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The vision of Saint Jerome who is asleep in the bottom right, the Virgin and Child appear above being pointed to by Saint John the Baptist

Plate 2: three fragments of friezes; on top, a grotesque head of a man, a skull of a ram at bottom left and a chimera at bottom right, from 'Friezes, foliage, and grotesques' (Frises, feuillages et grotesques)

Combat on a bridge, a horseman and two footsoldiers battle with swords at bottom right, one footsoldier on the ground to left of the horseman, various soldiers with swords on the bridge in the background, French coat of arms displayed in center of bridge, title page of 'Varie figure'

Combat on a bridge, a horseman and two footsoldiers battle with swords at bottom right, one footsoldier on the ground to left of the horseman, various soldiers with swords on the bridge in the background, French coat of arms displayed in center of bridge, title page of 'Varie figure'

Plate 9: five heads, two young women at left, a bearded man at upper right, a young woman and a bearded man at bottom right, from 'The Book for Learning to Draw' (Livre pour apprendre à dessiner)

Plate 9: five heads, two young women at left, a bearded man at upper right, a young woman and a bearded man at bottom right, from 'The Book for Learning to Draw' (Livre pour apprendre à dessiner)

Plate 8: four small heads, a soldier at upper left, a Turk with a turban and beard at upper right, a bearded man in profile at bottom left, a young woman in profile at bottom right, from 'The Book for Learning to Draw' (Livre pour apprendre à dessiner)

[Sac and Fox Indian country, State of Missouri, State of Illinois; bottom right.]

Tipple on mountain side extending from mine opening on upper left to bottom right

[Copy of photographs showing: boys' sports team (upper left); group portrait of men, women, and children (upper right); group portrait of young men gathered around man with camera (bottom left); landscape (bottom center); and boys and men in classroom (bottom right)]

Copy of photographs showing: boys' sports team (upper left); group portrait of men, women, and children (upper right); group portrait of young men gathered around man with camera (bottom left); landscape (bottom center); and boys and men in classroom (bottom right)

Potomac Electric Power Co. Benning plant. Generator unit no. 13 at Benning plant, bottom right 6,7,8

Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing Eight (CVW-8) fly over the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS NIMITZ (CVN 68) during an air show. The aircraft include (right to left) F-14 Tomcats (top right), A-7 Corsair IIs (bottom right), S-3 Viking and A-6 Intruders

An aerial view which includes part of the Naval Base, Subic Bay, the city of Olongapo, bottom right, and the bridge that is built over the canal to join the two communities

MiG-25/Foxbat high altitude supersonic interceptor aircraft. (PHOTO courtesy of Soviet Military Power Magazine, PHOTO #27, Page 33, bottom right)

T-72 main battle tank. (PHOTO courtesy of Soviet Military Power Magazine, PHOTO #20, Page 29, bottom right)

An air-to-air top view of U.S. and Egyptian aircraft in formation during the joint exercise Bright Star '83. The aircraft (clockwise from bottom right) are an Egyptian F-4 Phantom II, Mirage 2000, MiG-17, American A-6 Intruder, Egyptian MiG-15, American A-7 Corsair II, Egyptian MiG-21, Egyptian F-16B Fighting Falcon, and an American F-14 Tomcat, center

Some of the aircraft of Carrier Air Wing 13 (CVW-13) fly over the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS ABRAHAM LINCOLN (CVN-72) during a dependents day cruise. At bottom left and bottom right are E-2C Hawkeye aircraft; second from bottom on each side are EA-6B Prowler aircraft. F/A-18A Hornet aircraft make up the remainder of the formation

An aerial view of the Portsmouth Naval Hospital complex. At the bottom right is the old original hospital now used for pediatrics. Above that is construction for the new extension and above that is the new hospital. The large building to the right is the new parking garage

An aerial view of the Portsmouth Naval Hospital complex. At the bottom right is the old original hospital now used for pediatrics. To the right of that is the new construction of the massive expansion to the hospital and further to the right is the new parking garage. On the point above that is the present new hospital. The city of Norfolk is just visable at the upper left corner across the Elizabeth River

An aerial view of the Portsmouth Naval Hospital complex. At the bottom right is the old original hospital now used for pediatrics. Above that is construction for the new extension and above that is the new hospital. The large building to the right is the new parking garage

An aerial view of the Norfolk Naval Shipyard located on the Elizabeth River. At the bottom right is the South Gate Annex where ships of the mothball fleet are stored. At left center is the main shipyard. Futher back on the righthand side of the river is the Norfolk Shipbuilding & Drydock Company (NORSHIPCO). The city of Norfolk is in the background

