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Workmen at the Kennedy Space Center position the nose cone for the 204LM-1, an unmanned Apollo mission that tested the Apollo Lunar Module (LM) in Earth orbit. Also known as Apollo 5, the spacecraft was launched on the fourth Saturn IBC launch vehicle. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as an interim vehicle in MSFC's "building block" approach to the Saturn rocket development, the Saturn IBC utilized Saturn I technology to further develop and refine a larger booster and the Apollo spacecraft capabilities required for the manned lunar missions. n/a

Workmen at the Kennedy Space Center hoist the Saturn Lunar Module (LM) Adapter into position during assembly of the 204LM-1, an unmanned Apollo mission that tested the Apollo Lunar Module in Earth orbit. Also known as Apollo 5, the spacecraft was launched on the fourth Saturn IB launch vehicle. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as an interim vehicle in MSFC's "building block" approach to the Saturn rocket development, the Saturn IB utilized Saturn I technology to further develop and refine a larger booster and the Apollo spacecraft capabilities required for the manned lunar missions. n/a

Workmen at the Kennedy Space Center position the nose cone for the 204LM-1, an unmanned Apollo mission that tested the Apollo Lunar Module (LM) in Earth orbit. Also known as Apollo 5, the spacecraft was launched on the fourth Saturn IBC launch vehicle. Developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) as an interim vehicle in MSFC's "building block" approach to the Saturn rocket development, the Saturn IBC utilized Saturn I technology to further develop and refine a larger booster and the Apollo spacecraft capabilities required for the manned lunar missions. n/a

The astronauts enter the spacecraft. After launch and Saturn V first-stage burnout and jettison, the S-II second stage ignites. The crew checks spacecraft systems in Earth orbit before the S-IVB third stage ignites the second time to send Apollo 11 to the Moon KSC-69-h-960

SL2-04-118 (June 1973) --- A color photograph of the San Francisco Bay, California area, taken from the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. (The picture should be held with the clouds and Pacific Ocean on the left.) Note the thickly populated and highly developed area around the bay. Among the cities visible are San Francisco, Oakland, Berkeley and San Jose. This view extends eastward to show a portion of the San Joaquin Valley. This photograph was taken by one of the six lenses of the Itek-furnished S190-A Multispectral Photographic Facility Experiment in the Multiple Docking Adapter of the space station. Type SO-356 film was used. The S190-A experiment is part of the Skylab Earth Resources Experiments Package (EREP). Photo credit: NASA SL2-04-118

SL2-16-281 (June 1973) --- A vertical view of the Orlando and central Florida area photographed from the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. (The picture should be held with the heaviest cloud cover at the bottom.) The extensive road and highway network in the area is clearly visible. The Lakeland and Winter Haven area is near the center of the picture. Interstate 4 extends southwesterly out of Orlando through the center of the picture. The urban growth caused by the opening of the Disney World amusement complex is clearly evident. The giant recreational facility is just southwest of Orlando. This picture was taken by one of the six lenses of the Itek-furnished S190-A Multispectral Photographic Facility Experiment in the Multiple Docking Adapter of the space station. Type SO-356 film was used. Photo credit: NASA SL2-16-281

SL3-108-1288 (July-Sept. 1973) --- Astronaut Owen K. Garriott, science pilot of the Skylab 3 mission, is stationed at the Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) console in the Multiple Docking Adapter (MDA) of the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. This picture was taken with a handheld 35mm Nikon camera. Astronauts Garriott, Alan L. Bean and Jack R. Lousma remained with the Skylab space station cluster in orbit for 59 days conducting numerous medical, scientific and technological experiments. In orbit the MDA functions as a major experiment control center for solar observations. From this console the astronauts actively control the ATM solar physics telescopes. Photo credit: NASA SL3-108-01288

SL3-111-1516 (July-September 1973) --- Astronaut Alan L. Bean, Skylab 3 commander, uses a battery powered shaver in the crew quarters of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) aboard the Skylab space station cluster in Earth orbit. Astronaut Bean, Owen K. Garriott, science pilot, and Jack R. Lousma, pilot, went on to successfully complete 59 days aboard the Skylab cluster in Earth orbit. Photo credit: NASA SL3-111-01516

SL3-111-1519 (6 Aug. 1973) --- Scientist-astronaut Owen K. Garriott, Skylab 3 science pilot, reconstitutes a pre-packaged container of food at the crew quarters ward room table of the Orbital Workshop (OWS) of the Skylab Space Station cluster. This picture was taken with a hand-held 35mm Nikon camera. Astronauts Garriott, Alan L. Bean and Jack R. Lousma remained with the Skylab Space Station in Earth orbit for a total of 59 days conducting numerous medical, scientific and technological experiments. Note the knife and fork on the food tray and the utensil with which Garriott stirs the food mixed with water. Skylab is the first manned space program by NASA which affords the crew men an opportunity to eat with the same type utensils used on Earth. Photo credit: NASA SL3-111-01519

View of Skylab space station cluster in Earth orbit from CSM

The orbiter Columbia sits on Rogers Drylake Runway 23 at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center after its return from Earth orbit. Columbia's landing completed the first full test of the Space Transportation System

An overhead view of a life-size replica of a large Soviet communications satellite recently launched into Earth orbit. The craft is on display in one of the pavilions of the Exhibition of Soviet National Economic Achievement

A life-size replica of a large Soviet communications satellite recently launched into Earth orbit. The craft is on display in one of the pavilions of the Exhibition of Soviet National Economic Achievement

A view of a model of the first stage of a two-stage horizontal takeoff and landing vehicle designed to place shuttle class payloads in low earth orbit. The model will be used in launcher studies by the Aeromechanics Division of the Flight Dynamics Laboratory

A close-up view of a model of the first stage of a two-stage horizontal takeoff and landing vehicle designed to place shuttle class payloads in low earth orbit. The model will be used in launcher studies by the Aeromechanics Division of the Flight Dynamics Laboratory

