruit. "They say if you come to California, you always come back, but I'm willing to leave it."

Calipatria, Imperial Valley. In FSA (Farm Security Administration) emergency migratory labor camp. Left Oklahoma December 11, 1937 with husband and two children and son-in-law. Ex-tenant farmers on third and fourths in cotton. Had fifty dollars when set out. Went to Phoenix, picked cotton and pulled bolls, made eighty cents a day with two people picking bolls. Stayed until school closed. Went to Idaho, picked peas until August, left McCarl with forty dollars "in hand." Went to Cedar City and Parowan, Utah, a distance of 700 miles. Picked peas through September. Went to Hollister, Calipatria. Picked peas through October. Left for Calipatria for early peas which froze. Now receiving FSA food grant and waiting for work to begin. "Back in Oklahoma we was sinkin.' You work your head off for a crop and then see it burn up. You live in debts that you can never get out of. This isn't a good life, but I say it's a better life than that was."

Uncle George who has worked on Marcella Plantation in blacksmith and carpentry shop for last fifty years after he got out of prison, fixing his old car, Mileston, Mississippi Delta, Mississippi

Day laborers being hired for cotton picking on Mississippi and Arkansas plantations. Between four and six-thirty every morning during the season, near the Hallan Bridge in Memphis, Tennessee, crowds of Negroes in the streets gather and are loaded into trucks by drivers who bid, and offer them anywhere from fifty cents to one dollar per day

Migratory laborers' camp. Single-room cabin costs two dollars and fifty cents, double room four dollars per week. Water hauled, usually priced at fifty-five cents for fifty-five gallon tank. Toilet for about 150 people. Near Belle Glade, Florida

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

Day laborers being hired for cotton picking on Mississippi and Arkansas plantations. Between four and six-thirty every morning during the season, near the Hallan Bridge in Memphis, Tennessee, crowds of Negroes in the streets gather and are loaded into trucks by drivers who bid, and offer them anywhere from fifty cents to one dollar per day

Living conditions for migratory children in private auto camp during pea harvest. Tent space fifty cents a week. Outskirts of Calipatria, California

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

Uncle George, blacksmith and carpenter who came from prison as a boy to the Marcella Plantation and has lived there for fifty years. Mileston, Mississippi Delta, Mississippi

Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Negatives

Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Negatives

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

Loading truck in sugar beet field. Average wage of field worker: two dollars and fifty cents per day and dinner and supper during topping. Near Ontario, Malheur County, Oregon

C.N. Roberts who owns his own farm near Roseville, brought his cotton to the Lassiter gin in Knightdale, Wake County, North Carolina. This gin which is operated by Mr. Faison has ginned only two hundred and fifty bales of cotton this season and doesn't expect much more. The boll weevil got most of the cotton in that section. Because of the tobacco market holiday all the picking and ginning of cotton was finished very early this year

Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Negatives

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Negatives

Calipatria, Imperial County. Living conditions for migratory laborers in private auto camp. Tent space fifty cents a week. California

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

Squaw Valley farm. 640 acres, with sixty in tillable land, raises mainly livestock, Established about fifty years ago. Note shackes on small building in foreground. Ola self-help sawmill co-op supplied shingles for barn and grainery. Note new lumber for the mill piled in yard. Gem County, Idaho. General caption 48

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

The one-and-a-half story part of this house was built fifty to sixty years ago. The two-story part was built in 1900. Farm is owned by a woman whose husband died seventeen years ago. Person County, North Carolina

Day laborers being hired for cotton picking on Mississippi and Arkansas plantations. Between four and six-thirty every morning during the season, near the Hallan Bridge in Memphis, Tennessee, crowds of Negroes in the streets gather and are loaded into trucks by drivers who bid, and offer them anywhere from fifty cents to one dollar per day

Calipatria, Imperial Valley, In Farm Security Administration (FSA) emergency migratory labor camp. Daughter of ex-tenant farmers on thirds and fourths in cotton. Had fifty dollars when set out. Went to Phoenix, picked cotton, pulled bolls made eighty cents a day with two people pulling bolls. Stayed until school closed. Went to Idaho, picked peas until August. Left McCall with forty dollars "in hand." Went to Cedar City and Parowan, Utah, a distance of 700 miles. Picked peas through September. Went to Hollister, California. Picked peas through October. Left Hollister for Calipatria for early peas which froze. Now receiving Farm Security Administration food grant and waiting for work to begin. "Back in Oklahoma, we are sinking. You work your head off for a crop and then see it burn up. You live in debts that you can never get out of. This isn't a good life, but I say that it's a better life than it was."

