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Blue marlin being weighed on scales at the Oceanside Marina: Key West, Florida

nitrogen mineralization: Biospheric research in tropical ecosystems ARC-1987-AC87-0219-2

Orie Loucks, Chair of Ecosystems Studies for the State of Ohio (Miami University), conducting a field trip in Rock Creek

Researchers from the Smithsonian Institution hope their experiment in a local scrub oak community at KSC will yield new insights into the effects of increased carbon dioxide on natural vegetation. The experiment features a four-acre site just north of the Launch Complex 39 area. Increased amoounts of carbon dioxide are piped into 16 open-top chambers that house pristine Florida scrub vegetation, chosen because it is small and woody and fits in the chambers and can be controlled, yet has the attributes of much larger forests. Experts predict a doubling of the carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere during the next century, and the three-year KSC project being conducted by the Smithsonian-led team hopes that by simulating the increase, they can determine how natural ecosystems and vegetation will respond. Also participating in the effort are KSC, academic and international organizations. The study is being funded by a Department of energy grant KSC-96pc633

Researchers from the Smithsonian Institution hope their experiment in a local scrub oak community at KSC will yield new insights into the effects of increased carbon dioxide on natural vegetation. The experiment features a four-acre site just north of the Launch Complex 39 area. Increased amoounts of carbon dioxide are piped into 16 open-top chambers that house pristine Florida scrub vegetation, chosen because it is small and woody and fits in the chambers and can be controlled, yet has the attributes of much larger forests. Experts predict a doubling of the carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere during the next century, and the three-year KSC project being conducted by the Smithsonian-led team hopes that by simulating the increase, they can determine how natural ecosystems and vegetation will respond. Also participating in the effort are KSC, academic and international organizations. The study is being funded by a Department of energy grant KSC-96pc635

Researchers from the Smithsonian Institution hope their experiment in a local scrub oak community at KSC will yield new insights into the effects of increased carbon dioxide on natural vegetation. The experiment features a four-acre site just north of the Launch Complex 39 area. Increased amoounts of carbon dioxide are piped into 16 open-top chambers that house pristine Florida scrub vegetation, chosen because it is small and woody and fits in the chambers and can be controlled, yet has the attributes of much larger forests. Experts predict a doubling of the carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere during the next century, and the three-year KSC project being conducted by the Smithsonian-led team hopes that by simulating the increase, they can determine how natural ecosystems and vegetation will respond. Also participating in the effort are KSC, academic and international organizations. The study is being funded by a Department of energy grant KSC-96pc632

Researchers from the Smithsonian Institution hope their experiment in a local scrub oak community at KSC will yield new insights into the effects of increased carbon dioxide on natural vegetation. The experiment features a four-acre site just north of the Launch Complex 39 area. Increased amoounts of carbon dioxide are piped into 16 open-top chambers that house pristine Florida scrub vegetation, chosen because it is small and woody and fits in the chambers and can be controlled, yet has the attributes of much larger forests. Experts predict a doubling of the carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere during the next century, and the three-year KSC project being conducted by the Smithsonian-led team hopes that by simulating the increase, they can determine how natural ecosystems and vegetation will respond. Also participating in the effort are KSC, academic and international organizations. The study is being funded by a Department of energy grant KSC-96pc634

Deputy Secretary of Agriculture James Moseley speaking at dedication ceremony for new facility, at University of Florida Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center in Davie, Florida, devoted to eradication of invasive species and protection of fragile wetlands ecosystems

Deputy Secretary of Agriculture James Moseley speaking at dedication ceremony for new facility, at University of Florida Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center in Davie, Florida, devoted to eradication of invasive species and protection of fragile wetlands ecosystems

Florida Congressman E. Clay Shaw, Jr. speaking at dedication ceremony for new facility, at University of Florida Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center in Davie, Florida, devoted to eradication of invasive species and protection of fragile wetlands ecosystems

Florida Congressman E. Clay Shaw, Jr. speaking at dedication ceremony for new facility, at University of Florida Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center in Davie, Florida, devoted to eradication of invasive species and protection of fragile wetlands ecosystems

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC employees stop at a display table about energy set up in a tent near the Operations and Checkout Building for KSC’s annual Environmental and Energy Awareness Week, held April 20-22. The slogan for this year’s event was “Today's Conservation Defines Tomorrow's Future.” Presentations included Chemistry Safety, Cost-Effective Solar Applications, Non-Native Invasive Plant Identification and Control, and Historical Changes in KSC’s Ecosystems. KSC-04pd0957

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Mario Busacca, with the Safety, Occupational Health and Environmental Division, handles a snake at one of the exhibits for KSC’s annual Environmental and Energy Awareness Week, held April 20-22. Presentations included Chemistry Safety, Cost-Effective Solar Applications, Non-Native Invasive Plant Identification and Control, Energy Efficient Lighting Systems, and Historical Changes in KSC’s Ecosystems. The slogan for this year’s event was “Today's Conservation Defines Tomorrow's Future.” KSC-04pd0956