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The space shuttle Discovery and its five-man crew is launched from pad 39B at 11:37 a.m. as STS-26 embarks on a four-day mission marking America's return to space. On the first day of orbit, the crew will deploy from the orbiter's payload bay the primary payload, the Tracking and Date Relay Satellite, or TDRS-C. The inertial upper stage, or IUS, will boost the satellite to a geosynchronous altitude from low Earth orbit. When it place, TDRS-C will relay date from low Earth orbiting spacecraft and air-to-ground voice communications sand television from shape shuttle orbiters during missions. The crew members of STST-26 are Commander Rick Hauck, Pilot Richard Covey, and Mission Specialists Dave Hilmers, Mike Lounge and George "Pinky" Nelson. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-88PC-1014

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The space shuttle Discovery and its five-man crew is launched from pad 39B at 11:37 a.m. as STS-26 embarks on a four-day mission marking America's return to space. On the first day of orbit, the crew will deploy from the orbiter's payload bay the primary payload, the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite, or TDRS-C. The inertial upper stage, or IUS, will boost the satellite to a geosynchronous altitude from low Earth orbit. When it place, TDRS-C will relay date from low Earth orbiting spacecraft and air-to-ground voice communications sand television from shape shuttle orbiters during missions. The crew members of STST-26 are Commander Rick Hauck, Pilot Richard Covey, and mission specialists Dave Hilmers, Mike Lounge and George "Pinky" Nelson. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-88PC-1018

41C-15-544 - STS-41C - View of SMM in earth orbit from flight deck windows

41C-15-550 - STS-41C - View of SMM in earth orbit from flight deck windows

41C-15-542 - STS-41C - View of SMM in earth orbit from flight deck windows

41C-15-548 - STS-41C - View of SMM in earth orbit from flight deck windows

41C-15-543 - STS-41C - View of SMM in earth orbit from flight deck windows

41C-15-546 - STS-41C - View of SMM in earth orbit from flight deck windows

41C-15-549 - STS-41C - View of SMM in earth orbit from flight deck windows

41C-15-541 - STS-41C - View of SMM in earth orbit from flight deck windows

41C-15-547 - STS-41C - View of SMM in earth orbit from flight deck windows

41C-15-545 - STS-41C - View of SMM in earth orbit from flight deck windows

STS093-S-001 (September 1998) --- This is the STS-93 mission insignia designed by the crew members. Space shuttle Columbia will carry the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) into low Earth orbit initiating its planned five-year astronomy mission. AXAF is the third of NASA's great observatories, following the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO). AXAF will provide scientists and order-of magnitude improvement over current capabilities at X-ray wavelengths. In the words of the crew, "Observations of X-ray emissions from energetic galaxies and clusters, as well as black holes, promise to greatly expand current understanding of the origin and evolution of our universe." The patch depicts AXAF separating from the space shuttle Columbia after a successful deployment. A spiral galaxy is shown in the background as a possible target for AXAF observations. The two flags represent the international crew, consisting of astronauts from both the United States and France. The NASA insignia design for space shuttle flights is reserved for use by the astronauts and for other official use as the NASA Administrator may authorize. Public availability has been approved only in the forms of illustrations by the various news media. When and if there is any change in this policy, which is not anticipated, the change will be publicly announced. Photo credit: NASA sts093-s-001

STS095-S-009 (29 Oct. 1998) --- The space shuttle Discovery lifts off Launch Pad 39B to begin a nine-day mission in Earth-orbit. Launch was at 2:19 p.m. (EST), Oct. 29, 1998. Onboard were Curtis L. Brown Jr., Steven W. Lindsey, Scott F. Parazynski, Steven K. Robinson, Pedro Duque, United States Senator John H. Glenn Jr. and Chiaki Naito-Mukai. Duque is a mission specialist representing the European Space Agency (ESA) and Mukai is a payload specialist representing Japan's National Space Development Agency (NASDA). Glenn, making his second spaceflight but his first in 36 years, joins Mukai as a payload specialist on the mission. Photo credit: NASA sts095-s-009

STS095-S-005 (29 Oct. 1998) --- Partially framed by Florida foliage, the space shuttle Discovery lifts off Launch Pad 39B to begin a nine-day mission in Earth orbit. Launch was at 2:19 p.m. (EST), Oct. 29, 1998. Onboard were Curtis L. Brown Jr., Steven W. Lindsey, Scott E. Parazynski, Steven K. Robinson, Pedro Duque, United States Senator John H. Glenn Jr. and Chiaki Naito-Mukai. Duque is a mission specialist representing the European Space Agency (ESA) and Mukai is a payload specialist representing Japan's National Space Development Agency (NASDA). Glenn, making his second spaceflight but his first in 36 years, joins Mukai as a payload specialist on the mission. Photo credit: NASA sts095-s-005

At Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the first stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket is nearing erection in the launch gantry on pad 36A. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the NASA/Lockheed Martin GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing KSC-00pp0416

Workers at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station prepare to erect the first stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket in the launch gantry on pad 36A. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the NASA/Lockheed Martin GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing KSC00pp0412

At Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the first stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket is slowly raised in the launch gantry on pad 36A. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the NASA/Lockheed Martin GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing KSC-00pp0415

Workers at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station prepare to erect the first stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket in the launch gantry on pad 36A. Shown are the rocket thrusters. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the NASA/Lockheed Martin GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing KSC-00pp0413

At Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the first stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket is slowly raised in the launch gantry on pad 36A. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the NASA/Lockheed Martin GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing KSC00pp0415

The first stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket stands erect in the launch gantry on pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the NASA/Lockheed Martin GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing KSC00pp0417

Workers at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station prepare to erect the first stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket in the launch gantry on pad 36A. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the NASA/Lockheed Martin GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing KSC-00pp0412

At Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the first stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket begins erection in the launch gantry on pad 36A. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the NASA/Lockheed Martin GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing KSC00pp0414

At Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the first stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket begins erection in the launch gantry on pad 36A. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the NASA/Lockheed Martin GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing KSC-00pp0414

Workers at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station prepare to erect the first stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket in the launch gantry on pad 36A. Shown are the rocket thrusters. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the NASA/Lockheed Martin GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing KSC00pp0413

At Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the first stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket is nearing erection in the launch gantry on pad 36A. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the NASA/Lockheed Martin GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing KSC00pp0416

The first stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket stands erect in the launch gantry on pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the NASA/Lockheed Martin GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing KSC-00pp0417

The second stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket arrives on pad 36-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, for mating with the first stage. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing KSC-00pp0421

The second stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket arrives on pad 36-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, for mating with the first stage. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing KSC00pp0421

At launch pad 36-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, workers check over the second stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket before it is lifted up the gantry (behind it) for mating with the first stage. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing KSC00pp0424

The second stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket is raised to a vertical position in front of the gantry on pad 36-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, for mating with the first stage. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing KSC00pp0422

At launch pad 36-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the second stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket is lifted up the gantry (behind it) for mating with the first stage. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing KSC-00pp0425

The second stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket is raised to a vertical position in front of the gantry on pad 36-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, for mating with the first stage. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing KSC-00pp0422

At launch pad 36-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the second stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket is lifted up the gantry (behind it) for mating with the first stage. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing KSC00pp0425

At launch pad 36-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, workers check over the second stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket before it is lifted up the gantry (behind it) for mating with the first stage. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing KSC-00pp0424

Workers at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station watch as the second stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket is raised to a vertical position in front of the gantry on pad 36-A. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing KSC00pp0423

At launch pad 36-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, cables help guide the second stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket as it is lifted up the gantry (behind it) for mating with the first stage. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing KSC-00pp0426

Workers at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station watch as the second stage of an Atlas II/Centaur rocket is raised to a vertical position in front of the gantry on pad 36-A. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing KSC-00pp0423

The GOES-L satellite arrives on pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The Atlas IIA rocket is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing. Launch is scheduled for May 3 KSC-00pp0540

The GOES-L satellite is ready for mating with the lower stages of the Atlas IIA rocket on pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing. Launch is scheduled for May 3 KSC-00pp0542

The GOES-L satellite arrives on pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The Atlas IIA rocket is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing. Launch is scheduled for May 3 KSC00pp0540

The GOES-L satellite is lifted up the gantry on pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. the Atlas IIA is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing. Launch is scheduled for May 3 KSC-00pp0541

The GOES-L satellite is ready for mating with the lower stages of the Atlas IIA rocket on pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Atlas II is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing. Launch is scheduled for May 3 KSC00pp0542

The GOES-L satellite is lifted up the gantry on pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. the Atlas IIA is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing. Launch is scheduled for May 3 KSC00pp0541

The GOES-L satellite is about midway in its journey up the gantry on pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The Atlas IIA rocket is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing. Launch is scheduled for May 3 KSC-00pp0543

The GOES-L satellite, after being lifted up to the top of the gantry on pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, is ready for mating with the Atlas IIA/Centaur rocket. Atlas IIA is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing. Launch is scheduled for May 3 KSC-00pp0545

The GOES-L satellite, after being lifted up to the top of the gantry on pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, is ready for mating with the Atlas IIA/Centaur rocket. Atlas IIA is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing. Launch is scheduled for May 3 KSC00pp0545

The GOES-L satellite approaches the end of its journey up the gantry on pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, for mating with the Atlas IIA/Centaur rocket. The Atlas IIA is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing. Launch is scheduled for May 3 KSC00pp0544

The GOES-L satellite is about midway in its journey up the gantry on pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The Atlas IIA rocket is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing. Launch is scheduled for May 3 KSC00pp0543

The GOES-L satellite approaches the end of its journey up the gantry on pad 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, for mating with the Atlas IIA/Centaur rocket. The Atlas IIA is designed to launch payloads into low earth orbit, geosynchronous transfer orbit or geosynchronous orbit. The rocket is the launch vehicle for the GOES-L satellite, part of the NOAA National Weather Service system in weather imagery and atmospheric sounding information. The primary objective of the GOES-L is to provide a full capability satellite in an on-orbit storage condition, to assure NOAA continuity in services from a two-satellite constellation. Launch services are being provided by the 45th Space Wing. Launch is scheduled for May 3 KSC-00pp0544

At the Shuttle Landing Facility, the crated Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS-H) is placed onto a transporter for its move to the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2) for testing. The TDRS is one of three (labeled H, I and J) being built in the Hughes Space and Communications Company Integrated Satellite Factory in El Segundo, Calif. The latest TDRS uses an innovative springback antenna design. A pair of 15-foot-diameter, flexible mesh antenna reflectors fold up for launch, then spring back into their original cupped circular shape on orbit. The new satellites will augment the TDRS system’s existing Sand Ku-band frequencies by adding Ka-band capability. TDRS will serve as the sole means of continuous, high-data-rate communication with the space shuttle, with the International Space Station upon its completion, and with dozens of unmanned scientific satellites in low earth orbit. The TDRS is scheduled to be launched from CCAFS June 29 aboard an Atlas IIA/Centaur rocket KSC-00pp0708

