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Pendant Capsule in the Form of a Tau Cross, with the Trinity and the Virgin and Child

American Red Cross - Miscellaneous - Sometimes the American Red Cross doctor puts the capsule or powder into the rough hands of the mukter, for his administering

[Vice President Thomas R. Marshall drawing draft capsule]

Dr. J.D. Jones administers worm treatment with capsule to mule belonging to H.W. Jones, FSA (Farm Security Administration) borrower getting benefit of veterinary cooperative in West Carroll Parish, Louisiana

Parke, Davis and Company, manufacturing chemists, Detroit, Michigan. A capsule filling machine

Parke, Davis and Company, manufacturing chemists, Detroit, Michigan. A capsule filling machine

Parke, Davis and Company, manufacturing chemists, Detroit, Michigan. An automatic empty gelatin capsule machine

Parke, Davis and Company, manufacturing chemicals, Detroit, Michigan. A capsule filling machine

Parke, Davis and Company, manufacturing chemists, Detroit, Michigan. An automatic empty gelatin capsule machine

Parke, Davis and Company, manufacturing chemists, Detroit, Michigan. An automatic empty gelatin capsule machine

Abbott Laboratories, 1350 Cote de Liesse, Montreal, Canada. Capsule filling

Photograph of John Glenn Seating inside the Mercury Capsule during a Flight Simulation Test

Photograph of Alan Shepard before Being Placed inside the Mercury Capsule for a Flight Simulation Test Run

Mercury Project

Project Mercury - Capsule #2

Jupiter, AM-18, for pre-flight test - Early Rockets

NASA Photographer Prepares to Film a Mercury Capsule

Mercury Capsule Construction at the NASA Lewis Research Center

Photograph of Earth from an Air Force Atlas Intercontinental Ballistic Missile

Big Joe capsule leaves its launching pad - Mercury Project

Big Joe launch vehicle after launching at Cape Canaveral

Mercury Capsule Model in the 1- by 1-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

MA-1 Capsule Reassembled After Explosion

Hi-Speed impact test simulating space debris hitting an orbiting capsule. A blunt nose 20 millimeter model built of polyethylene hitting a aluminum target at 19,500 feet per second, in a pressure simulated as 100,000 feet altitude. ARC-1960-A-26921-B

Mercury Capsule Retrorocket Test in the Altitude Wind Tunnel

Failed Attempt to Recover Liberty Bell 7

Astronaut Alan Shepard in pressure suit with Freedom 7 capsule

ASTRONAUT SHEPARD - PRESSURE SUIT - FREEDOM "7" CAPSULE

LITTLE JOE 5A - CAPSULE 14

Alan Shepard

Shepard Hoisted from Mercury Capsule

Pig in Capsule Drawing

Primate Ham - Fitted Suit - Couch - Mercury-Redstone (MR)-2 - Capsule #5

Photograph of Ham the Chimpanzee Reaching for an Apple after Landing Safely inside a Mercury Capsule

MERCURY-ATLAS (MA)-2 - LIFTOFF - CAPE

MERCURY CAPSULE - WATER EGRESS TRAINING

Recovery of the Little Joe 5A spacecraft

Liftoff of MR-BD carrying a dummy capsule. Pad 5 Photo by: Special & Hopkins 61C-532

Mating of Little Joe 5B vehicle with Mercury Capsule #14

Mercury capsule mock-up suspended from ship during water egress training

Astronaut Alan Shepard - U.S.S. Champlain - Post-Recovery Mercury Capsule

Astronaut Alan Shepard on U.S. Champlain after recovery of Mercury capsule

Mercury Project - recovery of the Freedom 7 (MR-3) capsule by a U.S. Marine helicopter.

Astronaut Alan Shepard inspects his capsule on U.S. Champlain after recovery

Astronaut Alan Shepard onboard helicopter after recovery of Mercury capsule

View of Astronaut Alan Shepard inside the Freedom 7 capsule

CLOSEUP - ASTRONAUT SHEPARD, ALAN - PRESSURE SUIT - FREEDOM 7 CAPSULE

Astronaut John Glenn inspecting interior of Mercury capsule

Astronaut Grissom on level 3 in front of Liberty Bell 7 capsule

Astronaut Grissom on level 3 in front of Liberty Bell 7 capsule

Astronaut Grissom climbs into Liberty Bell 7 capsule to begin MR-4 mission

Astronaut Grissom - Cabin - "Liberty Bell 7" - Capsule

Mercury Project

Mercury Project - Liberty Bell 7 capsule for the MR-4 Mission

LIFTOFF - MERCURY-ATLAS (MA)-4 - CAPSULE 8A - CAPE

Return of John Glenn's space capsule

[Television screen showing depiction of John Glenn in the Friendship 7 space capsule, looking at the control panel during his orbit around earth on February 20, 1962]

