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On U.S. submarine chaser

On U.S. submarine chaser

Scene at the American submarine chaser headquaters in the Mediterranean

Scene at the American submarine chaser headquaters in the Mediterranean

Scene aboard submarine chaser at Eqrs. Submarine Chaser Depot in the Mediterranean

Scene aboard submarine chaser at Eqrs. Submarine Chaser Depot in the Mediterranean

Scene aboard U.S. Submarine Chaser

Scene aboard U.S. Submarine Chaser

Scene aboard an American submarine chaser in the Mediterranean

Scene aboard an American submarine chaser in the Mediterranean

Scene at the American submarine chaser depot in the Mediterranean

Scene at the American submarine chaser depot in the Mediterranean

Scene at the American submarine chaser headquaters in the Mediterranean

Scene at the American submarine chaser headquaters in the Mediterranean

American submarine chaser depot

American submarine chaser depot

View at U.S. Submarine Chaser Depot in the Mediterranean

View at U.S. Submarine Chaser Depot in the Mediterranean

Colleges and Universities - Columbia University - Submarine Chaser Training School - Naval Engineers' Submarine Chaser Training School, Columbia University, New York. Ignition tests

Colleges and Universities - Columbia University - Submarine Chaser Training School - Naval Engineers' Submarine Chaser Training School, Columbia University, New York.  Ignition tests

Colleges and Universities - Columbia University - Submarine Chaser Training School - Naval Engineers' Submarine Chaser Training School, Columbia University, New York. Assembling auxiliary motor

Colleges and Universities - Columbia University - Submarine Chaser Training School - Naval Engineers' Submarine Chaser Training School, Columbia University, New York.  Assembling auxiliary motor

Ceremonies - Michigan thru New Jersey - Submarine Chaser Float in the second Red Cross War Fund Campaign Parade, May 1918, which served double purpose of stimulating Navy enlistments and Red Cross subscriptions. St. Paul, Minn

Ceremonies - Michigan thru New Jersey - Submarine Chaser Float in the second Red Cross War Fund Campaign Parade, May 1918, which served double purpose of stimulating Navy enlistments and Red Cross subscriptions. St. Paul, Minn

Colleges and Universities - Columbia University - Submarine Chaser Training School - Naval Engineers' Submarine Chaser Training School, Columbia University, New York. Taking indication from gas engine

Colleges and Universities - Columbia University - Submarine Chaser Training School - Naval Engineers' Submarine Chaser Training School, Columbia University, New York.  Taking indication from gas engine

Colleges and Universities - Columbia University - Submarine Chaser Training School - Naval Engineers' Submarine Chaser Training School, Columbia University, New York. Lecture room

Colleges and Universities - Columbia University - Submarine Chaser Training School - Naval Engineers' Submarine Chaser Training School, Columbia University, New York.  Lecture room

Colleges and Universities - Columbia University - Submarine Chaser Training School - Naval Engineers' Submarine Chaser Training School, Columbia University, New York. Instruction on engine

Colleges and Universities - Columbia University - Submarine Chaser Training School - Naval Engineers' Submarine Chaser Training School, Columbia University, New York.  Instruction on engine

Colleges and Universities - Columbia University - Submarine Chaser Training School - Naval Engineers' Submarine Chaser Training School, Columbia University, New York. View of instructing officers and engine used in teaching the engineers

Colleges and Universities - Columbia University - Submarine Chaser Training School - Naval Engineers' Submarine Chaser Training School, Columbia University, New York.  View of instructing officers and engine used in teaching the engineers

Colleges and Universities - Columbia University - Submarine Chaser Training School - Naval Engineers' Submarine Chaser Training School, Columbia University, New York. Signaling from bridge

Colleges and Universities - Columbia University - Submarine Chaser Training School - Naval Engineers' Submarine Chaser Training School, Columbia University, New York.  Signaling from bridge

Colleges and Universities - Columbia University - Submarine Chaser Training School - Naval Engineers' Submarine Chaser Training School, Columbia University, New York. Engine lathe work

Colleges and Universities - Columbia University - Submarine Chaser Training School - Naval Engineers' Submarine Chaser Training School, Columbia University, New York.  Engine lathe work

Colleges and Universities - Columbia University - Submarine Chaser Training School - Naval Engineers' Submarine Chaser Training School, Columbia University, New York. Assembling main engine

Colleges and Universities - Columbia University - Submarine Chaser Training School - Naval Engineers' Submarine Chaser Training School, Columbia University, New York.  Assembling main engine

Colleges and Universities - Columbia University - Submarine Chaser Training School - Naval Engineers' Submarine Chaser Training School, Columbia University, New York. Measuring engine power by electricity

Colleges and Universities - Columbia University - Submarine Chaser Training School - Naval Engineers' Submarine Chaser Training School, Columbia University, New York.  Measuring engine power by electricity

Colleges and Universities - Columbia University - Submarine Chaser Training School - Naval Engineers' Submarine Chaser Training School, Columbia University, New York. Construction work

Colleges and Universities - Columbia University - Submarine Chaser Training School - Naval Engineers' Submarine Chaser Training School, Columbia University, New York.  Construction work

Colleges and Universities - Columbia University - Submarine Chaser Training School - Naval Engineers' Submarine Chaser Training School, Columbia University, New York. Sailors listening to a lecture

Colleges and Universities - Columbia University - Submarine Chaser Training School - Naval Engineers' Submarine Chaser Training School, Columbia University, New York.  Sailors listening to a lecture

A port beam view of the missile patrol chaser PCG-612 underway following completion. The vessel was built by Tacoma Boatbuilding Company for sale to the Saudi Arabian navy

A port beam view of the missile patrol chaser PCG-612 underway following completion. The vessel was built by Tacoma Boatbuilding Company for sale to the Saudi Arabian navy

A port beam view of a patrol chaser, missile No. 618 at 70 percent completion

A port beam view of a patrol chaser, missile No. 618 at 70 percent completion

A view of the pilot house, starboard looking port, aboard the PCG-612 class patrol chaser, missile, hull no. 616 at 90 percent completion

A view of the pilot house, starboard looking port, aboard the PCG-612 class patrol chaser, missile, hull no. 616 at 90 percent completion

A view of a machinery room, starboard aft looking forward, aboard the PCG-612 class patrol chaser, missile, hull no. 616 at 90 percent completion

A view of a machinery room, starboard aft looking forward, aboard the PCG-612 class patrol chaser, missile, hull no. 616 at 90 percent completion

A view of the auxiliary machinery Room No. 2, looking forward, aboard the PCG-612 class patrol chaser, missile, hull no. 616 at 90 percent completion

A view of the auxiliary machinery Room No. 2, looking forward, aboard the PCG-612 class patrol chaser, missile, hull no. 616 at 90 percent completion

A view of the forward port draft marks on the hull of the PCG-612 class patrol chaser, missile, hull number 616 during inclining experiments

A view of the forward port draft marks on the hull of the PCG-612 class patrol chaser, missile, hull number 616 during inclining experiments

A view of the midship port draft marks on the hull of the PCG-612 class patrol chaser, missile, hull number 616 during inclining experiments

A view of the midship port draft marks on the hull of the PCG-612 class patrol chaser, missile, hull number 616 during inclining experiments

A view of the forward starboard draft marks on the hull of the PCG-612 class patrol chaser, missile, hull number 616 during inclining experiments

A view of the forward starboard draft marks on the hull of the PCG-612 class patrol chaser, missile, hull number 616 during inclining experiments

A view of the aft starboard draft marks on the hull of the PCG-612 class patrol chaser, missile, hull number 616 during inclining experiments

A view of the aft starboard draft marks on the hull of the PCG-612 class patrol chaser, missile, hull number 616 during inclining experiments

A view of the midship starboard draft marks on the hull of the PCG-612 class patrol chaser, missile, hull number 616 during inclining experiments

A view of the midship starboard draft marks on the hull of the PCG-612 class patrol chaser, missile, hull number 616 during inclining experiments

Historical Navy submarine with shadow of P-3 (sub chaser Orion in overlight ARC-1969-A96-0024

Historical Navy submarine with shadow of P-3 (sub chaser Orion in overlight ARC-1969-A96-0024

His Majesty King Harald V (center), King Norway, answers reporters questions at the conclusion the re-enactment the 1942 ceremony when the United States transferred the US Navy (USN) PC-461 Patrol Craft Class Submarine Chaser USS PC-467 to the Royal Norwegian Navy, later renamed the KING HAAKON (P390), while (left to right) USN Admiral Michael G. Mullen, CHIEF Naval Operations (CNO); the Honorable Dionel M. Aviles, Under Secretary the Navy (USECNAV); and USN Rear Admiral (RDML) Jan C. Guadio, 84th Commandant Naval District Washington (NDW); are seen standing in the background. His Majesty King Harald V is on an ficial visit to the United States celebrating 100 years...

His Majesty King Harald V (center), King Norway, answers reporters questions at the conclusion the re-enactment the 1942 ceremony when the United States transferred the US Navy (USN) PC-461 Patrol Craft Class Submarine Chaser USS PC-467 to the Royal Norwegian Navy, later renamed the KING HAAKON (P390), while (left to right) USN Admiral Michael G. Mullen, CHIEF Naval Operations (CNO); the Honorable Dionel M. Aviles, Under Secretary the Navy (USECNAV); and USN Rear Admiral (RDML) Jan C. Guadio, 84th Commandant Naval District Washington (NDW); are seen standing in the background. His Majesty King Harald V is on an ficial visit to the United States celebrating 100 years...

POWAY, Calif. – During NASA's Commercial Crew Development Round 1 CCDev1 activities, the rocket motor under development by Sierra Nevada Corp. for its Dream Chaser spacecraft successfully fires at the company's rocket test facility located near San Diego. NASA team members reviewed the motor's system and then watched it fire three times in one day, including one firing under vacuum ignition conditions. The tests, which simulated a complete nominal mission profile, demonstrated the multiple restart capability of Sierra Nevada's hybrid rocket. Two of the company's designed and developed hybrid rocket motors will be used as the main propulsion system on the Dream Chaser after launching aboard an Atlas V rocket. Dream Chaser is one of five systems NASA invested in during CCDev1 in order to aid in the innovation and development of American-led commercial capabilities for crew transportation and rescue services to and from the International Space Station and other low Earth orbit destinations. In 2011, NASA's Commercial Crew Program CCP entered into another funded Space Act Agreement with Sierra Nevada for the second round of commercial crew development CCDev2) so the company could further develop its Dream Chaser spacecraft for NASA transportation services. For information about CCP, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Photo credit: Sierra Nevada Corp. KSC-2012-1013

POWAY, Calif. – During NASA's Commercial Crew Development Round 1 CCDev1 activities, the rocket motor under development by Sierra Nevada Corp. for its Dream Chaser spacecraft successfully fires at the company's rocket test facility located near San Diego. NASA team members reviewed the motor's system and then watched it fire three times in one day, including one firing under vacuum ignition conditions. The tests, which simulated a complete nominal mission profile, demonstrated the multiple restart capability of Sierra Nevada's hybrid rocket. Two of the company's designed and developed hybrid rocket motors will be used as the main propulsion system on the Dream Chaser after launching aboard an Atlas V rocket. Dream Chaser is one of five systems NASA invested in during CCDev1 in order to aid in the innovation and development of American-led commercial capabilities for crew transportation and rescue services to and from the International Space Station and other low Earth orbit destinations. In 2011, NASA's Commercial Crew Program CCP entered into another funded Space Act Agreement with Sierra Nevada for the second round of commercial crew development CCDev2) so the company could further develop its Dream Chaser spacecraft for NASA transportation services. For information about CCP, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Photo credit: Sierra Nevada Corp. KSC-2012-1013