The crated Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS-H) is pulled inside the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2) after its arrival at KSC. The TDRS will undergo testing in the SAEF-2. One of three satellites (labeled H, I and J) being built in the Hughes Space and Communications Company Integrated Satellite Factory in El Segundo, Calif., the latest TDRS uses an innovative springback antenna design. A pair of 15-foot-diameter, flexible mesh antenna reflectors fold up for launch, then spring back into their original cupped circular shape on orbit. The new satellites will augment the TDRS system’s existing Sand Ku-band frequencies by adding Ka-band capability. TDRS will serve as the sole means of continuous, high-data-rate communication with the space shuttle, with the International Space Station upon its completion, and with dozens of unmanned scientific satellites in low earth orbit. The TDRS is scheduled to be launched from CCAFS June 29 aboard an Atlas IIA/Centaur rocket KSC-00pp0711

At the Shuttle Landing Facility, the crated Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS-H) is offloaded from an air cargo plane. It will be taken to the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2) for testing. The TDRS is one of three (labeled H, I and J) being built in the Hughes Space and Communications Company Integrated Satellite Factory in El Segundo, Calif. The latest TDRS uses an innovative springback antenna design. A pair of 15-foot-diameter, flexible mesh antenna reflectors fold up for launch, then spring back into their original cupped circular shape on orbit. The new satellites will augment the TDRS system’s existing Sand Ku-band frequencies by adding Ka-band capability. TDRS will serve as the sole means of continuous, high-data-rate communication with the space shuttle, with the International Space Station upon its completion, and with dozens of unmanned scientific satellites in low earth orbit. The TDRS is scheduled to be launched from CCAFS June 29 aboard an Atlas IIA/Centaur rocket KSC-00pp0707

At the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2), a crane lowers the crated Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS-H) onto the ground. It was transported to SAEF-2 on the truckbed at right. The TDRS will undergo testing in SAEF-2. One of three satellites (labeled H, I and J) being built in the Hughes Space and Communications Company Integrated Satellite Factory in El Segundo, Calif., the latest TDRS uses an innovative springback antenna design. A pair of 15-foot-diameter, flexible mesh antenna reflectors fold up for launch, then spring back into their original cupped circular shape on orbit. The new satellites will augment the TDRS system’s existing Sand Ku-band frequencies by adding Ka-band capability. TDRS will serve as the sole means of continuous, high-data-rate communication with the space shuttle, with the International Space Station upon its completion, and with dozens of unmanned scientific satellites in low earth orbit. The TDRS is scheduled to be launched from CCAFS June 29 aboard an Atlas IIA/Centaur rocket KSC-00pp0710

After its arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility, the crated Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS-H) is transported past the Vehicle Assembly Building (in the background) to the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2) for testing. The TDRS is one of three (labeled H, I and J) being built in the Hughes Space and Communications Company Integrated Satellite Factory in El Segundo, Calif. The latest TDRS uses an innovative springback antenna design. A pair of 15-foot-diameter, flexible mesh antenna reflectors fold up for launch, then spring back into their original cupped circular shape on orbit. The new satellites will augment the TDRS system’s existing Sand Ku-band frequencies by adding Ka-band capability. TDRS will serve as the sole means of continuous, high-data-rate communication with the space shuttle, with the International Space Station upon its completion, and with dozens of unmanned scientific satellites in low earth orbit. The TDRS is scheduled to be launched from CCAFS June 29 aboard an Atlas IIA/Centaur rocket KSC-00pp0709

After its arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility, the crated Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS-H) is transported past the Vehicle Assembly Building (in the background) to the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2) for testing. The TDRS is one of three (labeled H, I and J) being built in the Hughes Space and Communications Company Integrated Satellite Factory in El Segundo, Calif. The latest TDRS uses an innovative springback antenna design. A pair of 15-foot-diameter, flexible mesh antenna reflectors fold up for launch, then spring back into their original cupped circular shape on orbit. The new satellites will augment the TDRS system’s existing Sand Ku-band frequencies by adding Ka-band capability. TDRS will serve as the sole means of continuous, high-data-rate communication with the space shuttle, with the International Space Station upon its completion, and with dozens of unmanned scientific satellites in low earth orbit. The TDRS is scheduled to be launched from CCAFS June 29 aboard an Atlas IIA/Centaur rocket KSC00pp0709

At the Shuttle Landing Facility, the crated Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS-H) is offloaded from an air cargo plane. It will be taken to the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2) for testing. The TDRS is one of three (labeled H, I and J) being built in the Hughes Space and Communications Company Integrated Satellite Factory in El Segundo, Calif. The latest TDRS uses an innovative springback antenna design. A pair of 15-foot-diameter, flexible mesh antenna reflectors fold up for launch, then spring back into their original cupped circular shape on orbit. The new satellites will augment the TDRS system’s existing Sand Ku-band frequencies by adding Ka-band capability. TDRS will serve as the sole means of continuous, high-data-rate communication with the space shuttle, with the International Space Station upon its completion, and with dozens of unmanned scientific satellites in low earth orbit. The TDRS is scheduled to be launched from CCAFS June 29 aboard an Atlas IIA/Centaur rocket KSC-00pp0706

The crated Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS-H) is pulled inside the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2) after its arrival at KSC. The TDRS will undergo testing in the SAEF-2. One of three satellites (labeled H, I and J) being built in the Hughes Space and Communications Company Integrated Satellite Factory in El Segundo, Calif., the latest TDRS uses an innovative springback antenna design. A pair of 15-foot-diameter, flexible mesh antenna reflectors fold up for launch, then spring back into their original cupped circular shape on orbit. The new satellites will augment the TDRS system’s existing Sand Ku-band frequencies by adding Ka-band capability. TDRS will serve as the sole means of continuous, high-data-rate communication with the space shuttle, with the International Space Station upon its completion, and with dozens of unmanned scientific satellites in low earth orbit. The TDRS is scheduled to be launched from CCAFS June 29 aboard an Atlas IIA/Centaur rocket KSC00pp0711

JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, HOUSTON, TEXAS -- (ISS03-5-002) --EXPEDITION THREE CREW PORTRAIT -- Taking a break from a busy training schedule to pose for a portrait are the crew members for Expedition Three, scheduled to replace the current cosmonaut/astronaut trio aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Astronaut Frank L. Culbertson Jr. (center), commander, is flanked by cosmonauts Mikhail Tyurin (left) and Vladimir Dezhurov, both flight engineers representing Rosaviakosmos. The three will accompany the STS-105 crew into Earth orbit aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery this summer to begin their lengthy stay on the orbital outpost KSC-01pp1301

JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, HOUSTON, TEXAS -- (STS108-5-002)STS-108 CREW PORTRAIT -- These seven astronauts and three cosmonauts share the common denominators of the Space Shuttle Endeavour and the International Space Station (ISS). Standing at rear (from the left) are STS-108 crew members Daniel M. Tani and Linda M. Godwin, both mission specialists; Dominic L. Gorie and Mark E. Kelly, commander and pilot, respectively. Those four will spend approximately ten days in space in late November and early December aboard the Endeavour. In front, from the left, are Daniel W. Bursch, Yuri Onufrienko, Carl E. Walz, Mikhail Tyurin, Frank L. Culbertson and Vladimir N. Dezhurov. Culbertson, Expedition Three commander, as well as flight engineers Tyurin and Dezhurov, will use the Space Shuttle Discovery on STS-105 to reach the station for a lengthy stay and then return to Earth aboard Endeavour. They will be replaced aboard the orbital outpost by Onufrienko, Expedition Four commander, along with Bursch and Walz, both flight engineers. The Expedition Four crew will accompany the STS-108 crew into Earth orbit. Dezhurov, Tyurin and Onufrienko represent Rosaviakosmos KSC-01pp1646

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- After tower rollback, the Boeing Delta II rocket with NASA's Comet Nucleus Tour (CONTOUR) spacecraft attached is visible. The rocket exhibits several logos, including that of CONTOUR, Boeing and NASA. The launch is scheduled for 2:47 a.m. EDT July 3. Designed and built by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., the 2,138-pound (970-kilogram) spacecraft will be placed into an elliptical Earth orbit until Aug. 15, when it is scheduled to fire its main engine and enter a comet-chasing orbit around the sun. The mission's flexible four-year plan includes encounters with comets Encke (Nov. 12, 2003) and Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 (June 19, 2006), though it can add an encounter with a "new" and scientifically valuable comet from the outer solar system, should one be discovered in time for CONTOUR to fly past it. CONTOUR's four scientific instruments will take detailed pictures and measure the chemical makeup of each comet's nucleus -- a chunk of ice and rock -- while analyzing the surrounding gas and dust. KSC-02pd1119

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Boeing Delta II rocket with NASA's Comet Nucleus Tour (CONTOUR) spacecraft attached is becoming visible as the launch tower is prepared for rollback. The launch is scheduled for 2:47 a.m. EDT July 3 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. Designed and built by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., the 2,138-pound (970-kilogram) spacecraft will be placed into an elliptical Earth orbit until Aug. 15, when it is scheduled to fire its main engine and enter a comet-chasing orbit around the sun. The mission's flexible four-year plan includes encounters with comets Encke (Nov. 12, 2003) and Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 (June 19, 2006), though it can add an encounter with a "new" and scientifically valuable comet from the outer solar system, should one be discovered in time for CONTOUR to fly past it. CONTOUR's four scientific instruments will take detailed pictures and measure the chemical makeup of each comet's nucleus -- a chunk of ice and rock -- while analyzing the surrounding gas and dust. KSC-02pd1115

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Sunset-shaded clouds of purple and pink fill the sky as the launch tower on pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, rolls back to reveal the Boeing Delta II rocket with NASA's Comet Nucleus Tour (CONTOUR) spacecraft attached. The launch is scheduled for 2:47 a.m. EDT July 3. Designed and built by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., the 2,138-pound (970-kilogram) spacecraft will be placed into an elliptical Earth orbit until Aug. 15, when it is scheduled to fire its main engine and enter a comet-chasing orbit around the sun. The mission's flexible four-year plan includes encounters with comets Encke (Nov. 12, 2003) and Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 (June 19, 2006), though it can add an encounter with a "new" and scientifically valuable comet from the outer solar system, should one be discovered in time for CONTOUR to fly past it. CONTOUR's four scientific instruments will take detailed pictures and measure the chemical makeup of each comet's nucleus -- a chunk of ice and rock -- while analyzing the surrounding gas and dust. KSC-02pd1118

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The setting sun casts purple and pink shades in the sky as the launch tower on pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, rolls back to reveal the Boeing Delta II rocket with NASA's Comet Nucleus Tour (CONTOUR) spacecraft attached. The launch is scheduled for 2:47 a.m. EDT July 3. Designed and built by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., the 2,138-pound (970-kilogram) spacecraft will be placed into an elliptical Earth orbit until Aug. 15, when it is scheduled to fire its main engine and enter a comet-chasing orbit around the sun. The mission's flexible four-year plan includes encounters with comets Encke (Nov. 12, 2003) and Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 (June 19, 2006), though it can add an encounter with a "new" and scientifically valuable comet from the outer solar system, should one be discovered in time for CONTOUR to fly past it. CONTOUR's four scientific instruments will take detailed pictures and measure the chemical makeup of each comet's nucleus -- a chunk of ice and rock -- while analyzing the surrounding gas and dust. KSC-02pd1117

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Boeing Delta II rocket with NASA's Comet Nucleus Tour (CONTOUR) spacecraft attached is bathed in light as it sits on pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The launch is scheduled for 2:47 a.m. EDT July 3. Designed and built by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., the 2,138-pound (970-kilogram) spacecraft will be placed into an elliptical Earth orbit until Aug. 15, when it is scheduled to fire its main engine and enter a comet-chasing orbit around the sun. The mission's flexible four-year plan includes encounters with comets Encke (Nov. 12, 2003) and Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 (June 19, 2006), though it can add an encounter with a "new" and scientifically valuable comet from the outer solar system, should one be discovered in time for CONTOUR to fly past it. CONTOUR's four scientific instruments will take detailed pictures and measure the chemical makeup of each comet's nucleus -- a chunk of ice and rock -- while analyzing the surrounding gas and dust. KSC-02pd1120

