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Checkout at Grocery Store

Dilbert's Big Ben, Brentwood, Long Island, New York. General view from manager's office over checkout desks

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- This aerial of view from 1963 shows the site of the Industrial Area for the Merritt Island Launch Annex, now the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Located five miles south of Launch Complex 39, this is the site where facilities were built such as the Headquarters Building, Operations and Checkout Building as well as the Central Instrumentation Facility. Photo Credit: NASA KSC--LOC-63-8506

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- This aerial of view from 1963 shows the site of the Industrial Area for the Merritt Island Launch Annex, now the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Located five miles south of Launch Complex 39, this is the site where facilities were built such as the Headquarters Building, Operations and Checkout Building as well as the Central Instrumentation Facility. Photo Credit: NASA KSC---LOC-63-8506

APOLLO/SATURN (A/S)- 500-F - LAUNCH COMPLEX (L/C)-39A - CHECKOUT - MERRITT ISLAND - CAPE

GEMINI-TITAN (GT)-11 - PREFLIGHT PREP - CHECKOUT - CAPE

Apollo 12 prime crew during spacecraft checkout at Rockwell Downey

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – A lunar module processed inside the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Photo credit: NASA KSC-69P-0953

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Apollo 15 crew walks out of the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center before climbing into the Astrovan for the ride out to the launch pad for their flight to the moon. Photo credit: NASA KSC-71PC-569

AS17-162-24056 - Apollo 17 - Apollo 17, Interior of the Lunar Module during checkout

"Parasol", sunshade for Skylab 1, receives checkout in bldg 10

Apollo spacecraft for ASTP during prelaunch checkout

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, structural work is ongoing inside the high bay of the Operations and Checkout Building. The modifications are taking place to configure the facility flight hardware from the Apollo Program and prepare to support payload processing for future space shuttle missions. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-378-0107

A view of damages on the orbiter maintenance checkout facility cable tunnel, part of Space Launch Complex 6 (SLC-6), under construction

A view, looking southeast, of the orbiter maintenance checkout facility cable tunnel, part of Space Launch Complex 6 (SLC-6), under construction

A view of the payload preparation room checkout cell no. 1, platforms 1 and 2, during construction of Space Launch Complex 6 (SLC-6)

An aerial view of the Operations and Checkout Building

An aerial view of the Contractor Operations Building, the Central Instrumentation Building, the Facility and Headquarters Building and the Operations and Checkout Building

41-D crew leaves operations and checkout building at KSC

STS 41-G crew prepares to leave Operations and checkout bldg for launch

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- Enterprise inside the Orbiter Maintenance and Checkout Facility at Vandenberg AFB, California. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-85PC-178

Enterprise inside the Orbiter Maintenance and Checkout Facility

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- Enterprise inside the Orbiter Maintenance and Checkout Facility at Vandenberg AFB, California. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-85PC-177

STS 51-D crewmembers depart KSC's operations and checkout building

STS 51-G crewmembers depart KSC's operations and checkout building

STS 51-F crewmembers depart KSC's operations and checkout building

STS 61-A crew leave operations & checkout facility for launch pad

Documentary view of the Magellan spacecraft, during Checkout, and an art

STS-29 crewmembers leave KSC Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building

STS-31 pre-deployment checkout of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) on OV-103

STS-31 pre-deployment checkout of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) on OV-103

STS-31 pre-deployment checkout of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) on OV-103

Hubble Space Telescope (HST) grappled by OV-103's RMS during STS-31 checkout

After traveling more than 1.5 billion km (948 million mi.), the Magellan spacecraft was inserted into orbit around Venus on Aug. 10, 1990. This mosaic consists of adjacent pieces of two magellan image strips obtained in the first radar test. The radar test was part of a planned In-Orbit Checkout sequence designed to prepare the magellan spacecraft and radar to begin mapping after Aug. 31. The strip on the left was returned to the Goldstone Deep Space Network station in California; the strip to the right was received at the DSN in Canberra, Australia. A third station that will be receiving Magellan data is locaterd near Madrid, Spain. Each image strip is 20 km (12 mi.) wide and 16,000 km (10,000 mi.) long. This mosaic is a small portion 80 km (50 mi.) long. This image is centered at 21 degrees north latitude and 286.8 degrees east longitude, southeast of a volcanic highland region called Beta Regio. The resolution of the image is about 120 meters (400 feet), 10 times better than revious images of the same area of Venus, revealing many new geologic features. The bright line trending northwest-southeast across the center of the image is a fracture or fault zone cutting the volcanic plains. In the upper lest corner of the image, a multiple-ring circular feature of probable volcanic origin can be seen, approx. 4.27 km (2.65 mi.) across. The bright and dark variations seen in the plains surrounding these features correspond to volcanic lava flows of varying ages. The volcanic lava flows in the southern half of the image have been cut by north-south trending faults. This area is similar geologically to volcanic deposits seen on Earth at Hawaii and the Snake River Plains in Idaho. ARC-1990-A90-3000