BOULDER, Colo. – A Sierra Nevada Corp. team member examines the company's structural test article for the Dream Chaser spacecraft in the University of Colorado at Boulder’s Facility for Advanced Spatial Technology. The university is one of Sierra Nevada’s partners on the design and development of the Dream Chaser orbital crew vehicle. Dream Chaser is one of five systems NASA invested in during Commercial Crew Development Round 1 CCDev1 activities in order to aid in the innovation and development of American-led commercial capabilities for crew transportation and rescue services to and from the International Space Station and other low Earth orbit destinations. In 2011, NASA's Commercial Crew Program CCP entered into another funded Space Act Agreement with Sierra Nevada for the second round of commercial crew development CCDev2) so the company could further develop its Dream Chaser spacecraft for NASA transportation services. For information about CCP, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Photo credit: Sierra Nevada Corp. KSC-2012-1014

BOULDER, Colo. – A Sierra Nevada Corp. team member examines the company's structural test article for the Dream Chaser spacecraft in the University of Colorado at Boulder’s Facility for Advanced Spatial Technology. The university is one of Sierra Nevada’s partners on the design and development of the Dream Chaser orbital crew vehicle. Dream Chaser is one of five systems NASA invested in during Commercial Crew Development Round 1 CCDev1 activities in order to aid in the innovation and development of American-led commercial capabilities for crew transportation and rescue services to and from the International Space Station and other low Earth orbit destinations. In 2011, NASA's Commercial Crew Program CCP entered into another funded Space Act Agreement with Sierra Nevada for the second round of commercial crew development CCDev2) so the company could further develop its Dream Chaser spacecraft for NASA transportation services. For information about CCP, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Photo credit: Sierra Nevada Corp. KSC-2012-1014

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Sierra Nevada Space Systems (SNSS) of Sparks, Nev., and NASA signed a Space Act Agreement that will offer the company technical capabilities from Kennedy's uniquely skilled work force. Kennedy will help Sierra Nevada with the ground operations support of its lifting body reusable spacecraft called "Dream Chaser." The spacecraft, seen here as a display, resembles a smaller version of the space shuttle orbiter. The spacecraft would carry as many as seven astronauts to the space station. Through the new agreement, Kennedy's work force will use its experience of processing the shuttle fleet for 30 years to help Sierra Nevada define and execute Dream Chaser's launch preparations and post-landing activities. In 2010 and 2011, Sierra Nevada was awarded grants as part of the initiative to stimulate the private sector in developing and demonstrating human spaceflight capabilities for NASA's Commercial Crew Program. The goal of the program, which is based in Florida at Kennedy, is to facilitate the development of a U.S. commercial crew space transportation capability by achieving safe, reliable and cost-effective access to and from the space station and future low Earth orbit destinations. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-5120

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Sierra Nevada Space Systems (SNSS) of Sparks, Nev., and NASA signed a Space Act Agreement that will offer the company technical capabilities from Kennedy's uniquely skilled work force. Kennedy will help Sierra Nevada with the ground operations support of its lifting body reusable spacecraft called "Dream Chaser." The spacecraft, seen here as a display, resembles a smaller version of the space shuttle orbiter.      The spacecraft would carry as many as seven astronauts to the space station. Through the new agreement, Kennedy's work force will use its experience of processing the shuttle fleet for 30 years to help Sierra Nevada define and execute Dream Chaser's launch preparations and post-landing activities. In 2010 and 2011, Sierra Nevada was awarded grants as part of the initiative to stimulate the private sector in developing and demonstrating human spaceflight capabilities for NASA's Commercial Crew Program. The goal of the program, which is based in Florida at Kennedy, is to facilitate the development of a U.S. commercial crew space transportation capability by achieving safe, reliable and cost-effective access to and from the space station and future low Earth orbit destinations. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-5120

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA and Sierra Nevada Space Systems (SNSS) of Sparks, Nev., enter into a Space Act Agreement that will offer the company technical capabilities from Kennedy Space Center's uniquely skilled work force. Sitting, from left, are NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden; Kennedy Center Director Bob Cabana; and Mark Sirangelo, head of Sierra Nevada. Standing, from left, Kennedy Deputy Director Janet Petro; Jim Voss, vice president of Sierra Nevada's Space Exploration Systems; and Merri Sanchez, senior director of Sierra Nevada's Space Exploration Systems. Kennedy will help Sierra Nevada with the ground operations support of its lifting body reusable spacecraft called "Dream Chaser," which resembles a smaller version of the space shuttle orbiter. The spacecraft would carry as many as seven astronauts to the space station. Through the new agreement, Kennedy's work force will use its experience of processing the shuttle fleet for 30 years to help Sierra Nevada define and execute Dream Chaser's launch preparations and post-landing activities. In 2010 and 2011, Sierra Nevada was awarded grants as part of the initiative to stimulate the private sector in developing and demonstrating human spaceflight capabilities for NASA's Commercial Crew Program. The goal of the program, which is based in Florida at Kennedy, is to facilitate the development of a U.S. commercial crew space transportation capability by achieving safe, reliable and cost-effective access to and from the space station and future low Earth orbit destinations. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-5117

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA and Sierra Nevada Space Systems (SNSS) of Sparks, Nev., enter into a Space Act Agreement that will offer the company technical capabilities from Kennedy Space Center's uniquely skilled work force. Sitting, from left, are NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden; Kennedy Center Director Bob Cabana; and Mark Sirangelo, head of Sierra Nevada. Standing, from left, Kennedy Deputy Director Janet Petro; Jim Voss, vice president of Sierra Nevada's Space Exploration Systems; and Merri Sanchez, senior director of Sierra Nevada's Space Exploration Systems. Kennedy will help Sierra Nevada with the ground operations support of its lifting body reusable spacecraft called "Dream Chaser," which resembles a smaller version of the space shuttle orbiter.        The spacecraft would carry as many as seven astronauts to the space station. Through the new agreement, Kennedy's work force will use its experience of processing the shuttle fleet for 30 years to help Sierra Nevada define and execute Dream Chaser's launch preparations and post-landing activities. In 2010 and 2011, Sierra Nevada was awarded grants as part of the initiative to stimulate the private sector in developing and demonstrating human spaceflight capabilities for NASA's Commercial Crew Program. The goal of the program, which is based in Florida at Kennedy, is to facilitate the development of a U.S. commercial crew space transportation capability by achieving safe, reliable and cost-effective access to and from the space station and future low Earth orbit destinations. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-5117

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana, left, Mark Sirangelo, head of Sierra Nevada Space Systems (SNSS) of Sparks, Nev., and NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden pose for a photo after signing a Space Act Agreement that will offer the company technical capabilities from Kennedy's uniquely skilled work force. Kennedy will help Sierra Nevada with the ground operations support of its lifting body reusable spacecraft called "Dream Chaser," which resembles a smaller version of the space shuttle orbiter. The spacecraft would carry as many as seven astronauts to the space station. Through the new agreement, Kennedy's work force will use its experience of processing the shuttle fleet for 30 years to help Sierra Nevada define and execute Dream Chaser's launch preparations and post-landing activities. In 2010 and 2011, Sierra Nevada was awarded grants as part of the initiative to stimulate the private sector in developing and demonstrating human spaceflight capabilities for NASA's Commercial Crew Program. The goal of the program, which is based in Florida at Kennedy, is to facilitate the development of a U.S. commercial crew space transportation capability by achieving safe, reliable and cost-effective access to and from the space station and future low Earth orbit destinations. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-5119

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana, left, Mark Sirangelo, head of Sierra Nevada Space Systems (SNSS) of Sparks, Nev., and NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden pose for a photo after signing a Space Act Agreement that will offer the company technical capabilities from Kennedy's uniquely skilled work force. Kennedy will help Sierra Nevada with the ground operations support of its lifting body reusable spacecraft called "Dream Chaser," which resembles a smaller version of the space shuttle orbiter.    The spacecraft would carry as many as seven astronauts to the space station. Through the new agreement, Kennedy's work force will use its experience of processing the shuttle fleet for 30 years to help Sierra Nevada define and execute Dream Chaser's launch preparations and post-landing activities. In 2010 and 2011, Sierra Nevada was awarded grants as part of the initiative to stimulate the private sector in developing and demonstrating human spaceflight capabilities for NASA's Commercial Crew Program. The goal of the program, which is based in Florida at Kennedy, is to facilitate the development of a U.S. commercial crew space transportation capability by achieving safe, reliable and cost-effective access to and from the space station and future low Earth orbit destinations. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-5119

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Sierra Nevada Space Systems (SNSS) of Sparks, Nev., and NASA signed a Space Act Agreement that will offer the company technical capabilities from Kennedy's uniquely skilled work force. Kennedy will help Sierra Nevada with the ground operations support of its lifting body reusable spacecraft called "Dream Chaser." The spacecraft, seen here as a display, resembles a smaller version of the space shuttle orbiter. The spacecraft would carry as many as seven astronauts to the space station. Through the new agreement, Kennedy's work force will use its experience of processing the shuttle fleet for 30 years to help Sierra Nevada define and execute Dream Chaser's launch preparations and post-landing activities. In 2010 and 2011, Sierra Nevada was awarded grants as part of the initiative to stimulate the private sector in developing and demonstrating human spaceflight capabilities for NASA's Commercial Crew Program. The goal of the program, which is based in Florida at Kennedy, is to facilitate the development of a U.S. commercial crew space transportation capability by achieving safe, reliable and cost-effective access to and from the space station and future low Earth orbit destinations. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-5121

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Sierra Nevada Space Systems (SNSS) of Sparks, Nev., and NASA signed a Space Act Agreement that will offer the company technical capabilities from Kennedy's uniquely skilled work force. Kennedy will help Sierra Nevada with the ground operations support of its lifting body reusable spacecraft called "Dream Chaser." The spacecraft, seen here as a display, resembles a smaller version of the space shuttle orbiter.    The spacecraft would carry as many as seven astronauts to the space station. Through the new agreement, Kennedy's work force will use its experience of processing the shuttle fleet for 30 years to help Sierra Nevada define and execute Dream Chaser's launch preparations and post-landing activities. In 2010 and 2011, Sierra Nevada was awarded grants as part of the initiative to stimulate the private sector in developing and demonstrating human spaceflight capabilities for NASA's Commercial Crew Program. The goal of the program, which is based in Florida at Kennedy, is to facilitate the development of a U.S. commercial crew space transportation capability by achieving safe, reliable and cost-effective access to and from the space station and future low Earth orbit destinations. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-5121

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA and Sierra Nevada Space Systems (SNSS) of Sparks, Nev., sign a Space Act Agreement that will offer the company technical capabilities from Kennedy Space Center's uniquely skilled work force. Sitting, from left, are Kennedy Public Affairs Director Lisa Malone; NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden; Kennedy Center Director Bob Cabana; and Mark Sirangelo, head of Sierra Nevada. Standing, from left, are Frank DiBello, president of Space Florida; Joyce Riquelme, manager of Kennedy's Center Planning and Development Office; John Curry, director of Sierra Nevada's Systems Integration, Test and Operations; Kennedy Deputy Director Janet Petro; Jim Voss, vice president of Sierra Nevada's Space Exploration Systems; and Merri Sanchez, senior director of Sierra Nevada's Space Exploration Systems. Kennedy will help Sierra Nevada with the ground operations support of its lifting body reusable spacecraft called "Dream Chaser," which resembles a smaller version of the space shuttle orbiter. The spacecraft would carry as many as seven astronauts to the space station. Through the new agreement, Kennedy's work force will use its experience of processing the shuttle fleet for 30 years to help Sierra Nevada define and execute Dream Chaser's launch preparations and post-landing activities. In 2010 and 2011, Sierra Nevada was awarded grants as part of the initiative to stimulate the private sector in developing and demonstrating human spaceflight capabilities for NASA's Commercial Crew Program. The goal of the program, which is based in Florida at Kennedy, is to facilitate the development of a U.S. commercial crew space transportation capability by achieving safe, reliable and cost-effective access to and from the space station and future low Earth orbit destinations. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-5116