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Boeing Delta II rocket with NASA's Comet Nucleus Tour (CONTOUR) spacecraft attached is visible as the launch tower is rolled back. The launch is scheduled for 2:47 a.m. EDT July 3 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. Designed and built by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., the 2,138-pound (970-kilogram) spacecraft will be placed into an elliptical Earth orbit until Aug. 15, when it is scheduled to fire its main engine and enter a comet-chasing orbit around the sun. The mission's flexible four-year plan includes encounters with comets Encke (Nov. 12, 2003) and Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 (June 19, 2006), though it can add an encounter with a "new" and scientifically valuable comet from the outer solar system, should one be discovered in time for CONTOUR to fly past it. CONTOUR's four scientific instruments will take detailed pictures and measure the chemical makeup of each comet's nucleus -- a chunk of ice and rock -- while analyzing the surrounding gas and dust. KSC-02pd1116

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The Boeing Delta II rocket carrying NASA's Comet Nucleus Tour (CONTOUR) spacecraft streaks across the night sky above pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The launch took place at 2:47:41 a.m. EDT July 3. Designed and built by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., the 2,138-pound (970-kilogram) spacecraft will be placed into an elliptical Earth orbit until Aug. 15, when it is scheduled to fire its main engine and enter a comet-chasing orbit around the sun. The mission's flexible four-year plan includes encounters with comets Encke (Nov. 12, 2003) and Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 (June 19, 2006), though it can add an encounter with a "new" and scientifically valuable comet from the outer solar system, should one be discovered in time for CONTOUR to fly past it. CONTOUR's four scientific instruments will take detailed pictures and measure the chemical makeup of each comet's nucleus -- a chunk of ice and rock -- while analyzing the surrounding gas and dust. KSC-02pp1124

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA's Comet Nucleus Tour (CONTOUR) spacecraft successfully launches at 2:47:41 a.m. EDT aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. Designed and built by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., the 2,138-pound (970-kilogram) spacecraft was placed into an elliptical Earth orbit 63 minutes after launch. About 19 minutes later the mission operations team at APL acquired a signal from the spacecraft through the Deep Space Network antenna station in Goldstone, Calif., and by 5:45 a.m. EDT Mission Director Dr. Robert W. Farquhar of the Applied Physics Lab confirmed the craft was operating normally and ready to carry out its early orbit maneuvers. CONTOUR will orbit Earth until Aug. 15, when it is scheduled to fire its main engine and enter a comet-chasing orbit around the sun. The mission's flexible four-year plan includes encounters with comets Encke (Nov. 12, 2003) and Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 (June 19, 2006), though it can add an encounter with a "new" and scientifically valuable comet from the outer solar system, should one be discovered in time for CONTOUR to fly past it. CONTOUR's four scientific instruments will take detailed pictures and measure the chemical makeup of each comet's nucleus -- a chunk of ice and rock -- while analyzing the surrounding gas and dust. KSC-02pp1125

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA's Comet Nucleus Tour (CONTOUR) spacecraft successfully launches at 2:47 a.m. EDT aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. Designed and built by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., the 2,138-pound (970-kilogram) spacecraft was placed into an elliptical Earth orbit 63 minutes after launch. About 19 minutes later the mission operations team at APL acquired a signal from the spacecraft through the Deep Space Network antenna station in Goldstone, Calif., and by 5:45 a.m. EDT Mission Director Dr. Robert W. Farquhar of the Applied Physics Lab confirmed the craft was operating normally and ready to carry out its early orbit maneuvers. CONTOUR will orbit Earth until Aug. 15, when it is scheduled to fire its main engine and enter a comet-chasing orbit around the sun. The mission's flexible four-year plan includes encounters with comets Encke (Nov. 12, 2003) and Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 (June 19, 2006), though it can add an encounter with a "new" and scientifically valuable comet from the outer solar system, should one be discovered in time for CONTOUR to fly past it. CONTOUR's four scientific instruments will take detailed pictures and measure the chemical makeup of each comet's nucleus -- a chunk of ice and rock -- while analyzing the surrounding gas and dust. KSC-02pd1121

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A third-quarter moon is the only visible element in the sky as NASA's Comet Nucleus Tour (CONTOUR) spacecraft successfully launches at 2:47 a.m. EDT aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. Designed and built by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., the 2,138-pound (970-kilogram) spacecraft was placed into an elliptical Earth orbit 63 minutes after launch. About 19 minutes later the mission operations team at APL acquired a signal from the spacecraft through the Deep Space Network antenna station in Goldstone, Calif., and by 5:45 a.m. EDT Mission Director Dr. Robert W. Farquhar of the Applied Physics Lab confirmed the craft was operating normally and ready to carry out its early orbit maneuvers. CONTOUR will orbit Earth until Aug. 15, when it is scheduled to fire its main engine and enter a comet-chasing orbit around the sun. The mission's flexible four-year plan includes encounters with comets Encke (Nov. 12, 2003) and Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 (June 19, 2006), though it can add an encounter with a "new" and scientifically valuable comet from the outer solar system, should one be discovered in time for CONTOUR to fly past it. CONTOUR's four scientific instruments will take detailed pictures and measure the chemical makeup of each comet's nucleus -- a chunk of ice and rock -- while analyzing the surrounding gas and dust. KSC-02pd1123