After traveling more than 1.5 billion km (948 million mi.), the Magellan spacecraft was inserted into orbit around Venus on Aug. 10, 1990.  This mosaic consists of adjacent pieces of two magellan image strips obtained in the first radar test.  The radar test was part of a planned In-Orbit Checkout sequence designed to prepare the magellan spacecraft and radar to begin mapping after Aug. 31.  The strip on the left was returned to the Goldstone Deep Space Network station in California; the strip to the right was received at the DSN in Canberra, Australia.  A third station that will be receiving Magellan data is locaterd near Madrid, Spain.  Each image strip is 20 km (12 mi.) wide and 16,000 km (10,000 mi.) long.  This mosaic is a small portion 80 km (50 mi.) long.  This image is centered at 21 degrees north latitude and 286.8 degrees east longitude, southeast of a volcanic highland region called Beta Regio.  The resolution of the image is about 120 meters (400 feet), 10 times better than revious images of the same area of Venus, revealing many new geologic features.  The bright line trending northwest-southeast across the center of the image is a fracture or fault zone cutting the volcanic plains.  In the upper lest corner of the image, a multiple-ring circular feature of probable volcanic origin can be seen,  approx. 4.27 km (2.65 mi.) across.  The bright and dark variations seen in the plains surrounding these features correspond to volcanic lava flows of varying ages.  The volcanic lava flows in the southern half of the image have been cut by north-south trending faults.  This area is similar geologically to volcanic deposits seen on Earth at Hawaii and the Snake River Plains in Idaho. ARC-1990-A90-3000
After traveling more than 1.5 billion km (948 million mi.), the Magellan spacecraft was inserted into orbit around Venus on Aug. 10, 1990. This mosaic consists of adjacent pieces of two magellan image strips obtained in the first radar test. The radar test was part of a planned In-Orbit Checkout sequence designed to prepare the magellan spacecraft and radar to begin mapping after Aug. 31. The strip on the left was returned to the Goldstone Deep Space Network station in California; the strip to the right was received at the DSN in Canberra, Australia. A third station that will be receiving Magellan data is locaterd near Madrid, Spain. Each image strip is 20 km (12 mi.) wide and 16,000 km (10,000 mi.) long. This mosaic is a small portion 80 km (50 mi.) long. This image is centered at 21 degrees north latitude and 286.8 degrees east longitude, southeast of a volcanic highland region called Beta Regio. The resolution of the image is about 120 meters (400 feet), 10 times better than revious images of the same area of Venus, revealing many new geologic features. The bright line trending northwest-southeast across the center of the image is a fracture or fault zone cutting the volcanic plains. In the upper lest corner of the image, a multiple-ring circular feature of probable volcanic origin can be seen, approx. 4.27 km (2.65 mi.) across. The bright and dark variations seen in the plains surrounding these features correspond to volcanic lava flows of varying ages. The volcanic lava flows in the southern half of the image have been cut by north-south trending faults. This area is similar geologically to volcanic deposits seen on Earth at Hawaii and the Snake River Plains in Idaho. ARC-1990-A90-3000

Joe Izano places a component in a vacuum bell jar in the clean room of the Payload Checkout Facility at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL)

John Gerczynski, left, and Bill Braun stand in the doorway of a large vacuum chamber in the Naval Research Laboratory's (NRL's) Payload Checkout Facility to prepare the gyrodynamics motion simulator for fuel slosh tests

Two researchers review some data while standing in front of a 16-foot thermal vacuum chamber in the Payload Checkout Facility at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). Inside the chamber is a gyrodynamics motion simulator used for large-scale fuel slosh tests

Fred Domer makes an adjustment to the position of a unit before it is tested in an anechoic chamber in the Payload Checkout Facility at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL)

Delores Kepron, a contractor working at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), prepares an actuator for testing in a thermal vacuum chamber in the NRL's Payload Checkout Facility

GREENBELT, Md. -- At NASA’s Goddard space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., a fully integrated Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer EUVE is seen in a clean room. EUVE will map the entire sky to determine the existence, direction, brightness and temperature of numerous objects that are sources of extreme ultraviolet radiation. Goddard is responsible for the design, construction, integration, checkout and operation of the spacecraft which is scheduled to launch May 28, 1992 from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla., aboard a Delta II rocket. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-92PC-0371

STS058-204-014 - STS-058 - SPACELAB crewmember doing pre exercise checkout of the expelled gas analyzer.