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA and Sierra Nevada Space Systems (SNSS) of Sparks, Nev., sign a Space Act Agreement that will offer the company technical capabilities from Kennedy Space Center's uniquely skilled work force. Sitting, from left, are Kennedy Public Affairs Director Lisa Malone; NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden; Kennedy Center Director Bob Cabana; and Mark Sirangelo, head of Sierra Nevada. Standing, from left, are Frank DiBello, president of Space Florida; Joyce Riquelme, manager of Kennedy's Center Planning and Development Office; John Curry, director of Sierra Nevada's Systems Integration, Test and Operations; Kennedy Deputy Director Janet Petro; Jim Voss, vice president of Sierra Nevada's Space Exploration Systems; and Merri Sanchez, senior director of Sierra Nevada's Space Exploration Systems. Kennedy will help Sierra Nevada with the ground operations support of its lifting body reusable spacecraft called "Dream Chaser," which resembles a smaller version of the space shuttle orbiter.          The spacecraft would carry as many as seven astronauts to the space station. Through the new agreement, Kennedy's work force will use its experience of processing the shuttle fleet for 30 years to help Sierra Nevada define and execute Dream Chaser's launch preparations and post-landing activities. In 2010 and 2011, Sierra Nevada was awarded grants as part of the initiative to stimulate the private sector in developing and demonstrating human spaceflight capabilities for NASA's Commercial Crew Program. The goal of the program, which is based in Florida at Kennedy, is to facilitate the development of a U.S. commercial crew space transportation capability by achieving safe, reliable and cost-effective access to and from the space station and future low Earth orbit destinations. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-5116

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA and Sierra Nevada Space Systems (SNSS) of Sparks, Nev., prepare to sign a Space Act Agreement that will offer the company technical capabilities from Kennedy Space Center's uniquely skilled work force. Sitting, from left, are Kennedy Public Affairs Director Lisa Malone; NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden; Kennedy Center Director Bob Cabana; and Mark Sirangelo, head of Sierra Nevada. Standing, from left, are Joyce Riquelme, manager of Kennedy's Center Planning and Development Office; John Curry, director of Sierra Nevada's Systems Integration, Test and Operations; Kennedy Deputy Director Janet Petro; Jim Voss, vice president of Sierra Nevada's Space Exploration Systems; and Merri Sanchez, senior director of Sierra Nevada's Space Exploration Systems. Kennedy will help Sierra Nevada with the ground operations support of its lifting body reusable spacecraft called "Dream Chaser," which resembles a smaller version of the space shuttle orbiter. The spacecraft would carry as many as seven astronauts to the space station. Through the new agreement, Kennedy's work force will use its experience of processing the shuttle fleet for 30 years to help Sierra Nevada define and execute Dream Chaser's launch preparations and post-landing activities. In 2010 and 2011, Sierra Nevada was awarded grants as part of the initiative to stimulate the private sector in developing and demonstrating human spaceflight capabilities for NASA's Commercial Crew Program. The goal of the program, which is based in Florida at Kennedy, is to facilitate the development of a U.S. commercial crew space transportation capability by achieving safe, reliable and cost-effective access to and from the space station and future low Earth orbit destinations. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-5115

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA and Sierra Nevada Space Systems (SNSS) of Sparks, Nev., prepare to sign a Space Act Agreement that will offer the company technical capabilities from Kennedy Space Center's uniquely skilled work force. Sitting, from left, are Kennedy Public Affairs Director Lisa Malone; NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden; Kennedy Center Director Bob Cabana; and Mark Sirangelo, head of Sierra Nevada. Standing, from left, are Joyce Riquelme, manager of Kennedy's Center Planning and Development Office; John Curry, director of Sierra Nevada's Systems Integration, Test and Operations; Kennedy Deputy Director Janet Petro; Jim Voss, vice president of Sierra Nevada's Space Exploration Systems; and Merri Sanchez, senior director of Sierra Nevada's Space Exploration Systems. Kennedy will help Sierra Nevada with the ground operations support of its lifting body reusable spacecraft called "Dream Chaser," which resembles a smaller version of the space shuttle orbiter.            The spacecraft would carry as many as seven astronauts to the space station. Through the new agreement, Kennedy's work force will use its experience of processing the shuttle fleet for 30 years to help Sierra Nevada define and execute Dream Chaser's launch preparations and post-landing activities. In 2010 and 2011, Sierra Nevada was awarded grants as part of the initiative to stimulate the private sector in developing and demonstrating human spaceflight capabilities for NASA's Commercial Crew Program. The goal of the program, which is based in Florida at Kennedy, is to facilitate the development of a U.S. commercial crew space transportation capability by achieving safe, reliable and cost-effective access to and from the space station and future low Earth orbit destinations. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2011-5115

LOUISVILLE, Colo. – During NASA's Commercial Crew Development Round 2 CCDev2) activities for the Commercial Crew Program CCP, Sierra Nevada Corp. SNC built a Simulator and Avionics Laboratory to help engineers evaluate the Dream Chaser's characteristics during the piloted phases of flight. Located at Sierra Nevada’s Space Systems facility in Louisville, Colo., it consists of a physical cockpit and integrated simulation hardware and software. The simulator is linked to the Vehicle Avionics Integration Laboratory, or VAIL, which serves as a platform for Dream Chaser avionics development, engineering testing and integration. VAIL also will also be used for verification and validation of avionics and software. Sierra Nevada is one of seven companies NASA entered into Space Act Agreements SAAs with during CCDev2 to aid in the innovation and development of American-led commercial capabilities for crew transportation and rescue services to and from the International Space Station and other low Earth orbit destinations. For information about CCP, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Photo credit: Sierra Nevada Corp. KSC-2012-2891

LOUISVILLE, Colo. – During NASA's Commercial Crew Development Round 2 CCDev2) activities for the Commercial Crew Program CCP, Sierra Nevada Corp. SNC built a Simulator and Avionics Laboratory to help engineers evaluate the Dream Chaser's characteristics during the piloted phases of flight. Located at Sierra Nevada’s Space Systems facility in Louisville, Colo., it consists of a physical cockpit and integrated simulation hardware and software. The simulator is linked to the Vehicle Avionics Integration Laboratory, or VAIL, which serves as a platform for Dream Chaser avionics development, engineering testing and integration. VAIL also will also be used for verification and validation of avionics and software.  Sierra Nevada is one of seven companies NASA entered into Space Act Agreements SAAs with during CCDev2 to aid in the innovation and development of American-led commercial capabilities for crew transportation and rescue services to and from the International Space Station and other low Earth orbit destinations. For information about CCP, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew.  Photo credit: Sierra Nevada Corp. KSC-2012-2891

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- This is an artist's conception of the Dream Chaser spacecraft under development by Sierra Nevada of Centennial, Colo., for NASA's Commercial Crew Program (CCP). In 2011, NASA selected Sierra Nevada during Commercial Crew Development Round 2 (CCDev2) activities to mature the design and development of a crew transportation system with the overall goal of accelerating a United States-led capability to the International Space Station. The goal of CCP is to drive down the cost of space travel as well as open up space to more people than ever before by balancing industry’s own innovative capabilities with NASA's 50 years of human spaceflight experience. Six other aerospace companies also are maturing launch vehicle and spacecraft designs under CCDev2, including Alliant Techsystems Inc. (ATK), The Boeing Co., Excalibur Almaz Inc., Blue Origin, Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX), and United Launch Alliance (ULA). For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: Sierra Nevada Corp. KSC-2011-8116

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- This is an artist's conception of the Dream Chaser spacecraft under development by Sierra Nevada of Centennial, Colo., for NASA's Commercial Crew Program (CCP). In 2011, NASA selected Sierra Nevada during Commercial Crew Development Round 2 (CCDev2) activities to mature the design and development of a crew transportation system with the overall goal of accelerating a United States-led capability to the International Space Station. The goal of CCP is to drive down the cost of space travel as well as open up space to more people than ever before by balancing industry’s own innovative capabilities with NASA's 50 years of human spaceflight experience. Six other aerospace companies also are maturing launch vehicle and spacecraft designs under CCDev2, including Alliant Techsystems Inc. (ATK), The Boeing Co., Excalibur Almaz Inc., Blue Origin, Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX), and United Launch Alliance (ULA). For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: Sierra Nevada Corp. KSC-2011-8116

LOUISVILLE, Colo. – During NASA's Commercial Crew Development Round 2 CCDev2) activities for the Commercial Crew Program CCP, Sierra Nevada Corp. SNC delivered the primary structure of its Dream Chaser flight test vehicle to the company’s office in Louisville, Colo. SNC engineers currently are assembling the full-scale prototype, which includes the integration of secondary structures and subsystems. This all-composite structure of the company's planned winged spacecraft, the Dream Chaser, will be used to carry out several remaining CCDev2 milestones including a captive carry flight and the first approach and landing test of the spacecraft. During the captive carry flight, a carrier aircraft will the Dream Chaser vehicle over NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in Edwards, Calif. Sierra Nevada is one of seven companies NASA entered into Space Act Agreements SAAs with during CCDev2 to aid in the innovation and development of American-led commercial capabilities for crew transportation and rescue services to and from the International Space Station and other low Earth orbit destinations. For information about CCP, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Photo credit: Sierra Nevada Corp. KSC-2012-1308

LOUISVILLE, Colo. – During NASA's Commercial Crew Development Round 2 CCDev2) activities for the Commercial Crew Program CCP, Sierra Nevada Corp. SNC delivered the primary structure of its Dream Chaser flight test vehicle to the company’s office in Louisville, Colo. SNC engineers currently are assembling the full-scale prototype, which includes the integration of secondary structures and subsystems. This all-composite structure of the company's planned winged spacecraft, the Dream Chaser, will be used to carry out several remaining CCDev2 milestones including a captive carry flight and the first approach and landing test of the spacecraft. During the captive carry flight, a carrier aircraft will the Dream Chaser vehicle over NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in Edwards, Calif. Sierra Nevada is one of seven companies NASA entered into Space Act Agreements SAAs with during CCDev2 to aid in the innovation and development of American-led commercial capabilities for crew transportation and rescue services to and from the International Space Station and other low Earth orbit destinations. For information about CCP, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Photo credit: Sierra Nevada Corp. KSC-2012-1308

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- This is an artist's conception of the Dream Chaser spacecraft integrated with an Atlas V rocket. Dream Chaser is under development by Sierra Nevada of Centennial, Colo., for NASA's Commercial Crew Program (CCP). In 2011, NASA selected Sierra Nevada during Commercial Crew Development Round 2 (CCDev2) activities to mature the design and development of a crew transportation system with the overall goal of accelerating a United States-led capability to the International Space Station. United Launch Alliance's Atlas V also is being considered under CCDev2. The goal of CCP is to drive down the cost of space travel as well as open up space to more people than ever before by balancing industry’s own innovative capabilities with NASA's 50 years of human spaceflight experience. Five other aerospace companies also are maturing launch vehicle and spacecraft designs under CCDev2, including Alliant Techsystems Inc. (ATK), The Boeing Co., Excalibur Almaz Inc., Blue Origin, and Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX). For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: Sierra Nevada Corp. KSC-2012-1015

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- This is an artist's conception of the Dream Chaser spacecraft integrated with an Atlas V rocket. Dream Chaser is under development by Sierra Nevada of Centennial, Colo., for NASA's Commercial Crew Program (CCP). In 2011, NASA selected Sierra Nevada during Commercial Crew Development Round 2 (CCDev2) activities to mature the design and development of a crew transportation system with the overall goal of accelerating a United States-led capability to the International Space Station. United Launch Alliance's Atlas V also is being considered under CCDev2. The goal of CCP is to drive down the cost of space travel as well as open up space to more people than ever before by balancing industry’s own innovative capabilities with NASA's 50 years of human spaceflight experience. Five other aerospace companies also are maturing launch vehicle and spacecraft designs under CCDev2, including Alliant Techsystems Inc. (ATK), The Boeing Co., Excalibur Almaz Inc., Blue Origin, and Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX). For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: Sierra Nevada Corp. KSC-2012-1015