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA's Comet Nucleus Tour (CONTOUR) spacecraft successfully launches at 2:47 a.m. EDT aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. Designed and built by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., the 2,138-pound (970-kilogram) spacecraft was placed into an elliptical Earth orbit 63 minutes after launch. About 19 minutes later the mission operations team at APL acquired a signal from the spacecraft through the Deep Space Network antenna station in Goldstone, Calif., and by 5:45 a.m. EDT Mission Director Dr. Robert W. Farquhar of the Applied Physics Lab confirmed the craft was operating normally and ready to carry out its early orbit maneuvers. CONTOUR will orbit Earth until Aug. 15, when it is scheduled to fire its main engine and enter a comet-chasing orbit around the sun. The mission's flexible four-year plan includes encounters with comets Encke (Nov. 12, 2003) and Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 (June 19, 2006), though it can add an encounter with a "new" and scientifically valuable comet from the outer solar system, should one be discovered in time for CONTOUR to fly past it. CONTOUR's four scientific instruments will take detailed pictures and measure the chemical makeup of each comet's nucleus -- a chunk of ice and rock -- while analyzing the surrounding gas and dust. KSC-02pd1122

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA's Comet Nucleus Tour (CONTOUR) spacecraft successfully launches at 2:47:41 a.m. EDT aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. Designed and built by The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md., the 2,138-pound (970-kilogram) spacecraft was placed into an elliptical Earth orbit 63 minutes after launch. About 19 minutes later the mission operations team at APL acquired a signal from the spacecraft through the Deep Space Network antenna station in Goldstone, Calif., and by 5:45 a.m. EDT Mission Director Dr. Robert W. Farquhar of the Applied Physics Lab confirmed the craft was operating normally and ready to carry out its early orbit maneuvers. CONTOUR will orbit Earth until Aug. 15, when it is scheduled to fire its main engine and enter a comet-chasing orbit around the sun. The mission's flexible four-year plan includes encounters with comets Encke (Nov. 12, 2003) and Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 (June 19, 2006), though it can add an encounter with a "new" and scientifically valuable comet from the outer solar system, should one be discovered in time for CONTOUR to fly past it. CONTOUR's four scientific instruments will take detailed pictures and measure the chemical makeup of each comet's nucleus -- a chunk of ice and rock -- while analyzing the surrounding gas and dust. KSC-02pp1126

STS113-S-009 (23 November 2002) --- Against a black night sky, the Space Shuttle Endeavour heads toward Earth orbit and a scheduled link-up with the International Space Station (ISS). Liftoff from the Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39 occurred at 7:49:47 p.m. (EST), November 23, 2002. The launch is the 19th for Endeavour, and the 112th flight in the Shuttle program. Mission STS-113 is the 16th assembly flight to the International Space Station, carrying another structure for the Station, the P1 integrated truss. Crewmembers onboard were astronauts James D. Wetherbee, commander; Paul S. Lockhart, pilot, along with astronauts Michael E. Lopez-Alegria and John B. Herrington, both mission specialists. Also onboard were the Expedition 6 crewmembers--astronauts Kenneth D. Bowersox and Donald R. Pettit, along with cosmonaut Nikolai M. Budarin--who went on to replace Expedition 5 aboard the Station. sts113-s-009

STS113-S-011 (23 November 2002) --- Against a black night sky, the Space Shuttle Endeavour heads toward Earth orbit and a scheduled link-up with the International Space Station (ISS). Liftoff from the Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39 occurred at 7:49:47 p.m. (EST), November 23, 2002. The launch is the 19th for Endeavour, and the 112th flight in the Shuttle program. Mission STS-113 is the 16th assembly flight to the International Space Station, carrying another structure for the Station, the P1 integrated truss. Crewmembers onboard were astronauts James D. Wetherbee, commander; Paul S. Lockhart, pilot, along with astronauts Michael E. Lopez-Alegria and John B. Herrington, both mission specialists. Also onboard were the Expedition 6 crewmembers--astronauts Kenneth D. Bowersox and Donald R. Pettit, along with cosmonaut Nikolai M. Budarin--who went on to replace Expedition 5 aboard the Station. sts113-s-011

STS113-S-037 (23 November 2002) --- Against a black night sky, the Space Shuttle Endeavour heads toward Earth orbit and a scheduled link-up with the International Space Station (ISS). Liftoff from the Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39 occurred at 7:49:47 p.m. (EST), November 23, 2002. The launch is the 19th for Endeavour, and the 112th flight in the Shuttle program. Mission STS-113 is the 16th assembly flight to the International Space Station, carrying another structure for the Station, the P1 integrated truss. Crewmembers onboard were astronauts James D. Wetherbee, commander; Paul S. Lockhart, pilot, along with astronauts Michael E. Lopez-Alegria and John B. Herrington, both mission specialists. Also onboard were the Expedition 6 crewmembers--astronauts Kenneth D. Bowersox and Donald R. Pettit, along with cosmonaut Nikolai M. Budarin--who went on to replace Expedition 5 aboard the Station. sts113-s-037

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Another component of the Mars Exploration Rover-1 mission is moved into KSC's Multi-Payload Processing Facility. While at KSC, the rovers, aeroshells and landers will undergo a full mission simulation. All of these flight elements will then be integrated together. After spin balance testing, each spacecraft will be mated to a solid propellant upper stage booster that will propel the spacecraft out of Earth orbit. Approximately 10 days before launch they will be transported to the launch pad for mating with their respective Boeing Delta II rockets. The rovers will serve as robotic geologists to seek answers about the evolution of Mars, particularly for a history of water. The rovers will be identical to each other, but will land at different regions of Mars. Launch of the MER-1 is scheduled for May 30. MER-2 will follow June 25. KSC-03pd0541

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The cruise stage, aeroshell and lander for the Mars Exploration Rover-1 mission and the MER-2 rover arrive at KSC's Multi-Payload Processing Facility. The same flight hardware for the MER-2 rover arrived Jan. 27; however, the MER-2 rover is scheduled to arrive at KSC in March. While at KSC, each of the two rovers, the aeroshells and the landers will undergo a full mission simulation. All of these flight elements will then be integrated together. After spin balance testing, each spacecraft will be mated to a solid propellant upper stage booster that will propel the spacecraft out of Earth orbit. Approximately 10 days before launch they will be transported to the launch pad for mating with their respective Boeing Delta II rockets. The rovers will serve as robotic geologists to seek answers about the evolution of Mars, particularly for a history of water. The rovers will be identical to each other, but will land at different regions of Mars. Launch of the MER-1 is scheduled for May 30. MER-2 will follow June 25. KSC-03pd0537