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC employees stop at display tables set up in a tent near the Operations and Checkout Building for KSC’s annual Environmental and Energy Awareness Week, held April 20-22. The slogan for this year’s event was “Today's Conservation Defines Tomorrow's Future.” Presentations included Chemistry Safety, Cost-Effective Solar Applications, Non-Native Invasive Plant Identification and Control, Energy Efficient Lighting Systems, and Historical Changes in KSC’s Ecosystems. KSC-04pd0958

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A KSC employee stops to look at a car equipped to use natural gas as fuel. Several cars using alternative fuel technology were part of an exhibit during KSC’s annual Environmental and Energy Awareness Week, held April 20-22. The slogan for this year’s event was “Today's Conservation Defines Tomorrow's Future.” Presentations included Chemistry Safety, Cost-Effective Solar Applications, Non-Native Invasive Plant Identification and Control, Energy Efficient Lighting Systems, and Historical Changes in KSC’s Ecosystems. KSC-04pd0954

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - KSC employees stop at display tables set up in a tent near the Operations and Checkout Building for KSC’s annual Environmental and Energy Awareness Week, held April 20-22. The slogan for this year’s event was “Today's Conservation Defines Tomorrow's Future.” Presentations included Chemistry Safety, Cost-Effective Solar Applications, Non-Native Invasive Plant Identification and Control, Energy Efficient Lighting Systems, and Historical Changes in KSC’s Ecosystems. KSC-04pd0955

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A gopher tortoise makes its way down the hill behind the NASA KSC News Center. The sandy soils of Florida are prime habitat for the species, the only one in Florida. Gopher tortoises thrive in many of our ecosystems, pine-oak sandhills, oak hammocks, prairies, flatwoods and coastal dunes. This and other wildlife abound throughout KSC as it shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, home to some of the nation’s rarest and most unusual species of wildlife. The wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. In addition, the Refuge supports 19 endangered or threatened wildlife species on Federal or State lists, more than any other single refuge in the U.S. Gopher tortoises are protected by law in Florida and are listed as a Species of Special Concern. KSC-05pd2344

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Vehicle Assembly Building, or VAB, is seen during a field-guided boat tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4867

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Vehicle Assembly Building, or VAB, and NASA's new mobile launcher, or ML, are seen in the distance during a field-guided boat tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The 355-foot-tall ML structure, which took about two years to construct, will be modified by NASA’s Ground Systems Development and Operations, or GSDO, Program to support NASA’s Space Launch System, the heavy-lift rocket that will launch astronauts into deep space on future exploration missions. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4860

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Vehicle Assembly Building, or VAB, and NASA's new mobile launcher, or ML, are seen in the distance during a field-guided boat tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The 355-foot-tall ML structure, which took about two years to construct, will be modified by NASA’s Ground Systems Development and Operations, or GSDO, Program to support NASA’s Space Launch System, the heavy-lift rocket that will launch astronauts into deep space on future exploration missions. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4859

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A boat dock and skiff boat are seen near the Roy D. Bridges Jr. Bridge that connects NASA Kennedy Space Center's Industrial Area to Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Industrial Area following a field-guided boat tour. As part of the Kennedy's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of the center and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4880

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Solid Motor Assembly Building, or SMAB, is seen in the distance during a field-guided boat tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4870

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Launch Complex 37 and the Atlas V Operations Center, or ASOC, are seen in the distance during a field-guided boat tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4875

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Operations Support Building II, or OSBII, is seen in the distance during a field-guided boat tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4857

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Launch Pads 39A, right, and 39B, left, are seen in the distance during a field-guided boat tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4856

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Aquatic biologists Eric Reyier, left, and Doug Scheidt with Innovative Health Applications, or IHA, prepare for a field-guided boat tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4845

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Vehicle Assembly Building, or VAB, is seen in the distance during a field-guided boat tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4849

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Solid Motor Assembly and Readiness Facility, or SMARF, Space Launch Complex 40, and Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, facility, is seen in the distance during a field-guided boat tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4874

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Vehicle Assembly Building, or VAB, and NASA's new mobile launcher, or ML, are seen during a field-guided boat tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The 355-foot-tall ML structure, which took about two years to construct, will be modified by NASA’s Ground Systems Development and Operations, or GSDO, Program to support NASA’s Space Launch System, the heavy-lift rocket that will launch astronauts into deep space on future exploration missions. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4865

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Launch Pad 39A is seen during a field-guided boat tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4851

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Roy D. Bridges Jr. Bridge connecting NASA Kennedy Space Center's Industrial Area to Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Industrial Area is seen during a field-guided boat tour. As part of the Kennedy's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of the center and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4879

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Aquatic biologist Eric Reyier with Innovative Health Applications, or IHA, drives a skiff boat during a field-guided tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Aquatic biologist Doug Scheidt searches for landmarks and wildlife during the tour. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4850

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Roy D. Bridges Jr. Bridge connecting NASA Kennedy Space Center's Industrial Area to Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Industrial Area is seen during a field-guided boat tour. As part of the Kennedy's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of the center and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4876

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Launch Complex 39 is seen during a field-guided boat tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4862

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A manatee splashes in the Banana River during a field-guided boat tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Manatees are one of the many threatened or endangered species that call the refuge home. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4871