LOUISVILLE, Colo. – Sierra Nevada Corporation Space Systems’ Dream Chaser full-scale test vehicle is lifted by an Erickson Air-Crane helicopter to verify proper aerodynamic flight performance near the Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport in Jefferson County, Colo. This captive-carry test is one of several milestones the company is meeting during its partnership with NASA’s Commercial Crew Program CCP. Data from this test will provide SNC an early opportunity to evaluate and prove hardware, facilities and ground operations in preparation for approach and landing tests scheduled for later this year. In 2011, NASA selected Sierra Nevada during Commercial Crew Development Round 2 CCDev2) activities to mature the design and development of a crew transportation system with the overall goal of accelerating a United States-led capability to the International Space Station. The goal of CCP is to drive down the cost of space travel as well as open up space to more people than ever before by balancing industry’s own innovative capabilities with NASA's 50 years of human spaceflight experience. Six other aerospace companies also are maturing launch vehicle and spacecraft designs under CCDev2, including Alliant Techsystems Inc. ATK, The Boeing Co., Excalibur Almaz Inc., Blue Origin, Space Exploration Technologies SpaceX, and United Launch Alliance ULA. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: Sierra Nevada Corp. KSC-2012-3148

LOUISVILLE, Colo. – Sierra Nevada Corporation Space Systems’ Dream Chaser full-scale test vehicle is lifted by an Erickson Air-Crane helicopter to verify proper aerodynamic flight performance near the Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport in Jefferson County, Colo. This captive-carry test is one of several milestones the company is meeting during its partnership with NASA’s Commercial Crew Program CCP. Data from this test will provide SNC an early opportunity to evaluate and prove hardware, facilities and ground operations in preparation for approach and landing tests scheduled for later this year.     In 2011, NASA selected Sierra Nevada during Commercial Crew Development Round 2 CCDev2) activities to mature the design and development of a crew transportation system with the overall goal of accelerating a United States-led capability to the International Space Station. The goal of CCP is to drive down the cost of space travel as well as open up space to more people than ever before by balancing industry’s own innovative capabilities with NASA's 50 years of human spaceflight experience. Six other aerospace companies also are maturing launch vehicle and spacecraft designs under CCDev2, including Alliant Techsystems Inc. ATK, The Boeing Co., Excalibur Almaz Inc., Blue Origin, Space Exploration Technologies SpaceX, and United Launch Alliance ULA. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: Sierra Nevada Corp. KSC-2012-3148

LOUISVILLE, Colo. – An Erickson Air-Crane helicopter lifts Sierra Nevada Corporation Space Systems’ Dream Chaser full-scale test vehicle to verify proper aerodynamic flight performance near the Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport in Jefferson County, Colo. This captive-carry test is one of several milestones the company is meeting during its partnership with NASA’s Commercial Crew Program CCP. Data from this test will provide SNC an early opportunity to evaluate and prove hardware, facilities and ground operations in preparation for approach and landing tests scheduled for later this year. In 2011, NASA selected Sierra Nevada during Commercial Crew Development Round 2 CCDev2) activities to mature the design and development of a crew transportation system with the overall goal of accelerating a United States-led capability to the International Space Station. The goal of CCP is to drive down the cost of space travel as well as open up space to more people than ever before by balancing industry’s own innovative capabilities with NASA's 50 years of human spaceflight experience. Six other aerospace companies also are maturing launch vehicle and spacecraft designs under CCDev2, including Alliant Techsystems Inc. ATK, The Boeing Co., Excalibur Almaz Inc., Blue Origin, Space Exploration Technologies SpaceX, and United Launch Alliance ULA. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: Sierra Nevada Corp. KSC-2012-3149

LOUISVILLE, Colo. – An Erickson Air-Crane helicopter lifts Sierra Nevada Corporation Space Systems’ Dream Chaser full-scale test vehicle to verify proper aerodynamic flight performance near the Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport in Jefferson County, Colo. This captive-carry test is one of several milestones the company is meeting during its partnership with NASA’s Commercial Crew Program CCP. Data from this test will provide SNC an early opportunity to evaluate and prove hardware, facilities and ground operations in preparation for approach and landing tests scheduled for later this year.     In 2011, NASA selected Sierra Nevada during Commercial Crew Development Round 2 CCDev2) activities to mature the design and development of a crew transportation system with the overall goal of accelerating a United States-led capability to the International Space Station. The goal of CCP is to drive down the cost of space travel as well as open up space to more people than ever before by balancing industry’s own innovative capabilities with NASA's 50 years of human spaceflight experience. Six other aerospace companies also are maturing launch vehicle and spacecraft designs under CCDev2, including Alliant Techsystems Inc. ATK, The Boeing Co., Excalibur Almaz Inc., Blue Origin, Space Exploration Technologies SpaceX, and United Launch Alliance ULA. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: Sierra Nevada Corp. KSC-2012-3149

LOUISVILLE, Colo. – Sierra Nevada Corporation Space Systems’ Dream Chaser full-scale test vehicle is lifted by an Erickson Air-Crane helicopter to verify proper aerodynamic flight performance near the Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport in Jefferson County, Colo. This captive-carry test is one of several milestones the company is meeting during its partnership with NASA’s Commercial Crew Program CCP. Data from this test will provide SNC an early opportunity to evaluate and prove hardware, facilities and ground operations in preparation for approach and landing tests scheduled for later this year. In 2011, NASA selected Sierra Nevada during Commercial Crew Development Round 2 CCDev2) activities to mature the design and development of a crew transportation system with the overall goal of accelerating a United States-led capability to the International Space Station. The goal of CCP is to drive down the cost of space travel as well as open up space to more people than ever before by balancing industry’s own innovative capabilities with NASA's 50 years of human spaceflight experience. Six other aerospace companies also are maturing launch vehicle and spacecraft designs under CCDev2, including Alliant Techsystems Inc. ATK, The Boeing Co., Excalibur Almaz Inc., Blue Origin, Space Exploration Technologies SpaceX, and United Launch Alliance ULA. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: Sierra Nevada Corp. KSC-2012-3150

LOUISVILLE, Colo. – Sierra Nevada Corporation Space Systems’ Dream Chaser full-scale test vehicle is lifted by an Erickson Air-Crane helicopter to verify proper aerodynamic flight performance near the Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport in Jefferson County, Colo. This captive-carry test is one of several milestones the company is meeting during its partnership with NASA’s Commercial Crew Program CCP. Data from this test will provide SNC an early opportunity to evaluate and prove hardware, facilities and ground operations in preparation for approach and landing tests scheduled for later this year.    In 2011, NASA selected Sierra Nevada during Commercial Crew Development Round 2 CCDev2) activities to mature the design and development of a crew transportation system with the overall goal of accelerating a United States-led capability to the International Space Station. The goal of CCP is to drive down the cost of space travel as well as open up space to more people than ever before by balancing industry’s own innovative capabilities with NASA's 50 years of human spaceflight experience. Six other aerospace companies also are maturing launch vehicle and spacecraft designs under CCDev2, including Alliant Techsystems Inc. ATK, The Boeing Co., Excalibur Almaz Inc., Blue Origin, Space Exploration Technologies SpaceX, and United Launch Alliance ULA. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: Sierra Nevada Corp. KSC-2012-3150

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- This is an artist's conception of Sierra Nevada Corp. SNC Space System's Dream Chaser spacecraft atop a United Launch Alliance ULA Atlas V rocket under development for NASA's Commercial Crew Program, or CCP. The integrated system was selected for CCP's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative to propel America's next human space transportation system to low Earth orbit forward. Operating under a funded Space Act Agreement, or SAA, SNC will spend the next 21 months completing its design, conducting critical risk reduction testing on its spacecraft and launch vehicle, and showcasing how it would operate and manage missions from launch through orbit and landing, setting the stage for a future demonstration mission. To learn more about CCP, which is based at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida and supported by NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: SNC KSC-2012-4213

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- This is an artist's conception of Sierra Nevada Corp. SNC Space System's Dream Chaser spacecraft atop a United Launch Alliance ULA Atlas V rocket under development for NASA's Commercial Crew Program, or CCP. The integrated system was selected for CCP's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative to propel America's next human space transportation system to low Earth orbit forward. Operating under a funded Space Act Agreement, or SAA, SNC will spend the next 21 months completing its design, conducting critical risk reduction testing on its spacecraft and launch vehicle, and showcasing how it would operate and manage missions from launch through orbit and landing, setting the stage for a future demonstration mission. To learn more about CCP, which is based at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida and supported by NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: SNC KSC-2012-4213

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Space Florida President Frank DiBello, NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden, and Boeing's Vice President and General Manager of Space Exploration John Elbon address the media inside Orbiter Processing Facility-3, or OPF-3, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Bolden took a few dozen media on a road show tour of the center and adjacent Cape Canaveral Air Force Station to show the progress being made for future government and commercial space endeavors that will begin from Florida's Space Coast. Boeing is leasing OPF-3 through an agreement with Space Florida for the manufacturing and assembly of its CST-100 spacecraft, which is under development in collaboration with NASA's Commercial Crew Program. During his tour, Bolden announced that Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, has completed its Space Act Agreement with NASA for Commercial Orbital Transportation Services. SpaceX is scheduled to launch the first of its 12 contracted cargo flights to the space station from Cape Canaveral this October, under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services Program. Bolden also announced NASA partner Sierra Nevada Corp. has conducted its first milestone under the agency’s recently announced Commercial Crew Integrated Capability CCiCap initiative. The milestone, a program implementation plan review, marks an important first step in Sierra Nevada’s efforts to develop a crew transportation system with its Dream Chaser spacecraft. Through NASA’s commercial space initiatives and programs, the agency is providing investments to stimulate the American commercial space industry. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2012-4602

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Space Florida President Frank DiBello, NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden, and Boeing's Vice President and General Manager of Space Exploration John Elbon address the media inside Orbiter Processing Facility-3, or OPF-3, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Bolden took a few dozen media on a road show tour of the center and adjacent Cape Canaveral Air Force Station to show the progress being made for future government and commercial space endeavors that will begin from Florida's Space Coast. Boeing is leasing OPF-3 through an agreement with Space Florida for the manufacturing and assembly of its CST-100 spacecraft, which is under development in collaboration with NASA's Commercial Crew Program.      During his tour, Bolden announced that Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, has completed its Space Act Agreement with NASA for Commercial Orbital Transportation Services. SpaceX is scheduled to launch the first of its 12 contracted cargo flights to the space station from Cape Canaveral this October, under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services Program. Bolden also announced NASA partner Sierra Nevada Corp. has conducted its first milestone under the agency’s recently announced Commercial Crew Integrated Capability CCiCap initiative. The milestone, a program implementation plan review, marks an important first step in Sierra Nevada’s efforts to develop a crew transportation system with its Dream Chaser spacecraft. Through NASA’s commercial space initiatives and programs, the agency is providing investments to stimulate the American commercial space industry. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2012-4602

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden, right, and Boeing's Vice President and General Manager of Space Exploration John Elbon address the media inside Orbiter Processing Facility-3, or OPF-3, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Bolden took a few dozen media on a road show tour of the center and adjacent Cape Canaveral Air Force Station to show the progress being made for future government and commercial space endeavors that will begin from Florida's Space Coast. Boeing is leasing OPF-3 through an agreement with Space Florida for the manufacturing and assembly of its CST-100 spacecraft, which is under development in collaboration with NASA's Commercial Crew Program. During his tour, Bolden announced that Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, has completed its Space Act Agreement with NASA for Commercial Orbital Transportation Services. SpaceX is scheduled to launch the first of its 12 contracted cargo flights to the space station from Cape Canaveral this October, under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services Program. Bolden also announced NASA partner Sierra Nevada Corp. has conducted its first milestone under the agency’s recently announced Commercial Crew Integrated Capability CCiCap initiative. The milestone, a program implementation plan review, marks an important first step in Sierra Nevada’s efforts to develop a crew transportation system with its Dream Chaser spacecraft. Through NASA’s commercial space initiatives and programs, the agency is providing investments to stimulate the American commercial space industry. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2012-4600