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The aeroshell for the Mars Exploration Rover-1 mission is moved into KSC's Multi-Payload Processing Facility. While at KSC, the rovers, aeroshells and landers will undergo a full mission simulation. All of these flight elements will then be integrated together. After spin balance testing, each spacecraft will be mated to a solid propellant upper stage booster that will propel the spacecraft out of Earth orbit. Approximately 10 days before launch they will be transported to the launch pad for mating with their respective Boeing Delta II rockets. The rovers will serve as robotic geologists to seek answers about the evolution of Mars, particularly for a history of water. The rovers will be identical to each other, but will land at different regions of Mars. Launch of the MER-1 is scheduled for May 30. MER-2 will follow June 25. KSC-03pd0539

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Another component of the Mars Exploration Rover-1 mission is offloaded at KSC's Multi-Payload Processing Facility. While at KSC, the rovers, aeroshells and landers will undergo a full mission simulation. All of these flight elements will then be integrated together. After spin balance testing, each spacecraft will be mated to a solid propellant upper stage booster that will propel the spacecraft out of Earth orbit. Approximately 10 days before launch they will be transported to the launch pad for mating with their respective Boeing Delta II rockets. The rovers will serve as robotic geologists to seek answers about the evolution of Mars, particularly for a history of water. The rovers will be identical to each other, but will land at different regions of Mars. Launch of the MER-1 is scheduled for May 30. MER-2 will follow June 25. KSC-03pd0540

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The aeroshell for the Mars Exploration Rover-1 mission is offloaded at KSC's Multi-Payload Processing Facility. While at KSC, the rovers, aeroshells and landers will undergo a full mission simulation. All of these flight elements will then be integrated together. After spin balance testing, each spacecraft will be mated to a solid propellant upper stage booster that will propel the spacecraft out of Earth orbit. Approximately 10 days before launch they will be transported to the launch pad for mating with their respective Boeing Delta II rockets. The rovers will serve as robotic geologists to seek answers about the evolution of Mars, particularly for a history of water. The rovers will be identical to each other, but will land at different regions of Mars. Launch of the MER-1 is scheduled for May 30. MER-2 will follow June 25. KSC-03pd0538

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The cruise stage, aeroshell and lander for the Mars Exploration Rover-1 mission and the MER-2 rover arrive at KSC. The same flight hardware for the MER-2 rover arrived Jan. 27; however, the MER-2 rover is scheduled to arrive at KSC in March. While at KSC, each of the two rovers, the aeroshells and the landers will undergo a full mission simulation. All of these flight elements will then be integrated together. After spin balance testing, each spacecraft will be mated to a solid propellant upper stage booster that will propel the spacecraft out of Earth orbit. Approximately 10 days before launch they will be transported to the launch pad for mating with their respective Boeing Delta II rockets. The rovers will serve as robotic geologists to seek answers about the evolution of Mars, particularly for a history of water. The rovers will be identical to each other, but will land at different regions of Mars. Launch of the MER-1 is scheduled for May 30. MER-2 will follow June 25. KSC-03pd0536

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- With the shipping container lifted, the aeroshell and cruise stage of Mars Exploration Rover-1 are revealed in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility. The upper portion is the heat shield on the aeroshell. Each rover , aeroshell and lander will undergo a full mission simulation while at KSC. All flight elements will then be integrated. After spin balance testing, each spacecraft will be mated to a solid propellant upper stage booster that will propel it out of Earth orbit. The rovers will serve as robotic geologists to seek answers about the evolution of Mars, particularly for a history of water. The rovers will be identical to each other, but will land at different regions of Mars. Launch of the MER-1 is scheduled for May 30. MER-2 will follow June 25. KSC-03pd0593

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, the shipping container is lifted off the components of Mars Exploration Rover-1, the aershell and cruise stage. Each rover , aeroshell and lander will undergo a full mission simulation while at KSC. All flight elements will then be integrated. After spin balance testing, each spacecraft will be mated to a solid propellant upper stage booster that will propel it out of Earth orbit. The rovers will serve as robotic geologists to seek answers about the evolution of Mars, particularly for a history of water. The rovers will be identical to each other, but will land at different regions of Mars. Launch of the MER-1 is scheduled for May 30. MER-2 will follow June 25. KSC-03pd0592

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- A worker in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility examines the Mars Exploration Rover-2.The rover , aeroshell and lander will undergo a full mission simulation while at KSC. All flight elements will then be integrated. After spin balance testing, each spacecraft will be mated to a solid propellant upper stage booster that will propel it out of Earth orbit. The rovers will serve as robotic geologists to seek answers about the evolution of Mars, particularly for a history of water. The rovers will be identical to each other, but will land at different regions of Mars. Launch of the MER-1 is scheduled for May 30. MER-2 will follow June 25. KSC-03pd0598

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, elements of one of the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) come together. In the foreground is a lander. In the background are an aeroshell, with the heat shield on top, and cruise stage below. The two rovers, MER-1 and MER-2 , aeroshells and landers will undergo a full mission simulation while at KSC. All flight elements will then be integrated. After spin balance testing, each spacecraft will be mated to a solid propellant upper stage booster that will propel it out of Earth orbit. The rovers will serve as robotic geologists to seek answers about the evolution of Mars, particularly for a history of water. The rovers will be identical to each other, but will land at different regions of Mars. Launch of the MER-1 is scheduled for May 30. MER-2 will follow June 25. KSC-03pd0600