Chimp and Man Ejections

Chimp and Man Ejections
Chimp and Man Ejections

John Glenn OK

[Television screen showing depiction of John Glenn's Friendship 7 space capsule approaching North America, during his orbit around earth on February 20, 1962]

John Glenn enters his Friendship 7 capsule

[Television screen showing depiction of panel with a circular device, over which is written "Glenn's Voice", during John Glenn's orbit around earth in the Friendship 7 space capsule on February 20, 1962]

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Capsule #13 atop MA-6 with egress facility extended to capsule. PAD 14, CCMTA. Photo credit: NASA KSC-LOD-62C-128

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- CCMTA, NASA:MERCURY, Pad 14 Mercury Atlas-6 with Capsule #13. Photo credit: NASA/USAF KSC-LOD-62-475

Astronaut John Glenn inspects decal for side of his Mercury capsule

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Astronaut John H. Glenn Jr. enters his Mercury capsule, "Friendship 7," as he prepares for launch of the Mercury-Atlas rocket. On February 20, 1962, Glenn lifted off into space aboard his Mercury Atlas 6 MA-6 rocket and became the first American to orbit the Earth. After orbiting the Earth 3 times, Friendship 7 landed in the Atlantic Ocean 4 hours, 55 minutes and 23 seconds later, just East of Grand Turk Island in the Bahamas. Glenn and his capsule were recovered by the Navy Destroyer Noa, 21 minutes after splashdown. Photo credit: NASA KSC-S63-01207

Photograph of Astronaut John H. Glenn, Jr. Walking to Capsule

Closeup View - Astronaut John Glenn - Insertion - Mercury Capsule - Cape

View of Friendship 7 capsule on top of booster rocket

President John F. Kennedy Peers into Space Capsule at the Presentation Ceremony of NASA Distinguished Service Medal (DSM) to Astronaut and Colonel John Glenn, Jr. at Hangar 'S' at Cape Canaveral, Florida

Ablation Test of Mercury Capsule ARC-1962-A-28917-8

Ablation Test of Mercury Capsule ARC-1962-A-28917-3

ASTRONAUT CARPENTER, SCOTT - MERCURY-ATLAS (MA)-7 - "AURORA 7" CAPSULE - PRE-INSERTION - CAPE

Astronaut Walter Schirra - Removal - Sigma "7" Capsule - USS Kearsage

Closeup View - Sigma "7" Capsule - Recovery Ship

Astronaut Walter Schirra - Removal - Sigma 7 Capsule - USS Kearsage

Astronaut Walter Schirra being removed from his Sigma 7 capsule

Cooper and Capsule on Deck

Apollo Capsule simulator ARC-1963-A-30704

Apollo Capsule simulator - navigation guidance system ARC-1963-A-30702

Apollo Capsule simulator ARC-1963-A-30703

Apollo Capsule simulator ARC-1963-A-30700

Apollo Capsule simulator ARC-1963-A-30701

MERCURY-ATLAS (MA)-9 - LAUNCH - CAPSULE - ASTRONAUT COOPER - CAPE

Shadowgraph: Gemini capsule flight stability study ARC-1963-A-31214

Drawing of proposed Pig Capsule Little Joe first shot

Gemini 3 capsule is mated with Titan.

Sigma 7 capsule on display at the Johnson Space Center

Cicra 1968 - 1969: Biosatellite model with monkey shown in the front of the capsule and the life spport package in the rear. ARC-1968-AR-1632B-452

Apollo 8 capsule hoisted aboard U.S.S. Yorktown

Apollo 8 Capsule being hoisted onto the recovery ship

Apollo 11 - Saturn Apollo Program

The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard were Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, named “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, landed on the Moon. Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Edwin (Buzz) Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. The recovery operation took place in the Pacific Ocean where Navy para-rescue men recovered the capsule housing the 3-man Apollo 11 crew. The crew was airlifted to safety aboard the U.S.S. Hornet, where they were quartered in a Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF). Here the quarantined Apollo 11 crew members (l to r) Armstrong, Collins, and Aldrin, and U.S. President Richard Milhous Nixon share laughs over a comment made by fellow astronaut Frank Borman, Apollo 8 commander. The president was aboard the recovery vessel awaiting return of the astronauts. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished. n/a

