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Colbert, Marquis de Seignelay, Jean Baptiste

Illustrissimo viro Domino D. Joanni Baptistæ Colbert / Nanteuil ad vivum ping. et sculpebat cum priuii Regis.

Jean-Baptiste Colbert (1619–1683)

Jean-Baptiste Colbert

Portret van Jean-Baptiste Colbert

Jean-Baptiste Colbert

Jean-Baptiste Colbert

Colbert, Marquis de Seignelay, Jean Baptiste

Jean-Baptiste Colbert

Colbert Visiting the Gobelins

Jean-Baptiste Colbert

Colbert, Marquis de Seignelay, Jean Baptiste

Portret van Jean-Baptiste Colbert

Colbert, Marquis de Seignelay, Jean Baptiste

Jacques-Nicolas Colbert

Colbert, Marquis de Seignelay, Jean Baptiste

Colbert, Jean Baptiste

Colbert, Jean Baptiste

Colbert, Marquis de Seignelay, Jean Baptiste

Colbert, Marquis de Seignelay, Jean Baptiste

Colbert, Marquis de Seignelay, Jean Baptiste

Boiserie from the Hôtel Colbert de Villacerf

Portrait of Colbert

Boiserie from the Hôtel Colbert de Villacerf

Massena, André. To M. Colbert

Massena, André. To M. Colbert

Portret van Jean-Baptiste Colbert

Colbert, John R - State: [Blank] - Year: [Blank]

Colbert, Henry - State: [Blank] - Year: [Blank]

Colbert, Lemart - State: [Blank] - Year: 1861

Colbert, Edward - State: Virginia - Year: [Blank]

Colbert, R - State: [Blank] - Year: [Blank]

Colbert, Timothy - State: [Blank] - Year: [Blank]

Railroad dining rooms in the Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore railroad depot, Philadelphia ... Philadelphia. Colbert, Pr. 55 S. Fourth Street [1861].

Colbert, [Blank] - State: Louisiana - Year: 1865

Colbert, [Blank] - State: [Illegible] - Year: 1865

Colbert, Enoch - Age [Blank], Year: [Blank] - Sixth Infantry - West Virginia

Hôtel Colbert, Windows

Cocks and Hens, Hôtel Colbert

Hôtel Colbert, Windows

Map of Colbert County, Alabama /

Eliz. Colbert

Missouri, Kansas, and Texas Railway, Red River Station, Colbert

Colbert, D C - Age: [Blank], Year: [BLANK] - Mississippi Second Battalion, Infantry, A-P

Colbert, J A - Age: [Blank], Year: [BLANK] - Mississippi Fourth Infantry (State Troops) AND Fifth Infantry, A-C

Colbert, Daniel - Age: [Blank], Year: [BLANK] - Mississippi Second Battalion, Infantry, A-P

Colbert, J H - Age: [Blank], Year: [BLANK] - Mississippi Eighth-Infantry, Co-F

Colbert, James F - Age: [Blank], Year: [BLANK] - Mississippi Eighth-Infantry, Co-F

Panoramic view of Stroudsburg, PA., from Colbert's Hill

Miss Helen Colbert

1940 Census Enumeration District Maps - Alabama - Colbert County - Tuscumbia - ED 17-3, ED 17-4, ED 17-5, ED 17-6, ED 17-7

1940 Census Enumeration District Maps - Alabama - Colbert County - Sheffield - ED 17-27, ED 17-28, ED 17-29, ED 17-30, ED 17-31, ED 17-32

COLBERT, RICHARD G. MIDSHIPMAN. PORTRAIT

Cunningham Plantation, Cherokee vic., Colbert County, Alabama

Cunningham Plantation, Cherokee vic., Colbert County, Alabama

Cunningham Plantation, Cherokee vic., Colbert County, Alabama

Cunningham Plantation, Cherokee vic., Colbert County, Alabama

Cunningham Plantation, Cherokee vic., Colbert County, Alabama

Cunningham Plantation, Cherokee vic., Colbert County, Alabama

Cunningham Plantation, Cherokee vic., Colbert County, Alabama

Cunningham Plantation, Cherokee vic., Colbert County, Alabama

Cunningham Plantation, Cherokee vic., Colbert County, Alabama

Washington, D.C. Betty Jane Colbert, a worker at the Arcade butcher shop, dismembering a chicken

[New Cruiser for French Navy: "Colbert"]

Statues and sculpture over the door of the gallery of House chamber, U.S. Capitol. Jean Baptise Colbert medallion II