The blacksmith and carpentry shop on Marcella Plantation, Mileston, Mississippi Delta. At the right is a piece of cotton hanging up which Uncle George the blacksmith who has lived there fifty years keeps for good luck. Mississippi

Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Negatives

Mr. and Mrs. E.H. Wise, and sons shelling peanuts for planting this year. They shell about fifty bushels, the yearly task of all families in this section at this season. Coffee County

Calipatria, Imperial County. Living conditions for migratory laborers in private auto camp. Tent space fifty cents a week

C.N. Roberts who owns his own farm near Roseville, brought his cotton to the Lassiter gin in Knightdale, Wake County, North Carolina. This gin which is operated by Mr. Faison has ginned only two hundred and fifty bales of cotton this season and doesn't expect much more. The boll weevil got most of the cotton in that section. Because of the tobacco market holiday all the picking and ginning of cotton was finished very early this year

Fifty grade children being made up for play about Indians (which grew out of their regular class studies) on May Day-Health Day program. Ashwood Plantations, South Carolina

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

Woodpiles along the street are a characteristic of Portland, Oregon. Costs five dollars and fifty cents per cord, and must be hauled thirty-five miles. (Shows homeowner on porch.) Portland, Oregon

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

Log house of rural non-farm family. House is over fifty years old. Orange County, North Carolina

Mr. and Mrs. E.H. Wise and sons shelling peanuts around the fireplace for planting this year. They shell about fifty bushels, the yearly task of all families in this section at this season. Coffee County, Alabama

Fred Maschman, TP client, was heavily in debt in 1937. At that time, his debt was reduced fifty percent by a Farm Debt Adjustment Committee. Iowa County, Iowa

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

Uncle George's blacksmith and carpentry shop. He has been on the plantation for fifty years. Marcella Plantation, Mileston, Mississippi

Migratory laborers' camp. Single-room cabin costs two dollars and fifty cents, double room four dollars per week. Water hauled, usually priced at fifty-five cents for fifty-five gallon tank. Toilet for about 150 people. Near Belle Glade, Florida

Living conditions for migratory laborers in private auto camp. Tent space fifty cents per week. Calipatria, Imperial County

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

Home of family living in Sumac Park, shacktown community outside of Yakima, Washington. Father is ill and unable to work. They are paying for land (three hundred and fifty dollars) at rate of seven dollars a month

Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Negatives

Washington, Yakima Valley, near Wapato. Name of Borrower, Edgar Hardt. On Tenant Purchase farm. Forty acres, price six thousand fifty dollars, all stock and machinery included. Diversified irrigated farm, raising grapes, tomatoes, cantaloupes and watermelons, sweet and field corn, hay and grain. They have six cows, hogs

Josh Taylor, Negro Foreman who has been on place for fifty three years, Knowlton Plantation, Perthshire, Mississippi Delta, Mississippi.

Uncle George, blacksmith and carpenter who came from prison as a boy to the Marcella Plantation and has lived there for fifty years. Mileston, Mississippi Delta, Mississippi

Woodpiles along the street are a characteristic of Portland, Oregon. Costs five dollars and fifty cents per cord, and must now be hauled thirty-five miles. Portland, Oregon

Uncle George who has worked on Marcella Plantation in blacksmith and carpentry shop for last fifty years after he got out of prison, fixing his old car, Mileston, Mississippi Delta, Mississippi

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

Meeting opens with taking the collection. Army contributes (about one dollar and fifty cents) again, as well as the audience. Salvation Army, San Francisco, California

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph

Squaw Valley farm. 640 acres, sixty in tillable land, raises mainly livestock. Established about fifty years ago. Note old shakes on small building in foreground. The Ola self-help sawmill co-op has supplied shingles for barn and grainery. Note new lumber from the mill, piled in yard. Gem County, Idaho. General caption 48

Cotton outside of Lassiter gin in Wendell, Wake County North Carolina. This gin which is operated by Mr. Faison has ginned only two hundred and fifty bales of cotton this whole season and doesn't expect much more. The boll weevil got most of the cotton in that season. Because of the tobacco market holiday, all the picking and ginning of cotton was finished very early this year

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration / Office of War Information Photograph