Cosmonauts Solovyev and Budarin conduct checkout of communications systems

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- At Hangar AO at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, payload processing technicians begin prelaunch checkout work of NASA’s X-Ray Timing Explorer XTE as it rests on a payload support structure after its arrival from the agency’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland. The spacecraft is scheduled to lift off from Launch Complex 17 at the Cape on a Delta II rocket on Aug. 31, 1995. After launch, the XTE will gather data on X-ray sources in our galaxy and the universe. Photo Credit: NASA KSC-95PC-1195

STS080-315-002 - STS-080 - EMU suit checkout conducted in middeck

STS076-323-024 - STS-076 - Checkout procedures of the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) unit

STS072-337-016 - STS-072 - FCS checkout and RCS hotfire procedures

STS076-323-028 - STS-076 - Checkout procedures of the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) unit

STS076-323-023 - STS-076 - Checkout procedures of the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) unit

STS076-323-027 - STS-076 - Checkout procedures of the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) unit

STS072-337-015 - STS-072 - FCS checkout and RCS hotfire procedures

STS072-337-019 - STS-072 - FCS checkout and RCS hotfire procedures

STS076-323-014 - STS-076 - Checkout procedures of the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) unit

STS076-323-018 - STS-076 - Checkout procedures of the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) unit

STS076-323-019 - STS-076 - Checkout procedures of the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) unit

STS076-323-021 - STS-076 - Checkout procedures of the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) unit

STS080-315-005 - STS-080 - EMU suit checkout conducted in middeck

STS076-323-020 - STS-076 - Checkout procedures of the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) unit

STS076-323-025 - STS-076 - Checkout procedures of the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) unit

STS080-315-004 - STS-080 - EMU suit checkout conducted in middeck

STS076-323-026 - STS-076 - Checkout procedures of the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) unit

STS080-315-003 - STS-080 - EMU suit checkout conducted in middeck

STS076-323-016 - STS-076 - Checkout procedures of the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) unit

STS076-323-022 - STS-076 - Checkout procedures of the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) unit

STS076-323-015 - STS-076 - Checkout procedures of the Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) unit

STS080-315-001 - STS-080 - EMU suit checkout conducted in middeck

STS072-337-018 - STS-072 - FCS checkout and RCS hotfire procedures

STS072-337-017 - STS-072 - FCS checkout and RCS hotfire procedures

S87E5004 - STS-087 - USMP MGBX checkout conducted by Doi

S82E5016 - STS-082 - Checkout activity on the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm

S82E5014 - STS-082 - View of the shuttle orbiter Discovery's payload bay during RMS checkout

STS087-319-030 - STS-087 - Doi changes out a light bulb on his EMU helmet during EMU checkout

STS087-319-004 - STS-087 - Scott, Doi and Lindsey conduct EMU checkout in the airlock

STS082-343-009 - STS-082 - EMU checkout and preparations in the shuttle middeck

S87E5032 - STS-087 - Scott conducts EMU checkout activity in the middeck

STS082-343-007 - STS-082 - EMU checkout and preparations in the shuttle middeck

STS087-319-013 - STS-087 - Scott, Doi and Lindsey conduct EMU checkout in the airlock

S87E5030 - STS-087 - Doi conducts EMU checkout activity in the middeck

S87E5033 - STS-087 - Doi conducts EMU checkout activity in the middeck

STS082-343-010 - STS-082 - EMU checkout and preparations in the shuttle middeck

S82E5015 - STS-082 - Checkout activity on the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm

S82E5012 - STS-082 - View of the shuttle orbiter Discovery's payload bay during RMS checkout

STS087-319-031 - STS-087 - Doi changes out a light bulb on his EMU helmet during EMU checkout

S82E5010 - STS-082 - View of the shuttle orbiter Discovery's payload bay during RMS checkout

S87E5031 - STS-087 - Doi conducts EMU checkout activity in the middeck

S87E5003 - STS-087 - USMP MGBX checkout conducted by Doi

STS087-319-005 - STS-087 - Scott, Doi and Lindsey conduct EMU checkout in the airlock

STS082-343-001 - STS-082 - EMU checkout and preparations in the shuttle middeck

STS082-343-006 - STS-082 - EMU checkout and preparations in the shuttle middeck

STS082-343-002 - STS-082 - EMU checkout and preparations in the shuttle middeck

S87E5002 - STS-087 - USMP MGBX checkout conducted by Chawla

STS087-319-006 - STS-087 - Scott, Doi and Lindsey conduct EMU checkout in the airlock

STS087-319-012 - STS-087 - Scott, Doi and Lindsey conduct EMU checkout in the airlock

STS087-319-008 - STS-087 - Scott, Doi and Lindsey conduct EMU checkout in the airlock

STS087-319-003 - STS-087 - Scott, Doi and Lindsey conduct EMU checkout in the airlock

S82E5013 - STS-082 - View of the shuttle orbiter Discovery's payload bay during RMS checkout

STS085-330-034 - STS-085 - Brown, Rominger and Curbeam conduct flight control systems checkout

STS082-343-008 - STS-082 - EMU checkout and preparations in the shuttle middeck

S82E5011 - STS-082 - View of the shuttle orbiter Discovery's payload bay during RMS checkout

STS082-343-004 - STS-082 - EMU checkout and preparations in the shuttle middeck

STS087-319-014 - STS-087 - Scott, Doi and Lindsey conduct EMU checkout in the airlock