Statues and sculpture over the door of the gallery of House chamber, U.S. Capitol. Jean Baptise Colbert medallion I

A stern view of various French ships tied up at a pier. They are, left to right: the auxiliary survey and support ships MEUSE (A 607) and VAR (A 608) and the cruiser COLBERT (C 611)

US Army (USA) Captain (CPT) Jason Colbert, 1ST Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment (1-7 CAV), 5th Brigade Combat Team (BCT), 1ST Cavalry Division (CD), distributes programs before several ground-breaking ceremonies take place in the Al Rasheed district of Baghdad, Iraq (IRQ), during Operation IRAQI FREEDOM

U.S. Air Force MASTER SGT. Don Colbert, 16th Air Force, air traffic controller, Aviano Air Base, Italy, along with Polish counterparts, control airspace at Lask Polish Air Base, Poland, on Sept. 17, 2004.(U.S. Air Force PHOTO by TECH. SGT. Justin D. Pyle) (RELEASED)

Winfield, MO, June 21, 2008 -- Lance Mayfield hands out shaved ice to local resident Frances Colbert of Hawke Point who has come to the sandbag staging area to help with flood preparations. Jocelyn Augustino/FEMA

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a worker prepares to pack a component of the Combined Operational Load Bearing External Resistance Treadmill, or COLBERT, for launch to the International Space Station on the space shuttle Discovery STS-128 mission. The treadmill is named after comedian Stephen Colbert, the host of Comedy Central’s “The Colbert Report.” Colbert urged his viewers to suggest the name “Colbert” as the name for the station’s Node 3 module. Although his name did receive the most entries in an Internet polling contest, NASA chose the name “Tranquility” to honor the accomplishments of the Apollo 11 mission. COLBERT will be installed in Tranquility after the node arrives at the station next year. Launch of STS-128 is targeted for Aug. 6, 2009. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-2825

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a worker prepares to pack the Combined Operational Load Bearing External Resistance Treadmill, or COLBERT, for launch to the International Space Station on the space shuttle Discovery STS-128 mission. The treadmill is named after comedian Stephen Colbert, the host of Comedy Central’s “The Colbert Report.” Colbert urged his viewers to suggest the name “Colbert” as the name for the station’s Node 3 module. Although his name did receive the most entries in an Internet polling contest, NASA chose the name “Tranquility” to honor the accomplishments of the Apollo 11 mission. COLBERT will be installed in Tranquility after the node arrives at the station next year. Launch of STS-128 is targeted for Aug. 6, 2009. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-2824

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, preparations are under way to pack the Combined Operational Load Bearing External Resistance Treadmill, or COLBERT, for launch to the International Space Station on the space shuttle Discovery STS-128 mission. The treadmill is named after comedian Stephen Colbert, the host of Comedy Central’s “The Colbert Report.” Colbert urged his viewers to suggest the name “Colbert” as the name for the station’s Node 3 module. Although his name did receive the most entries in an Internet polling contest, NASA chose the name “Tranquility” to honor the accomplishments of the Apollo 11 mission. COLBERT will be installed in Tranquility after the node arrives at the station next year. Launch of STS-128 is targeted for Aug. 6, 2009. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-2826

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, preparations are under way to pack the Combined Operational Load Bearing External Resistance Treadmill, or COLBERT, for launch to the International Space Station on the space shuttle Discovery STS-128 mission. The treadmill is named after comedian Stephen Colbert, the host of Comedy Central’s “The Colbert Report.” Colbert urged his viewers to suggest the name “Colbert” as the name for the station’s Node 3 module. Although his name did receive the most entries in an Internet polling contest, NASA chose the name “Tranquility” to honor the accomplishments of the Apollo 11 mission. COLBERT will be installed in Tranquility after the node arrives at the station next year. Launch of STS-128 is targeted for Aug. 6, 2009. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-2828

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –– In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, preparations are under way to pack the Combined Operational Load Bearing External Resistance Treadmill, or COLBERT, for launch to the International Space Station on the space shuttle Discovery STS-128 mission. The treadmill is named after comedian Stephen Colbert, the host of Comedy Central’s “The Colbert Report.” Colbert urged his viewers to suggest the name “Colbert” as the name for the station’s Node 3 module. Although his name did receive the most entries in an Internet polling contest, NASA chose the name “Tranquility” to honor the accomplishments of the Apollo 11 mission. COLBERT will be installed in Tranquility after the node arrives at the station next year. Launch of STS-128 is targeted for Aug. 6, 2009. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller KSC-2009-2827