The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard were Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, named “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, landed on the Moon. Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Edwin (Buzz) Aldrin.  During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. The recovery operation took place in the Pacific Ocean where Navy para-rescue men recovered the capsule housing the 3-man Apollo 11 crew. The crew was airlifted to safety aboard the U.S.S. Hornet, where they were quartered in a Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF). Here the quarantined Apollo 11 crew members (l to r) Armstrong, Collins, and Aldrin, and U.S. President Richard Milhous Nixon share laughs over a comment made by fellow astronaut Frank Borman, Apollo 8 commander. The president was aboard the recovery vessel awaiting return of the astronauts. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished. n/a
The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard were Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, named “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, landed on the Moon. Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Edwin (Buzz) Aldrin. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. The recovery operation took place in the Pacific Ocean where Navy para-rescue men recovered the capsule housing the 3-man Apollo 11 crew. The crew was airlifted to safety aboard the U.S.S. Hornet, where they were quartered in a Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF). Here the quarantined Apollo 11 crew members (l to r) Armstrong, Collins, and Aldrin, and U.S. President Richard Milhous Nixon share laughs over a comment made by fellow astronaut Frank Borman, Apollo 8 commander. The president was aboard the recovery vessel awaiting return of the astronauts. With the success of Apollo 11, the national objective to land men on the Moon and return them safely to Earth had been accomplished. n/a

Apollo 11 - Saturn Apollo Program

The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched aboard the Saturn V launch vehicle from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins, remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, named “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, landed on the Moon. Armstrong was the first human to ever stand on the lunar surface, followed by Edwin (Buzz) Aldrin. The surface exploration was concluded in 2½ hours. Once the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth, the LM redocked with the CM for the crew’s return to Earth. Following splash down in the Pacific Ocean, Navy para-rescue men recovered the capsule housing the 3-man crew. The crew was airlifted to safety aboard the U.S.S. Hornet, where they were quartered in a Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF). Astronaut Collins took this snapshot of astronauts Armstrong (center) and Aldrin inside of the MQF. n/a

The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard the space craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, named “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, landed on the Moon. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. The recovery operation took place in the Pacific Ocean where Navy para-rescue men recovered the capsule housing the 3-man Apollo 11 crew. The crew was airlifted to safety aboard the U.S.S. Hornet recovery ship, where they were quartered in a Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF) which served as their home for 21 days. In this photo taken at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, the quarantined housing facility is being lowered from the U.S.S. Hornet, onto a trailer for transport to Hickam Field. From there, it was loaded aboard an Air Force C-141 jet and flown back to Ellington Air Force Base Texas, and then on to the NASA Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) Lunar Receiving Laboratory in Houston, Texas. n/a

The Apollo 11 mission, the first manned lunar mission, launched from the Kennedy Space Center, Florida via the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Saturn V launch vehicle on July 16, 1969 and safely returned to Earth on July 24, 1969. Aboard the space craft were astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, commander; Michael Collins, Command Module (CM) pilot; and Edwin E. (Buzz) Aldrin Jr., Lunar Module (LM) pilot. The CM, piloted by Michael Collins remained in a parking orbit around the Moon while the LM, named “Eagle’’, carrying astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, landed on the Moon. During 2½ hours of surface exploration, the crew collected 47 pounds of lunar surface material for analysis back on Earth. The recovery operation took place in the Pacific Ocean where Navy para-rescue men recovered the capsule housing the 3-man Apollo 11 crew. The crew was airlifted to safety aboard the U.S.S. Hornet, where they were quartered in a Mobile Quarantine Facility (MQF) which served as their home until they reached the NASA Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) Lunar Receiving Laboratory in Houston, Texas. On arrival at Ellington Air Force base near the MSC, the crew, still under a 21 day quarantine in the MQF, were greeted by their wives. Pictured here is Joan Aldrin, wife of Buzz Aldrin, speaking with her husband via telephone patch. n/a

Astronaut selectee Major Guion S. Bluford Jr. stands beside the Apollo 15 capsule during a tour of the Air Force Museum

Martin Luther King time capsule that was buried in Pennsylvania Avenue during the 1980s. Washington, D.C.

SSGT David Pierce crawls down the ladder to the combat crew capsule. Pierce is a manager of a missile launch control facility, 91st Strategic Missile Wing, Strategic Air Command