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden, right, and Boeing's Vice President and General Manager of Space Exploration John Elbon address the media inside Orbiter Processing Facility-3, or OPF-3, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Bolden took a few dozen media on a road show tour of the center and adjacent Cape Canaveral Air Force Station to show the progress being made for future government and commercial space endeavors that will begin from Florida's Space Coast. Boeing is leasing OPF-3 through an agreement with Space Florida for the manufacturing and assembly of its CST-100 spacecraft, which is under development in collaboration with NASA's Commercial Crew Program.          During his tour, Bolden announced that Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, has completed its Space Act Agreement with NASA for Commercial Orbital Transportation Services. SpaceX is scheduled to launch the first of its 12 contracted cargo flights to the space station from Cape Canaveral this October, under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services Program. Bolden also announced NASA partner Sierra Nevada Corp. has conducted its first milestone under the agency’s recently announced Commercial Crew Integrated Capability CCiCap initiative. The milestone, a program implementation plan review, marks an important first step in Sierra Nevada’s efforts to develop a crew transportation system with its Dream Chaser spacecraft. Through NASA’s commercial space initiatives and programs, the agency is providing investments to stimulate the American commercial space industry. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2012-4600

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Inside the Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, processing facility near NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden announced new milestones in the nation’s commercial space initiatives. Bolden announced that SpaceX has completed its Space Act Agreement with NASA for Commercial Orbital Transportation Services. SpaceX is scheduled to launch the first of its 12 contracted cargo flights to the space station from Cape Canaveral this October, under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services Program. Bolden also announced NASA partner Sierra Nevada Corp. has conducted its first milestone under the agency’s recently announced Commercial Crew Integrated Capability initiative. The milestone, a program implementation plan review, marks an important first step in Sierra Nevada’s efforts to develop a crew transportation system with its Dream Chaser spacecraft. Through NASA’s commercial space initiatives and programs, the agency is providing investments to stimulate the American commercial space industry. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2012-4585

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Inside the Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, processing facility near NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden announced new milestones in the nation’s commercial space initiatives.     Bolden announced that SpaceX has completed its Space Act Agreement with NASA for Commercial Orbital Transportation Services. SpaceX is scheduled to launch the first of its 12 contracted cargo flights to the space station from Cape Canaveral this October, under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services Program. Bolden also announced NASA partner Sierra Nevada Corp. has conducted its first milestone under the agency’s recently announced Commercial Crew Integrated Capability initiative. The milestone, a program implementation plan review, marks an important first step in Sierra Nevada’s efforts to develop a crew transportation system with its Dream Chaser spacecraft. Through NASA’s commercial space initiatives and programs, the agency is providing investments to stimulate the American commercial space industry. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2012-4585

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Space Florida President Frank DiBello, NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden, and Boeing's Vice President and General Manager of Space Exploration John Elbon address the media inside Orbiter Processing Facility-3, or OPF-3, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Bolden took a few dozen media on a road show tour of the center and adjacent Cape Canaveral Air Force Station to show the progress being made for future government and commercial space endeavors that will begin from Florida's Space Coast. Boeing is leasing OPF-3 through an agreement with Space Florida for the manufacturing and assembly of its CST-100 spacecraft, which is under development in collaboration with NASA's Commercial Crew Program. During his tour, Bolden announced that Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, has completed its Space Act Agreement with NASA for Commercial Orbital Transportation Services. SpaceX is scheduled to launch the first of its 12 contracted cargo flights to the space station from Cape Canaveral this October, under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services Program. Bolden also announced NASA partner Sierra Nevada Corp. has conducted its first milestone under the agency’s recently announced Commercial Crew Integrated Capability CCiCap initiative. The milestone, a program implementation plan review, marks an important first step in Sierra Nevada’s efforts to develop a crew transportation system with its Dream Chaser spacecraft. Through NASA’s commercial space initiatives and programs, the agency is providing investments to stimulate the American commercial space industry. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2012-4601

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Space Florida President Frank DiBello, NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden, and Boeing's Vice President and General Manager of Space Exploration John Elbon address the media inside Orbiter Processing Facility-3, or OPF-3, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Bolden took a few dozen media on a road show tour of the center and adjacent Cape Canaveral Air Force Station to show the progress being made for future government and commercial space endeavors that will begin from Florida's Space Coast. Boeing is leasing OPF-3 through an agreement with Space Florida for the manufacturing and assembly of its CST-100 spacecraft, which is under development in collaboration with NASA's Commercial Crew Program.        During his tour, Bolden announced that Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, has completed its Space Act Agreement with NASA for Commercial Orbital Transportation Services. SpaceX is scheduled to launch the first of its 12 contracted cargo flights to the space station from Cape Canaveral this October, under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services Program. Bolden also announced NASA partner Sierra Nevada Corp. has conducted its first milestone under the agency’s recently announced Commercial Crew Integrated Capability CCiCap initiative. The milestone, a program implementation plan review, marks an important first step in Sierra Nevada’s efforts to develop a crew transportation system with its Dream Chaser spacecraft. Through NASA’s commercial space initiatives and programs, the agency is providing investments to stimulate the American commercial space industry. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2012-4601

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Inside the Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, processing facility near NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Scott Thurston, partner integration office manager with the Commercial Crew Program, talks to the media prior to an announcement from NASA Administrator Charles Bolden about new milestones in the nation’s commercial space initiatives. Bolden announced that SpaceX has completed its Space Act Agreement with NASA for Commercial Orbital Transportation Services. SpaceX is scheduled to launch the first of its 12 contracted cargo flights to the space station from Cape Canaveral this October, under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services Program. Bolden also announced NASA partner Sierra Nevada Corp. has conducted its first milestone under the agency’s recently announced Commercial Crew Integrated Capability initiative. The milestone, a program implementation plan review, marks an important first step in Sierra Nevada’s efforts to develop a crew transportation system with its Dream Chaser spacecraft. Through NASA’s commercial space initiatives and programs, the agency is providing investments to stimulate the American commercial space industry. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2012-4583

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Inside the Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, processing facility near NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, Scott Thurston, partner integration office manager with the Commercial Crew Program, talks to the media prior to an announcement from NASA Administrator Charles Bolden about new milestones in the nation’s commercial space initiatives.     Bolden announced that SpaceX has completed its Space Act Agreement with NASA for Commercial Orbital Transportation Services. SpaceX is scheduled to launch the first of its 12 contracted cargo flights to the space station from Cape Canaveral this October, under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services Program. Bolden also announced NASA partner Sierra Nevada Corp. has conducted its first milestone under the agency’s recently announced Commercial Crew Integrated Capability initiative. The milestone, a program implementation plan review, marks an important first step in Sierra Nevada’s efforts to develop a crew transportation system with its Dream Chaser spacecraft. Through NASA’s commercial space initiatives and programs, the agency is providing investments to stimulate the American commercial space industry. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2012-4583

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Space Florida President Frank DiBello, NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden, and Boeing's Vice President and General Manager of Space Exploration John Elbon address the media inside Orbiter Processing Facility-3, or OPF-3, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Bolden took a few dozen media on a road show tour of the center and adjacent Cape Canaveral Air Force Station to show the progress being made for future government and commercial space endeavors that will begin from Florida's Space Coast. Boeing is leasing OPF-3 through an agreement with Space Florida for the manufacturing and assembly of its CST-100 spacecraft, which is under development in collaboration with NASA's Commercial Crew Program. During his tour, Bolden announced that Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, has completed its Space Act Agreement with NASA for Commercial Orbital Transportation Services. SpaceX is scheduled to launch the first of its 12 contracted cargo flights to the space station from Cape Canaveral this October, under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services Program. Bolden also announced NASA partner Sierra Nevada Corp. has conducted its first milestone under the agency’s recently announced Commercial Crew Integrated Capability CCiCap initiative. The milestone, a program implementation plan review, marks an important first step in Sierra Nevada’s efforts to develop a crew transportation system with its Dream Chaser spacecraft. Through NASA’s commercial space initiatives and programs, the agency is providing investments to stimulate the American commercial space industry. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2012-4603

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Space Florida President Frank DiBello, NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden, and Boeing's Vice President and General Manager of Space Exploration John Elbon address the media inside Orbiter Processing Facility-3, or OPF-3, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Bolden took a few dozen media on a road show tour of the center and adjacent Cape Canaveral Air Force Station to show the progress being made for future government and commercial space endeavors that will begin from Florida's Space Coast. Boeing is leasing OPF-3 through an agreement with Space Florida for the manufacturing and assembly of its CST-100 spacecraft, which is under development in collaboration with NASA's Commercial Crew Program.    During his tour, Bolden announced that Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, has completed its Space Act Agreement with NASA for Commercial Orbital Transportation Services. SpaceX is scheduled to launch the first of its 12 contracted cargo flights to the space station from Cape Canaveral this October, under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services Program. Bolden also announced NASA partner Sierra Nevada Corp. has conducted its first milestone under the agency’s recently announced Commercial Crew Integrated Capability CCiCap initiative. The milestone, a program implementation plan review, marks an important first step in Sierra Nevada’s efforts to develop a crew transportation system with its Dream Chaser spacecraft. Through NASA’s commercial space initiatives and programs, the agency is providing investments to stimulate the American commercial space industry. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2012-4603

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Space Florida President Frank DiBello, NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden, and Boeing's Vice President and General Manager of Space Exploration John Elbon address the media inside Orbiter Processing Facility-3, or OPF-3, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Bolden took a few dozen media on a road show tour of the center and adjacent Cape Canaveral Air Force Station to show the progress being made for future government and commercial space endeavors that will begin from Florida's Space Coast. Boeing is leasing OPF-3 through an agreement with Space Florida for the manufacturing and assembly of its CST-100 spacecraft, which is under development in collaboration with NASA's Commercial Crew Program. During his tour, Bolden announced that Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, has completed its Space Act Agreement with NASA for Commercial Orbital Transportation Services. SpaceX is scheduled to launch the first of its 12 contracted cargo flights to the space station from Cape Canaveral this October, under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services Program. Bolden also announced NASA partner Sierra Nevada Corp. has conducted its first milestone under the agency’s recently announced Commercial Crew Integrated Capability CCiCap initiative. The milestone, a program implementation plan review, marks an important first step in Sierra Nevada’s efforts to develop a crew transportation system with its Dream Chaser spacecraft. Through NASA’s commercial space initiatives and programs, the agency is providing investments to stimulate the American commercial space industry. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2012-4606

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Space Florida President Frank DiBello, NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden, and Boeing's Vice President and General Manager of Space Exploration John Elbon address the media inside Orbiter Processing Facility-3, or OPF-3, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Bolden took a few dozen media on a road show tour of the center and adjacent Cape Canaveral Air Force Station to show the progress being made for future government and commercial space endeavors that will begin from Florida's Space Coast. Boeing is leasing OPF-3 through an agreement with Space Florida for the manufacturing and assembly of its CST-100 spacecraft, which is under development in collaboration with NASA's Commercial Crew Program.      During his tour, Bolden announced that Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, has completed its Space Act Agreement with NASA for Commercial Orbital Transportation Services. SpaceX is scheduled to launch the first of its 12 contracted cargo flights to the space station from Cape Canaveral this October, under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services Program. Bolden also announced NASA partner Sierra Nevada Corp. has conducted its first milestone under the agency’s recently announced Commercial Crew Integrated Capability CCiCap initiative. The milestone, a program implementation plan review, marks an important first step in Sierra Nevada’s efforts to develop a crew transportation system with its Dream Chaser spacecraft. Through NASA’s commercial space initiatives and programs, the agency is providing investments to stimulate the American commercial space industry. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2012-4606

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Inside the Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, processing facility near NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden announced new milestones in the nation’s commercial space initiatives. Bolden announced that SpaceX has completed its Space Act Agreement with NASA for Commercial Orbital Transportation Services. SpaceX is scheduled to launch the first of its 12 contracted cargo flights to the space station from Cape Canaveral this October, under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services Program. Bolden also announced NASA partner Sierra Nevada Corp. has conducted its first milestone under the agency’s recently announced Commercial Crew Integrated Capability initiative. The milestone, a program implementation plan review, marks an important first step in Sierra Nevada’s efforts to develop a crew transportation system with its Dream Chaser spacecraft. Through NASA’s commercial space initiatives and programs, the agency is providing investments to stimulate the American commercial space industry. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2012-4586