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Leonardo multi-purpose logistics module is being prepared for the STS-128 mission to the International Space Station aboard space shuttle Discovery. The module will carry among its science and storage racks the Combined Operational Load Bearing External Resistance Treadmill, or C.O.L.B.E.R.T. The treadmill is named after comedian Stephen Colbert, the host of Comedy Central’s “The Colbert Report.” Colbert urged his viewers to suggest the name “Colbert” as the name for the station’s Node 3 module. Although his name did receive the most entries in an Internet polling contest, NASA chose the name “Tranquility” to honor the accomplishments of the Apollo 11 mission. COLBERT will be installed in Tranquility after the node arrives at the station next year. Launch of STS-128 is targeted for Aug. 7, 2009. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-3794

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The C.O.L.B.E.R.T decal is placed on the Combined Operational Load Bearing External Resistance Treadmill. The treadmill shares space in the Leonardo multi-purpose logistics module in the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The module is part of the payload for the STS-128 mission to the International Space Station aboard space shuttle Discovery. The treadmill is named after comedian Stephen Colbert, the host of Comedy Central’s “The Colbert Report.” Colbert urged his viewers to suggest the name “Colbert” as the name for the station’s Node 3 module. Although his name did receive the most entries in an Internet polling contest, NASA chose the name “Tranquility” to honor the accomplishments of the Apollo 11 mission. COLBERT will be installed in Tranquility after the node arrives at the station next year. Launch of STS-128 is targeted for Aug. 7, 2009. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-3796

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – This decal will be placed on the Combined Operational Load Bearing External Resistance Treadmill, or C.O.L.B.E.R.T., that will be carried to the International Space Station aboard space shuttle Discovery on the STS-128 mission. The treadmill is in the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida and will be placed in the Leonardo multi-purpose logistics module with science and storage racks. The treadmill is named after comedian Stephen Colbert, the host of Comedy Central’s “The Colbert Report.” Colbert urged his viewers to suggest the name “Colbert” as the name for the station’s Node 3 module. Although his name did receive the most entries in an Internet polling contest, NASA chose the name “Tranquility” to honor the accomplishments of the Apollo 11 mission. COLBERT will be installed in Tranquility after the node arrives at the station next year. Launch of STS-128 is targeted for Aug. 7, 2009. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-3795

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The payload canister rolls to Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Inside is the payload for space shuttle Discovery and the STS-128 mission, the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo and the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure Carrier. Discovery's 13-day flight will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. Launch of Discovery on its STS-128 mission is targeted for August 25. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller. KSC-2009-4292

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The payload canister rolls toward Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Inside is the payload for space shuttle Discovery and the STS-128 mission, the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo and the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure Carrier. Discovery's 13-day flight will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. Launch of Discovery on its STS-128 mission is targeted for August 25. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller. KSC-2009-4293

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The payload canister is in place beneath the Rotating Service Structure's Payload Changeout Room on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Inside the canister is the payload for space shuttle Discovery and the STS-128 mission, the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo and the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure Carrier. Discovery's 13-day flight will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. Launch of Discovery on its STS-128 mission is targeted for August 25. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller. KSC-2009-4296

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The payload canister rolls onto Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Inside is the payload for space shuttle Discovery and the STS-128 mission, the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo and the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure Carrier. Discovery's 13-day flight will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. Launch of Discovery on its STS-128 mission is targeted for August 25. Photo credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller. KSC-2009-4294

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – On Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the payload canister is lifted up to the Payload Changeout Room in the rotating service structure. Umbilical lines that keep the payload in an environmentally controlled environment are still attached. Inside is the payload for space shuttle Discovery and the STS-128 mission, the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo and the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure Carrier. Discovery's 13-day flight will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. Launch of Discovery on its STS-128 mission is targeted for August 25. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-4354

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Space shuttle Discovery, installed on the mobile launcher platform atop the crawler-transporter, is poised to begin moving on the crawlerway at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to Launch Pad 39A. First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was at 2:07 a.m. EDT Aug. 4. Rollout was delayed approximately 2 hours due to lightning in the area. The 3.4-mile journey was slower than usual as technicians stopped several times to clear mud from the crawler's treads and bearings. Discovery's 13-day flight will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. Launch of Discovery on its STS-128 mission is targeted for late August. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2009-4398