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Vehicle Assembly Building, or VAB, and NASA's new mobile launcher, or ML, are seen during a field-guided boat tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The 355-foot-tall ML structure, which took about two years to construct, will be modified by NASA’s Ground Systems Development and Operations, or GSDO, Program to support NASA’s Space Launch System, the heavy-lift rocket that will launch astronauts into deep space on future exploration missions. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4864

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Launch Pad 39A is seen during a field-guided boat tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4853

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The NASA News Center and Operations Support Building II, or OSBII, in Launch Complex 39 are seen in the distance during a field-guided boat tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4866

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Space Launch Complex 41 and the Vertical Integration Facility, or VIF, are seen in the distance during a field-guided boat tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4854

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Operations Support Building II, or OSBII, left, and the Vehicle Assembly Building, or VAB, are seen in the distance during a field-guided boat tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4858

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Launch Pad 39A is seen in the distance during a field-guided boat tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4846

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A boat dock and the Roy D. Bridges Jr. Bridge connecting NASA Kennedy Space Center's Industrial Area to Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Industrial Area are seen during a field-guided boat tour. As part of the Kennedy's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of the center and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4878

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Aquatic biologist Eric Reyier with Innovative Health Applications, or IHA, talks about the work that goes into protecting the natural habitat at a launch operations center during a field-guided boat tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. In the background is Kennedy's Launch Complex 39. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4868

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Aquatic biologists Doug Scheidt, left, and Eric Reyier with Innovative Health Applications, or IHA, lead a field-guided boat tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4869

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Solid Motor Assembly and Readiness Facility, or SMARF, Space Launch Complex 40, Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, facility, and Solid Motor Assembly Building, or SMAB, are seen in the distance during a field-guided boat tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4847

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Vehicle Assembly Building, or VAB, and NASA's new mobile launcher, or ML, are seen in the distance during a field-guided boat tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The 355-foot-tall ML structure, which took about two years to construct, will be modified by NASA’s Ground Systems Development and Operations, or GSDO, Program to support NASA’s Space Launch System, the heavy-lift rocket that will launch astronauts into deep space on future exploration missions. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4855

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Vehicle Assembly Building, or VAB, is seen in the distance during a field-guided boat tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4848

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Solid Motor Assembly Building, or SMAB, and Launch Complex 37 are seen in the distance during a field-guided boat tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4873

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Launch Pad 39A is seen during a field-guided boat tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4852

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Vehicle Assembly Building, or VAB, is seen during a field-guided boat tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4861

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Roy D. Bridges Jr. Bridge connecting NASA Kennedy Space Center's Industrial Area to Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Industrial Area is seen during a field-guided boat tour. As part of the Kennedy's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of the center and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4877

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Vehicle Assembly Building, or VAB, is seen during a field-guided boat tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4863

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A manatee swims in the Banana River during a field-guided boat tour of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. As part of the center's first-ever Innovation Expo, the tour, called "Living Outdoor Laboratory for Environmental Sustainability," is giving employees the opportunity to see the unique estuarine ecosystems that are protected from development by the presence of Kennedy and the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Manatees are one of the many threatened or endangered species that call the refuge home. The diverse and healthy area encompassing about 140,000 acres of central Florida's east coast has been closed to the public for 50 years, allowing the coastal dunes, saltwater estuaries and marshes, freshwater impoundments, scrub, pine flatwoods, and hardwood hammocks to provide habitats for more than 1,000 species of plants and animals. Innovation Expo is showcasing the innovative work taking place throughout the center's facilities and labs to encourage employees to work together to solve future challenges. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/kennedy. Photo credit: NASA KSC-2012-4872

Carbon & Ecosystems

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Secretary Gale Norton speaking at dedication ceremony for new facility, at University of Florida Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center in Davie, Florida, devoted to eradication of invasive species and protection of fragile wetlands ecosystems

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Officials on hand for visit of Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species and protection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleucaplant

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Secretary Gale Norton speaking at dedication ceremony for new facility, at University of Florida Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center in Davie, Florida, devoted to eradication of invasive species and protection of fragile wetlands ecosystems

Secretary Gale Norton speaking at dedication ceremony for new facility, at University of Florida Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center in Davie, Florida, devoted to eradication of invasive species and protection of fragile wetlands ecosystems

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Officials on hand for visit of Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species and protection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleucaplant

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Officials on hand for visit of Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species and protection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleucaplant

Officials on hand for visit of Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species and protection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleucaplant

Secretary Gale Norton speaking at dedication ceremony for new facility, at University of Florida Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center in Davie, Florida, devoted to eradication of invasive species and protection of fragile wetlands ecosystems

Secretary Gale Norton speaking at dedication ceremony for new facility, at University of Florida Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center in Davie, Florida, devoted to eradication of invasive species and protection of fragile wetlands ecosystems

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant

Earth Day-related visit by Secretary Gale Norton to south Florida to view work of new facility in Davie devoted to eradication of invasive species andprotection of fragile wetlands ecosystems, and to view ceremonial release into the Everglades of a sap-sucking bug to fight harmful spread of melaleuca plant