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Inside the Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, processing facility near NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden announced new milestones in the nation’s commercial space initiatives.     Bolden announced that SpaceX has completed its Space Act Agreement with NASA for Commercial Orbital Transportation Services. SpaceX is scheduled to launch the first of its 12 contracted cargo flights to the space station from Cape Canaveral this October, under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services Program. Bolden also announced NASA partner Sierra Nevada Corp. has conducted its first milestone under the agency’s recently announced Commercial Crew Integrated Capability initiative. The milestone, a program implementation plan review, marks an important first step in Sierra Nevada’s efforts to develop a crew transportation system with its Dream Chaser spacecraft. Through NASA’s commercial space initiatives and programs, the agency is providing investments to stimulate the American commercial space industry. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2012-4586

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Space Florida President Frank DiBello, NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden, and Boeing's Vice President and General Manager of Space Exploration John Elbon address the media inside Orbiter Processing Facility-3, or OPF-3, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Bolden took a few dozen media on a road show tour of the center and adjacent Cape Canaveral Air Force Station to show the progress being made for future government and commercial space endeavors that will begin from Florida's Space Coast. Boeing is leasing OPF-3 through an agreement with Space Florida for the manufacturing and assembly of its CST-100 spacecraft, which is under development in collaboration with NASA's Commercial Crew Program. During his tour, Bolden announced that Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, has completed its Space Act Agreement with NASA for Commercial Orbital Transportation Services. SpaceX is scheduled to launch the first of its 12 contracted cargo flights to the space station from Cape Canaveral this October, under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services Program. Bolden also announced NASA partner Sierra Nevada Corp. has conducted its first milestone under the agency’s recently announced Commercial Crew Integrated Capability CCiCap initiative. The milestone, a program implementation plan review, marks an important first step in Sierra Nevada’s efforts to develop a crew transportation system with its Dream Chaser spacecraft. Through NASA’s commercial space initiatives and programs, the agency is providing investments to stimulate the American commercial space industry. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2012-4607

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Space Florida President Frank DiBello, NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden, and Boeing's Vice President and General Manager of Space Exploration John Elbon address the media inside Orbiter Processing Facility-3, or OPF-3, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Bolden took a few dozen media on a road show tour of the center and adjacent Cape Canaveral Air Force Station to show the progress being made for future government and commercial space endeavors that will begin from Florida's Space Coast. Boeing is leasing OPF-3 through an agreement with Space Florida for the manufacturing and assembly of its CST-100 spacecraft, which is under development in collaboration with NASA's Commercial Crew Program.    During his tour, Bolden announced that Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, has completed its Space Act Agreement with NASA for Commercial Orbital Transportation Services. SpaceX is scheduled to launch the first of its 12 contracted cargo flights to the space station from Cape Canaveral this October, under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services Program. Bolden also announced NASA partner Sierra Nevada Corp. has conducted its first milestone under the agency’s recently announced Commercial Crew Integrated Capability CCiCap initiative. The milestone, a program implementation plan review, marks an important first step in Sierra Nevada’s efforts to develop a crew transportation system with its Dream Chaser spacecraft. Through NASA’s commercial space initiatives and programs, the agency is providing investments to stimulate the American commercial space industry. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2012-4607

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Space Florida President Frank DiBello, NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden, and Boeing's Vice President and General Manager of Space Exploration John Elbon address the media inside Orbiter Processing Facility-3, or OPF-3, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Bolden took a few dozen media on a road show tour of the center and adjacent Cape Canaveral Air Force Station to show the progress being made for future government and commercial space endeavors that will begin from Florida's Space Coast. Boeing is leasing OPF-3 through an agreement with Space Florida for the manufacturing and assembly of its CST-100 spacecraft, which is under development in collaboration with NASA's Commercial Crew Program. During his tour, Bolden announced that Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, has completed its Space Act Agreement with NASA for Commercial Orbital Transportation Services. SpaceX is scheduled to launch the first of its 12 contracted cargo flights to the space station from Cape Canaveral this October, under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services Program. Bolden also announced NASA partner Sierra Nevada Corp. has conducted its first milestone under the agency’s recently announced Commercial Crew Integrated Capability CCiCap initiative. The milestone, a program implementation plan review, marks an important first step in Sierra Nevada’s efforts to develop a crew transportation system with its Dream Chaser spacecraft. Through NASA’s commercial space initiatives and programs, the agency is providing investments to stimulate the American commercial space industry. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2012-4605

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Space Florida President Frank DiBello, NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden, and Boeing's Vice President and General Manager of Space Exploration John Elbon address the media inside Orbiter Processing Facility-3, or OPF-3, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Bolden took a few dozen media on a road show tour of the center and adjacent Cape Canaveral Air Force Station to show the progress being made for future government and commercial space endeavors that will begin from Florida's Space Coast. Boeing is leasing OPF-3 through an agreement with Space Florida for the manufacturing and assembly of its CST-100 spacecraft, which is under development in collaboration with NASA's Commercial Crew Program.    During his tour, Bolden announced that Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, has completed its Space Act Agreement with NASA for Commercial Orbital Transportation Services. SpaceX is scheduled to launch the first of its 12 contracted cargo flights to the space station from Cape Canaveral this October, under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services Program. Bolden also announced NASA partner Sierra Nevada Corp. has conducted its first milestone under the agency’s recently announced Commercial Crew Integrated Capability CCiCap initiative. The milestone, a program implementation plan review, marks an important first step in Sierra Nevada’s efforts to develop a crew transportation system with its Dream Chaser spacecraft. Through NASA’s commercial space initiatives and programs, the agency is providing investments to stimulate the American commercial space industry. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2012-4605

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Inside the Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, processing facility near NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden announced new milestones in the nation’s commercial space initiatives. Bolden announced that SpaceX has completed its Space Act Agreement with NASA for Commercial Orbital Transportation Services. SpaceX is scheduled to launch the first of its 12 contracted cargo flights to the space station from Cape Canaveral this October, under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services Program. Bolden also announced NASA partner Sierra Nevada Corp. has conducted its first milestone under the agency’s recently announced Commercial Crew Integrated Capability initiative. The milestone, a program implementation plan review, marks an important first step in Sierra Nevada’s efforts to develop a crew transportation system with its Dream Chaser spacecraft. Through NASA’s commercial space initiatives and programs, the agency is providing investments to stimulate the American commercial space industry. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2012-4584

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Inside the Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, processing facility near NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden announced new milestones in the nation’s commercial space initiatives.     Bolden announced that SpaceX has completed its Space Act Agreement with NASA for Commercial Orbital Transportation Services. SpaceX is scheduled to launch the first of its 12 contracted cargo flights to the space station from Cape Canaveral this October, under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services Program. Bolden also announced NASA partner Sierra Nevada Corp. has conducted its first milestone under the agency’s recently announced Commercial Crew Integrated Capability initiative. The milestone, a program implementation plan review, marks an important first step in Sierra Nevada’s efforts to develop a crew transportation system with its Dream Chaser spacecraft. Through NASA’s commercial space initiatives and programs, the agency is providing investments to stimulate the American commercial space industry. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2012-4584

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Space Florida President Frank DiBello, NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden, and Boeing's Vice President and General Manager of Space Exploration John Elbon address the media inside Orbiter Processing Facility-3, or OPF-3, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Bolden took a few dozen media on a road show tour of the center and adjacent Cape Canaveral Air Force Station to show the progress being made for future government and commercial space endeavors that will begin from Florida's Space Coast. Boeing is leasing OPF-3 through an agreement with Space Florida for the manufacturing and assembly of its CST-100 spacecraft, which is under development in collaboration with NASA's Commercial Crew Program. During his tour, Bolden announced that Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, has completed its Space Act Agreement with NASA for Commercial Orbital Transportation Services. SpaceX is scheduled to launch the first of its 12 contracted cargo flights to the space station from Cape Canaveral this October, under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services Program. Bolden also announced NASA partner Sierra Nevada Corp. has conducted its first milestone under the agency’s recently announced Commercial Crew Integrated Capability CCiCap initiative. The milestone, a program implementation plan review, marks an important first step in Sierra Nevada’s efforts to develop a crew transportation system with its Dream Chaser spacecraft. Through NASA’s commercial space initiatives and programs, the agency is providing investments to stimulate the American commercial space industry. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2012-4604

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Space Florida President Frank DiBello, NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden, and Boeing's Vice President and General Manager of Space Exploration John Elbon address the media inside Orbiter Processing Facility-3, or OPF-3, at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Bolden took a few dozen media on a road show tour of the center and adjacent Cape Canaveral Air Force Station to show the progress being made for future government and commercial space endeavors that will begin from Florida's Space Coast. Boeing is leasing OPF-3 through an agreement with Space Florida for the manufacturing and assembly of its CST-100 spacecraft, which is under development in collaboration with NASA's Commercial Crew Program.      During his tour, Bolden announced that Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, has completed its Space Act Agreement with NASA for Commercial Orbital Transportation Services. SpaceX is scheduled to launch the first of its 12 contracted cargo flights to the space station from Cape Canaveral this October, under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services Program. Bolden also announced NASA partner Sierra Nevada Corp. has conducted its first milestone under the agency’s recently announced Commercial Crew Integrated Capability CCiCap initiative. The milestone, a program implementation plan review, marks an important first step in Sierra Nevada’s efforts to develop a crew transportation system with its Dream Chaser spacecraft. Through NASA’s commercial space initiatives and programs, the agency is providing investments to stimulate the American commercial space industry. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2012-4604

EDWARDS, Calif. – ED13-0142-08: The flatbed truck and trailer that transported Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, Space Systems' Dream Chaser engineering test article pauses behind Hangar 4802 on the aircraft ramp at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center on Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., upon arrival at the center. The vehicle was shrouded in protective plastic wrap with its wings and tail structure removed for its four-day overland transport from Sierra Nevada's facility in Louisville, Colo., to NASA Dryden. SNC is one of three companies working with NASA's Commercial Crew Program, or CCP, during the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Tom Tschida KSC-2013-2359

EDWARDS, Calif. – ED13-0142-08: The flatbed truck and trailer that transported Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, Space Systems' Dream Chaser engineering test article pauses behind Hangar 4802 on the aircraft ramp at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center on Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., upon arrival at the center. The vehicle was shrouded in protective plastic wrap with its wings and tail structure removed for its four-day overland transport from Sierra Nevada's facility in Louisville, Colo., to NASA Dryden.    SNC is one of three companies working with NASA's Commercial Crew Program, or CCP, during the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Tom Tschida KSC-2013-2359

EDWARDS, Calif. – ED13-0142-10: The flatbed truck and trailer that transported Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, Space Systems' Dream Chaser engineering test article pauses on the aircraft ramp at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center on Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., upon arrival at the center. Following removal of the protective plastic wrap and reinstallation of its wings and tail structure, the Dream Chaser will begin ground tests in the next few weeks leading to approach and landing flight tests this summer. SNC is one of three companies working with NASA's Commercial Crew Program, or CCP, during the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Tom Tschida KSC-2013-2360

EDWARDS, Calif. – ED13-0142-10: The flatbed truck and trailer that transported Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, Space Systems' Dream Chaser engineering test article pauses on the aircraft ramp at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center on Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., upon arrival at the center. Following removal of the protective plastic wrap and reinstallation of its wings and tail structure, the Dream Chaser will begin ground tests in the next few weeks leading to approach and landing flight tests this summer.      SNC is one of three companies working with NASA's Commercial Crew Program, or CCP, during the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Tom Tschida KSC-2013-2360

(left to right) NASA Langley aerospace engineer Bruce Jackson briefs astronauts Rex Walheim and Gregory Johnson about the Synthetic Vision (SV) and Enhanced Vision (EV) systems in a flight simulator at the center's Cockpit Motion Facility. The astronauts were training to land the Dream Chaser spacecraft May 15th 2013. credit NASA/David C. Bowman 2013-2363

(left to right) NASA Langley aerospace engineer Bruce Jackson briefs astronauts Rex Walheim and Gregory Johnson about the Synthetic Vision (SV) and Enhanced Vision (EV) systems in a flight simulator at the center's Cockpit Motion Facility. The astronauts were training to land the Dream Chaser spacecraft May 15th 2013. credit NASA/David C. Bowman 2013-2363