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the crawler-transporter delivers space shuttle Discovery atop the mobile launcher platform onto Launch Pad 39A. Traveling from the Vehicle Assembly Building, the shuttle took nearly 12 hours on the journey as technicians stopped several times to clear mud from the crawler's treads and bearings caused by the waterlogged crawlerway. First motion out of the VAB was at 2:07 a.m. EDT Aug. 4. Rollout was delayed approximately 2 hours due to lightning in the area. In the background is the blue water of the Atlantic Ocean. At left is the White Room at the end of the orbiter access arm. When in place against shuttle, the White Room provides entry into the cockpit. Discovery's 13-day flight will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. Launch of Discovery on its STS-128 mission is targeted for late August. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-2009-4423

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the crawler-transporter delivers space shuttle Discovery atop the mobile launcher platform onto Launch Pad 39A. The shuttle nears the flame trench, which channels the flames and smoke exhaust of the shuttle's solid rocket boosters away from the space shuttle during liftoff. Traveling from the Vehicle Assembly Building, the shuttle took nearly 12 hours on the journey as technicians stopped several times to clear mud from the crawler's treads and bearings caused by the waterlogged crawlerway. First motion out of the VAB was at 2:07 a.m. EDT Aug. 4. Rollout was delayed approximately 2 hours due to lightning in the area. Discovery's 13-day flight will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. Launch of Discovery on its STS-128 mission is targeted for late August. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-2009-4422

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Workers in the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida wait patiently by the crawler-transporter for the decision to start rolling space shuttle Discovery to Launch Pad 39A. Rollout was delayed approximately 2 hours due to lightning in the area. First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was at 2:07 a.m. EDT Aug. 4. The 3.4-mile journey was slower than usual as technicians stopped several times to clear mud from the crawler's treads and bearings. Discovery's 13-day flight will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. Launch of Discovery on its STS-128 mission is targeted for late August. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2009-4397

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –Sitting on top of the mobile launcher platform and propelled by the crawler-transporter, space shuttle Discovery rolls onto Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida after a nearly 12-hour journey from the Vehicle Assembly Building. First motion out of the VAB was at 2:07 a.m. EDT Aug. 4. Rollout was delayed approximately 2 hours due to lightning in the area. The rollout was slower than usual as technicians stopped several times to clear mud from the crawler's treads and bearings caused by the waterlogged crawlerway. Discovery's 13-day flight will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. Launch of Discovery on its STS-128 mission is targeted for late August. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-2009-4420

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Space shuttle Discovery is silhouetted against the dawn sky as it rolls out to Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The 3.4-mile journey was slower than usual as technicians stopped several times to clear mud from the crawler's treads and bearings. The waterlogged crawlerway can be seen in the foreground. First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was at 2:07 a.m. EDT Aug. 4. Rollout was delayed approximately 2 hours due to lightning in the area. Discovery's 13-day flight will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. Launch of Discovery on its STS-128 mission is targeted for late August. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2009-4408

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Space shuttle Discovery, installed on the mobile launcher platform atop the crawler-transporter, moves out of the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to Launch Pad 39A. First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was at 2:07 a.m. EDT Aug. 4. Rollout was delayed approximately 2 hours due to lightning in the area. The 3.4-mile journey was slower than usual as technicians stopped several times to clear mud from the crawler's treads and bearings. Discovery's 13-day flight will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. Launch of Discovery on its STS-128 mission is targeted for late August. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2009-4399

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Sitting on top of the mobile launcher platform, space shuttle Discovery straddles the flame trench, which channels the flames and smoke exhaust of the shuttle's solid rocket boosters away from the space shuttle during liftoff, on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Traveling from the Vehicle Assembly Building, the shuttle took nearly 12 hours on the journey as technicians stopped several times to clear mud from the crawler's treads and bearings caused by the waterlogged crawlerway. First motion out of the VAB was at 2:07 a.m. EDT Aug. 4. Rollout was delayed approximately 2 hours due to lightning in the area. Discovery was secured, or "hard down" to Launch Pad 39A at 1:50 p.m. EDT. "Hard down" means that the mobile launcher platform, or MLP, is sitting on the pedestals on the pad, and the crawler has been jacked down, thus transferring the weight of the MLP from the crawler to the pad pedestals. Discovery's 13-day flight will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. Launch of Discovery on its STS-128 mission is targeted for late August. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-2009-4425

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Space shuttle Discovery is silhouetted against the dawn sky as it rolls out to Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was at 2:07 a.m. EDT Aug. 4. Rollout was delayed approximately 2 hours due to lightning in the area. The 3.4-mile journey was slower than usual as technicians stopped several times to clear mud from the crawler's treads and bearings caused by the waterlogged crawlerway. Discovery's 13-day flight will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. Launch of Discovery on its STS-128 mission is targeted for late August. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2009-4406