EDWARDS, Calif. – ED13-0142-03: Shrouded in plastic wrap with its wings and tail structure removed for ground transport, Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, Space Systems' Dream Chaser engineering test article is hauled across the bed of Rogers Dry Lake in front of the control tower at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. The Dream Chaser will begin its flight test program in collaboration with NASA's Commercial Crew Program this summer. SNC is one of three companies working with NASA's Commercial Crew Program, or CCP, during the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Tom Tschida KSC-2013-2358

EDWARDS, Calif. – ED13-0142-03: Shrouded in plastic wrap with its wings and tail structure removed for ground transport, Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, Space Systems' Dream Chaser engineering test article is hauled across the bed of Rogers Dry Lake in front of the control tower at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. The Dream Chaser will begin its flight test program in collaboration with NASA's Commercial Crew Program this summer.    SNC is one of three companies working with NASA's Commercial Crew Program, or CCP, during the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Tom Tschida KSC-2013-2358

HAMPTON, Va. – Bruce Jackson, an aerospace engineer at NASA’s Langley Flight Research Center, briefs astronauts Rex Walheim, left, and Gregory Johnson as they evaluate Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, Space Systems' Dream Chaser landing simulation, in support of NASA Commercial Crew Program, or CCP, efforts. The simulation makes use of the Synthetic Vision and Enhanced Vision systems in the center's Cockpit Motion Facility. SNC is one of three companies working with CCP during the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/David C. Bowman KSC-2013-2363

HAMPTON, Va. – Bruce Jackson, an aerospace engineer at NASA’s Langley Flight Research Center, briefs astronauts Rex Walheim, left, and Gregory Johnson as they evaluate Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, Space Systems' Dream Chaser landing simulation, in support of NASA Commercial Crew Program, or CCP, efforts. The simulation makes use of the Synthetic Vision and Enhanced Vision systems in the center's Cockpit Motion Facility.     SNC is one of three companies working with CCP during the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/David C. Bowman KSC-2013-2363

EDWARDS, Calif. – ED13-0142-01: With its wings and tail structure removed and shrouded in plastic wrap for ground transport, Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, Space Systems' Dream Chaser engineering test article is hauled across the bed of Rogers Dry Lake at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. The Dream Chaser will begin its approach-and-landing flight test program in collaboration with NASA's Commercial Crew Program this summer. SNC is one of three companies working with NASA's Commercial Crew Program, or CCP, during the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Tom Tschida KSC-2013-2357

EDWARDS, Calif. – ED13-0142-01: With its wings and tail structure removed and shrouded in plastic wrap for ground transport, Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, Space Systems' Dream Chaser engineering test article is hauled across the bed of Rogers Dry Lake at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., to NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. The Dream Chaser will begin its approach-and-landing flight test program in collaboration with NASA's Commercial Crew Program this summer.       SNC is one of three companies working with NASA's Commercial Crew Program, or CCP, during the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Tom Tschida KSC-2013-2357

EDWARDS, Calif. – ED13-0142-11: The truck and trailer that transported the Dream Chaser engineering test article from Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, Space Systems facility in Louisville, Colo., arrives on the aircraft ramp at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center on Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., early in the morning. Based on NASA's HL-20 lifting body design, the Dream Chaser will begin its approach-and-landing flight test program in collaboration with NASA's Commercial Crew Program this summer. SNC is one of three companies working with NASA's Commercial Crew Program, or CCP, during the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Tom Tschida KSC-2013-2361

EDWARDS, Calif. – ED13-0142-11: The truck and trailer that transported the Dream Chaser engineering test article from Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, Space Systems facility in Louisville, Colo., arrives on the aircraft ramp at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center on Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., early in the morning. Based on NASA's HL-20 lifting body design, the Dream Chaser will begin its approach-and-landing flight test program in collaboration with NASA's Commercial Crew Program this summer.    SNC is one of three companies working with NASA's Commercial Crew Program, or CCP, during the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Tom Tschida KSC-2013-2361

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-161-35 - Sierra Nevada Corporation SNC Space Systems' team members tow the Dream Chaser flight vehicle out to a concrete runway at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in California for range and taxi tow tests. The ground testing will validate the performance of the spacecraft's nose skid, brakes, tires and other systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year. SNC is one of three companies working with NASA's Commercial Crew Program, or CCP, during the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3016

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-161-35 - Sierra Nevada Corporation SNC Space Systems' team members tow the Dream Chaser flight vehicle out to a concrete runway at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in California for range and taxi tow tests. The ground testing will validate the performance of the spacecraft's nose skid, brakes, tires and other systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year.    SNC is one of three companies working with NASA's Commercial Crew Program, or CCP, during the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3016

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-164-32 - Sierra Nevada Corporation SNC Space Systems' team members tow the Dream Chaser flight vehicle out to a concrete runway at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in California for range and taxi tow tests. The ground testing will validate the performance of the spacecraft's nose skid, brakes, tires and other systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year. SNC is one of three companies working with NASA's Commercial Crew Program, or CCP, during the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3019

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-164-32 - Sierra Nevada Corporation SNC Space Systems' team members tow the Dream Chaser flight vehicle out to a concrete runway at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in California for range and taxi tow tests. The ground testing will validate the performance of the spacecraft's nose skid, brakes, tires and other systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year.      SNC is one of three companies working with NASA's Commercial Crew Program, or CCP, during the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3019

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-164-33 - Sierra Nevada Corporation SNC Space Systems' team members tow the Dream Chaser flight vehicle out to a concrete runway at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in California for range and taxi tow tests. The ground testing will validate the performance of the spacecraft's nose skid, brakes, tires and other systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year. SNC is one of three companies working with NASA's Commercial Crew Program, or CCP, during the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3020

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-164-33 - Sierra Nevada Corporation SNC Space Systems' team members tow the Dream Chaser flight vehicle out to a concrete runway at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in California for range and taxi tow tests. The ground testing will validate the performance of the spacecraft's nose skid, brakes, tires and other systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year.    SNC is one of three companies working with NASA's Commercial Crew Program, or CCP, during the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3020

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-164-34 - Sierra Nevada Corporation SNC Space Systems' team members tow the Dream Chaser flight vehicle out to a concrete runway at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in California for range and taxi tow tests. The ground testing will validate the performance of the spacecraft's nose skid, brakes, tires and other systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year. SNC is one of three companies working with NASA's Commercial Crew Program, or CCP, during the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3022

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-164-34 - Sierra Nevada Corporation SNC Space Systems' team members tow the Dream Chaser flight vehicle out to a concrete runway at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in California for range and taxi tow tests. The ground testing will validate the performance of the spacecraft's nose skid, brakes, tires and other systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year.        SNC is one of three companies working with NASA's Commercial Crew Program, or CCP, during the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3022

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-164-34 - Sierra Nevada Corporation SNC Space Systems' team members tow the Dream Chaser flight vehicle out to a concrete runway at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in California for range and taxi tow tests. The ground testing will validate the performance of the spacecraft's nose skid, brakes, tires and other systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year. SNC is one of three companies working with NASA's Commercial Crew Program, or CCP, during the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3021

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-164-34 - Sierra Nevada Corporation SNC Space Systems' team members tow the Dream Chaser flight vehicle out to a concrete runway at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in California for range and taxi tow tests. The ground testing will validate the performance of the spacecraft's nose skid, brakes, tires and other systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year.        SNC is one of three companies working with NASA's Commercial Crew Program, or CCP, during the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3021

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-0215-024 - Sierra Nevada Corporation SNC Space Systems' team members prepare to tow the Dream Chaser flight vehicle along a concrete runway at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in California for range and taxi tow tests. The ground testing will validate the performance of the spacecraft's nose skid, brakes, tires and other systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year. SNC is one of three companies working with NASA's Commercial Crew Program, or CCP, during the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3024

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-0215-024 - Sierra Nevada Corporation SNC Space Systems' team members prepare to tow the Dream Chaser flight vehicle along a concrete runway at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in California for range and taxi tow tests. The ground testing will validate the performance of the spacecraft's nose skid, brakes, tires and other systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year.    SNC is one of three companies working with NASA's Commercial Crew Program, or CCP, during the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3024

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-0215-072 - Sierra Nevada Corporation SNC Space Systems' team members tow the Dream Chaser flight vehicle along a concrete runway at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in California for range and taxi tow tests. The ground testing will validate the performance of the spacecraft's nose skid, brakes, tires and other systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year. SNC is one of three companies working with NASA's Commercial Crew Program, or CCP, during the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3025

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-0215-072 - Sierra Nevada Corporation SNC Space Systems' team members tow the Dream Chaser flight vehicle along a concrete runway at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in California for range and taxi tow tests. The ground testing will validate the performance of the spacecraft's nose skid, brakes, tires and other systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year.  SNC is one of three companies working with NASA's Commercial Crew Program, or CCP, during the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3025

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-0215-016 - Sierra Nevada Corporation SNC Space Systems' team members prepare to tow the Dream Chaser flight vehicle along a concrete runway at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in California for range and taxi tow tests. The ground testing will validate the performance of the spacecraft's nose skid, brakes, tires and other systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year. SNC is one of three companies working with NASA's Commercial Crew Program, or CCP, during the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3023

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-0215-016 - Sierra Nevada Corporation SNC Space Systems' team members prepare to tow the Dream Chaser flight vehicle along a concrete runway at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in California for range and taxi tow tests. The ground testing will validate the performance of the spacecraft's nose skid, brakes, tires and other systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year.      SNC is one of three companies working with NASA's Commercial Crew Program, or CCP, during the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3023

HAMPTON, Va. –An engineer monitors high-speed wind tunnel testing of a 10-inch long ceramic model of the Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, Dream Chaser spacecraft at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va. The tests measure how much heat the winged vehicle would experience during ascent and re-entry through the atmosphere, including the spacecraft's lower- and upper-body flaps, elevons and a rudder. They're also helping the company obtain necessary data for the material selection and design of the spacecraft's thermal protection system. SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/David Bowman KSC-2013-3627

HAMPTON, Va. –An engineer monitors high-speed wind tunnel testing of a 10-inch long ceramic model of the Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, Dream Chaser spacecraft at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va. The tests measure how much heat the winged vehicle would experience during ascent and re-entry through the atmosphere, including the spacecraft's lower- and upper-body flaps, elevons and a rudder. They're also helping the company obtain necessary data for the material selection and design of the spacecraft's thermal protection system.        SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/David Bowman KSC-2013-3627

Dream Chaser Model Being Tested at Langley Research Center (LaRC

Dream Chaser Model Being Tested at Langley Research Center (LaRC

HAMPTON, Va. –A 10-inch long ceramic model of the Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, Dream Chaser spacecraft is prepared for high-speed wind tunnel tests at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va. The tests measure how much heat the winged vehicle would experience during ascent and re-entry through the atmosphere, including the spacecraft's lower- and upper-body flaps, elevons and a rudder. They're also helping the company obtain necessary data for the material selection and design of the spacecraft's thermal protection system. SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/David Bowman KSC-2013-3628

HAMPTON, Va. –A 10-inch long ceramic model of the Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, Dream Chaser spacecraft is prepared for high-speed wind tunnel tests at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va. The tests measure how much heat the winged vehicle would experience during ascent and re-entry through the atmosphere, including the spacecraft's lower- and upper-body flaps, elevons and a rudder. They're also helping the company obtain necessary data for the material selection and design of the spacecraft's thermal protection system.      SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/David Bowman KSC-2013-3628

Dream Chaser Model Being Tested at Langley Research Center (LaRC

Dream Chaser Model Being Tested at Langley Research Center (LaRC

Dream Chaser Model Being Tested at Langley Research Center (LaRC

Dream Chaser Model Being Tested at Langley Research Center (LaRC

HAMPTON, Va. –A 10-inch long ceramic model of the Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, Dream Chaser spacecraft undergoes high-speed wind tunnel tests at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va. The tests measure how much heat the winged vehicle would experience during ascent and re-entry through the atmosphere, including the spacecraft's lower- and upper-body flaps, elevons and a rudder. They're also helping the company obtain necessary data for the material selection and design of the spacecraft's thermal protection system. SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/David Bowman KSC-2013-3630