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –Sitting on top of the mobile launcher platform, space shuttle Discovery arrives on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Traveling from the Vehicle Assembly Building, the journey took nearly 12 hours as technicians stopped several times to clear mud from the crawler's treads and bearings caused by the waterlogged crawlerway. First motion out of the VAB was at 2:07 a.m. EDT Aug. 4. Rollout was delayed approximately 2 hours due to lightning in the area. Discovery's 13-day flight will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. Launch of Discovery on its STS-128 mission is targeted for late August. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-2009-4416

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Sitting on top of the mobile launcher platform, space shuttle Discovery arrives on top of Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Traveling from the Vehicle Assembly Building, the shuttle took nearly 12 hours on the journey as technicians stopped several times to clear mud from the crawler's treads and bearings caused by the waterlogged crawlerway. First motion out of the VAB was at 2:07 a.m. EDT Aug. 4. Rollout was delayed approximately 2 hours due to lightning in the area. In the foreground next to Discovery's main engines is one of the two tail masts, which provide several umbilical connections to the orbiter, including a liquid-oxygen line through one and a liquid-hydrogen line through another. Discovery's 13-day flight will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. Launch of Discovery on its STS-128 mission is targeted for late August. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-2009-4424

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Sitting on top of the mobile launcher platform, space shuttle Discovery arrives on top of Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Traveling from the Vehicle Assembly Building, the shuttle took nearly 12 hours on the journey as technicians stopped several times to clear mud from the crawler's treads and bearings caused by the waterlogged crawlerway. First motion out of the VAB was at 2:07 a.m. EDT Aug. 4. Rollout was delayed approximately 2 hours due to lightning in the area. Discovery's 13-day flight will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. Launch of Discovery on its STS-128 mission is targeted for late August. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-2009-4417

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. –At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, a worker checks the tread on the crawler-transporter as it carries space shuttle Endeavour to Launch Pad 39A. The 3.4-mile journey was slower than usual as technicians stopped several times to clear mud from the crawler's treads and bearings caused by the waterlogged crawlerway. First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was at 2:07 a.m. EDT Aug. 4. Rollout was delayed approximately 2 hours due to lightning in the area. Discovery's 13-day flight will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. Launch of Discovery on its STS-128 mission is targeted for late August. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2009-4412

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Space shuttle Discovery, installed on the mobile launcher platform atop the crawler-transporter, moves along the crawlerway at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida as it rolls out to Launch Pad 39A. First motion out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was at 2:07 a.m. EDT Aug. 4. Rollout was delayed approximately 2 hours due to lightning in the area. The 3.4-mile journey was slower than usual as technicians stopped several times to clear mud from the crawler's treads and bearings. Discovery's 13-day flight will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. Launch of Discovery on its STS-128 mission is targeted for late August. Photo credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis KSC-2009-4402

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A closeup of space shuttle Endeavour after its arrival on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Traveling from the Vehicle Assembly Building, the shuttle took nearly 12 hours on the journey as technicians stopped several times to clear mud from the crawler's treads and bearings caused by the waterlogged crawlerway. First motion out of the VAB was at 2:07 a.m. EDT Aug. 4. Rollout was delayed approximately 2 hours due to lightning in the area. Discovery's 13-day flight will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. Launch of Discovery on its STS-128 mission is targeted for late August. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-2009-4419

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the crawler-transporter delivers space shuttle Discovery atop the mobile launcher platform onto Launch Pad 39A. The shuttle spans the flame trench, which channels the flames and smoke exhaust of the shuttle's solid rocket boosters away from the space shuttle during liftoff. Traveling from the Vehicle Assembly Building, the shuttle took nearly 12 hours on the journey as technicians stopped several times to clear mud from the crawler's treads and bearings caused by the waterlogged crawlerway. First motion out of the VAB was at 2:07 a.m. EDT Aug. 4. Rollout was delayed approximately 2 hours due to lightning in the area. Discovery's 13-day flight will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. Launch of Discovery on its STS-128 mission is targeted for late August. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder KSC-2009-4418

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Space shuttle Discovery's STS-128 mission crew members arrive in T-38 training jets at NASA Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility. Seen here are Commander Rick Sturckow and Mission Specialist Patrick Forrester. The astronauts will be taking part in terminal countdown demonstration test activities that include equipment familiarization and emergency egress training, and will culminate in a simulated launch countdown aboard Discovery. The mission will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. Launch of Discovery is targeted for late August. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-4453