HAMPTON, Va. –A 10-inch long ceramic model of the Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, Dream Chaser spacecraft undergoes high-speed wind tunnel tests at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va. The tests measure how much heat the winged vehicle would experience during ascent and re-entry through the atmosphere, including the spacecraft's lower- and upper-body flaps, elevons and a rudder. They're also helping the company obtain necessary data for the material selection and design of the spacecraft's thermal protection system.      SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/David Bowman KSC-2013-3630

Dream Chaser Model Being Tested at Langley Research Center (LaRC

Dream Chaser Model Being Tested at Langley Research Center (LaRC

HAMPTON, Va. –Engineers monitor high-speed wind tunnel testing of a 10-inch long ceramic model of the Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, Dream Chaser spacecraft at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va. The tests measure how much heat the winged vehicle would experience during ascent and re-entry through the atmosphere, including the spacecraft's lower- and upper-body flaps, elevons and a rudder. They're also helping the company obtain necessary data for the material selection and design of the spacecraft's thermal protection system. SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/David Bowman KSC-2013-3629

HAMPTON, Va. –Engineers monitor high-speed wind tunnel testing of a 10-inch long ceramic model of the Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, Dream Chaser spacecraft at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va. The tests measure how much heat the winged vehicle would experience during ascent and re-entry through the atmosphere, including the spacecraft's lower- and upper-body flaps, elevons and a rudder. They're also helping the company obtain necessary data for the material selection and design of the spacecraft's thermal protection system.      SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/David Bowman KSC-2013-3629

Dream Chaser Model Being Tested at Langley Research Center (LaRC

Dream Chaser Model Being Tested at Langley Research Center (LaRC

HAMPTON, Va. –A 10-inch long ceramic model of the Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, Dream Chaser spacecraft is prepared for high-speed wind tunnel tests at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va. The tests measure how much heat the winged vehicle would experience during ascent and re-entry through the atmosphere, including the spacecraft's lower- and upper-body flaps, elevons and a rudder. They're also helping the company obtain necessary data for the material selection and design of the spacecraft's thermal protection system. SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/David Bowman KSC-2013-3626

HAMPTON, Va. –A 10-inch long ceramic model of the Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, Dream Chaser spacecraft is prepared for high-speed wind tunnel tests at NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va. The tests measure how much heat the winged vehicle would experience during ascent and re-entry through the atmosphere, including the spacecraft's lower- and upper-body flaps, elevons and a rudder. They're also helping the company obtain necessary data for the material selection and design of the spacecraft's thermal protection system.    SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative, which is intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/David Bowman KSC-2013-3626

Dream Chaser Model Being Tested at Langley Research Center (LaRC

Dream Chaser Model Being Tested at Langley Research Center (LaRC

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- This graphic depicts the patriotic endeavor of NASA's three Commercial Crew Program, or CCP, partners. The Boeing Company of Houston, Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, of Louisville, Colo., and Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, of Hawthorne, Calif., are working under the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative and Certification Products Contract, or CPC, phase to develop spaceflight capabilities that eventually could provide launch services to transport NASA astronauts to the International Space Station from U.S. soil. Shown along the bottom, from left, are: Boeing's integrated CST-100 spacecraft and United Launch Alliance, or ULA, Atlas V rocket SNC's integrated Dream Chaser spacecraft and Atlas V and SpaceX's integrated Dragon spacecraft and Falcon 9 rocket. In the center are artist depictions of company spacecraft in orbit. At the top is NASA's destination for crew transportation in low-Earth orbit, the International Space Station. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA KSC-2013-3522

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- This graphic depicts the patriotic endeavor of NASA's three Commercial Crew Program, or CCP, partners. The Boeing Company of Houston, Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, of Louisville, Colo., and Space Exploration Technologies, or SpaceX, of Hawthorne, Calif., are working under the agency's Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, initiative and Certification Products Contract, or CPC, phase to develop spaceflight capabilities that eventually could provide launch services to transport NASA astronauts to the International Space Station from U.S. soil. Shown along the bottom, from left, are: Boeing's integrated CST-100 spacecraft and United Launch Alliance, or ULA, Atlas V rocket SNC's integrated Dream Chaser spacecraft and Atlas V and SpaceX's integrated Dragon spacecraft and Falcon 9 rocket. In the center are artist depictions of company spacecraft in orbit. At the top is NASA's destination for crew transportation in low-Earth orbit, the International Space Station. For more information, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA KSC-2013-3522

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-0266-008- The Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, Dream Chaser flight vehicle is prepared for 60 mph tow tests on taxi and runways at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Ground testing at 10, 20, 40 and 60 miles per hour is helping the company validate the performance of the spacecraft's braking and landing systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year. SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Development Round 2, or CCDev2, and Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, phases, which are intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3296

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-0266-008- The Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, Dream Chaser flight vehicle is prepared for 60 mph tow tests on taxi and runways at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Ground testing at 10, 20, 40 and 60 miles per hour is helping the company validate the performance of the spacecraft's braking and landing systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year.            SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Development Round 2, or CCDev2, and Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, phases, which are intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3296

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-0266-021- A Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, team member prepares for 60 mph tow tests of the company's Dream Chaser flight vehicle on taxi and runways at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Ground testing at 10, 20, 40 and 60 miles per hour is helping the company validate the performance of the spacecraft's braking and landing systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year. SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Development Round 2, or CCDev2, and Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, phases, which are intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3301

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-0266-021-  A Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, team member prepares for 60 mph tow tests of the company's Dream Chaser flight vehicle on taxi and runways at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Ground testing at 10, 20, 40 and 60 miles per hour is helping the company validate the performance of the spacecraft's braking and landing systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year.                  SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Development Round 2, or CCDev2, and Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, phases, which are intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3301

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-0266-012- Technicians prepare for 60 mph tow tests of Sierra Nevada Corporation's, or SNC's, Dream Chaser flight vehicle on taxi and runways at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Ground testing at 10, 20, 40 and 60 miles per hour is helping the company validate the performance of the spacecraft's braking and landing systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year. SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Development Round 2, or CCDev2, and Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, phases, which are intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3298

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-0266-012- Technicians prepare for 60 mph tow tests of Sierra Nevada Corporation's, or SNC's, Dream Chaser flight vehicle on taxi and runways at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Ground testing at 10, 20, 40 and 60 miles per hour is helping the company validate the performance of the spacecraft's braking and landing systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year.                SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Development Round 2, or CCDev2, and Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, phases, which are intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3298

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-0266-047- A pickup truck pulls the Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, Dream Chaser flight vehicle through 60 mile per hour tow tests on taxi and runways at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Ground testing at 10, 20, 40 and 60 miles per hour is helping the company validate the performance of the spacecraft's braking and landing systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year. SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Development Round 2, or CCDev2, and Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, phases, which are intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3232

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-0266-047- A pickup truck pulls the Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, Dream Chaser flight vehicle through 60 mile per hour tow tests on taxi and runways at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Ground testing at 10, 20, 40 and 60 miles per hour is helping the company validate the performance of the spacecraft's braking and landing systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year.              SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Development Round 2, or CCDev2, and Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, phases, which are intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3232

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-0266-046- Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, team members prepare for 60 mph tow tests of the company's Dream Chaser flight vehicle on taxi and runways at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Ground testing at 10, 20, 40 and 60 miles per hour is helping the company validate the performance of the spacecraft's braking and landing systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year. SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Development Round 2, or CCDev2, and Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, phases, which are intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3303

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-0266-046- Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, team members prepare for 60 mph tow tests of the company's Dream Chaser flight vehicle on taxi and runways at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Ground testing at 10, 20, 40 and 60 miles per hour is helping the company validate the performance of the spacecraft's braking and landing systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year.                SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Development Round 2, or CCDev2, and Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, phases, which are intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3303

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-0266-045- Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, team members prepare for 60 mph tow tests of the company's Dream Chaser flight vehicle on taxi and runways at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Ground testing at 10, 20, 40 and 60 miles per hour is helping the company validate the performance of the spacecraft's braking and landing systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year. SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Development Round 2, or CCDev2, and Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, phases, which are intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3302

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-0266-045- Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, team members prepare for 60 mph tow tests of the company's Dream Chaser flight vehicle on taxi and runways at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Ground testing at 10, 20, 40 and 60 miles per hour is helping the company validate the performance of the spacecraft's braking and landing systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year.    SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Development Round 2, or CCDev2, and Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, phases, which are intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3302

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-0266-023- The Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, Dream Chaser flight vehicle is prepared for 60 mile per hour tow tests on taxi and runways at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Ground testing at 10, 20, 40 and 60 miles per hour is helping the company validate the performance of the spacecraft's braking and landing systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year. SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Development Round 2, or CCDev2, and Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, phases, which are intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3230

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-0266-023- The Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, Dream Chaser flight vehicle is prepared for 60 mile per hour tow tests on taxi and runways at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Ground testing at 10, 20, 40 and 60 miles per hour is helping the company validate the performance of the spacecraft's braking and landing systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year.          SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Development Round 2, or CCDev2, and Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, phases, which are intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3230

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-0266-010- The Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, Dream Chaser flight vehicle is prepared for 60 mph tow tests on taxi and runways at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Ground testing at 10, 20, 40 and 60 miles per hour is helping the company validate the performance of the spacecraft's braking and landing systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year. SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Development Round 2, or CCDev2, and Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, phases, which are intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3297

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-0266-010- The Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, Dream Chaser flight vehicle is prepared for 60 mph tow tests on taxi and runways at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Ground testing at 10, 20, 40 and 60 miles per hour is helping the company validate the performance of the spacecraft's braking and landing systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year.              SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Development Round 2, or CCDev2, and Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, phases, which are intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3297

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-0266-069- Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, team members check the company's Dream Chaser flight vehicle systems following a 60 mph tow test on taxi and runways at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Ground testing at 10, 20, 40 and 60 miles per hour is helping the company validate the performance of the spacecraft's braking and landing systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year. SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Development Round 2, or CCDev2, and Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, phases, which are intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3309

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-0266-069- Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, team members check the company's Dream Chaser flight vehicle systems following a 60 mph tow test on taxi and runways at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Ground testing at 10, 20, 40 and 60 miles per hour is helping the company validate the performance of the spacecraft's braking and landing systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year.          SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Development Round 2, or CCDev2, and Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, phases, which are intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3309

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-0266-013- Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, team members prepare for 60 mph tow tests of the company's Dream Chaser flight vehicle on taxi and runways at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Ground testing at 10, 20, 40 and 60 miles per hour is helping the company validate the performance of the spacecraft's braking and landing systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year. SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Development Round 2, or CCDev2, and Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, phases, which are intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3299

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-0266-013- Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, team members prepare for 60 mph tow tests of the company's Dream Chaser flight vehicle on taxi and runways at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Ground testing at 10, 20, 40 and 60 miles per hour is helping the company validate the performance of the spacecraft's braking and landing systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year.                  SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Development Round 2, or CCDev2, and Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, phases, which are intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3299

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-0266-016- Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, team members prepare for 60 mph tow tests of the company's Dream Chaser flight vehicle on taxi and runways at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Ground testing at 10, 20, 40 and 60 miles per hour is helping the company validate the performance of the spacecraft's braking and landing systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year. SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Development Round 2, or CCDev2, and Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, phases, which are intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3300

Edwards, Calif. – ED13-0266-016- Sierra Nevada Corporation, or SNC, team members prepare for 60 mph tow tests of the company's Dream Chaser flight vehicle on taxi and runways at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Ground testing at 10, 20, 40 and 60 miles per hour is helping the company validate the performance of the spacecraft's braking and landing systems prior to captive-carry and free-flight tests scheduled for later this year.                    SNC is continuing the development of its Dream Chaser spacecraft under the agency's Commercial Crew Development Round 2, or CCDev2, and Commercial Crew Integrated Capability, or CCiCap, phases, which are intended to lead to the availability of commercial human spaceflight services for government and commercial customers. To learn more about CCP and its industry partners, visit www.nasa.gov/commercialcrew. Image credit: NASA/Ken Ulbrich KSC-2013-3300