Site aerials of locations where attacks on Stabilization Force (SFOR) troops, in support of Operation JOINT GUARD, have taken place and sites of clashes between Muslim and Croats. The Rondo (round-about) on bottom right is the gathering point for Croatians during conflicts at the cemetery. Spanish Square to the Rondo and the Muslim-Croat cemetery is commonly referred to as the Triangle. JOINT GUARD enforces the Dayton Peace Accords and with multi-national allies continues to monitor the militaries of the former warring factions and provides a climate of stability in the war-torn land of Bosnia-Herzegovina

Aerial port workers at Rinas Airport (bottom right), offload humanitarian supplies from a C-130. They handled up to 450 flights a day during the early part of the operation. AIRMAN Magaine's Article "Shining Hope for Survival" describes an Air Force-led joint task force ensuring that international aid gets to the flood of refugees pouring into Albania. (AIRMAN Magazine/July 1999)

USS REUBEN JAMES (FFG 57) (bottom left) at sea with the Chilean frigate LYNCH (FFG 07) (bottom right) and various patrol boats during maneuvers off the Chilean coast as part of Exercise TEAMWORK SOUTH '99

A poster depiciting various activities of the EC-135 Looking Glass aircraft during the joint military exercise GLOBAL GUARDIAN '98. VIRIN and SDAN for photographers are: top photo - 971103-N-3149V-003, DN-SD-99-05815; middle photo - 971103-N-3149V-004, DN-SD-99-05816; bottom left - none; bottom right - 971103-N-3149V-001, DN-SD-99-05813

Poster depiciting various scenes of the 90th Space Wing during the joint military GLOBAL GUARDIAN '98. VIRIN and SDAN of photographs are: top - 971031-N-4541B-006, DN-SD-99-05806; middle phtos - no VIRIN NOR SDAN; bottom left - 971031-N-4541B-007, DN-SD-99-05807; bottom right - 971031-N-4541B-005, DN-SD-99-05805

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Inside the Vehicle Assembly Building, main engine No. 3 (bottom right) is being removed from Space Shuttle Discovery. Above it are (left) the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) engine, the reaction control thrusters (right), and the OMS pod (top). Last week, Shuttle managers determined that the engine was not acceptable for flight because a half-inch-long broken drill bit is lodged in the engine's coolant cavity. Therefore, the engine is being replaced. The Shuttle is expected to roll out to the pad at 2 a.m. Saturday morning, Nov. 13. The STS-103 launch is now targeted for Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST. The 10-day mission is expected to conclude at KSC on Dec. 16 with a 12:45 a.m. landing KSC-99pp1294

A broad aerial view west of Launch Complex 39 Area shows a multitude of facilities. Starting with the Shuttle Landing Facility, at bottom center is a circle around a windsock, a landing aid for pilots; at bottom right is a portion of the landing strip. In the center is the parking tarmac with its mate/demate device on the left corner. To the right is the remote launch vehicle hangar, still under construction. At the upper right is the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The tow-way road runs from the landing strip to the Orbiter Processing Facility, next to the VAB. The Kennedy Parkway North extends from the left side toward the VAB. The long white building next to the parkway is the Apollo/Saturn V Center. Above it, slightly visible on the horizon (left), is Launch Complex 39, Pad B. KSC-00PP-0437

AIRMAN First Class Dave Garcia (bottom right) and other members of the Joint Processing Accountability Center (JPAC) inprocessing team assist incoming personnel for the Joint Expeditionary Force Experiment (JEFX) at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada. The exercise involves many different units and branches of the military

On Launch Pad 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the canister that surrounded the Mars Odyssey orbiter is moved away. The orbiter is at bottom right. Scheduled to launch 11:02 a.m. EDT April 7, the spacecraft will map the Martian surface in search of geological features that could indicate the presence of water, now or in the past, and may contribute significantly toward understanding what will be necessary for a more sophisticated exploration of Mars KSC01pp0645

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- From vantage points on the Fixed Service Structure (bottom right and left) on Launch Pad 39A, workers and the media look down upon the Mobile Launcher Platform (MLP) at the start of a water sound suppression test. This test is being conducted following the replacement of the six main system valves, which had been in place since the beginning of the Shuttle Program and had reached the end of their service life. Also, the hydraulic portion of the valve actuators has been redesigned and simplified to reduce maintenance costs. The sound suppression water system is installed on the launch pads to protect the orbiter and its payloads from damage by acoustical energy reflected from the MLP during launch. The system includes an elevated water tank with a capacity of 300,000 gallons. The tank is 290 feet high and stands on the northeast side of the Pad. The water is released just before the ignition of the orbiter's three main engines and twin solid rocket boosters, and flows through parallel 7-foot-diameter pipes to the Pad area. KSC-04pd1072

A USAF F-16 Fighting Falcon aircraft from the 56th Fighter Wing (FW) prepare to taxi out at the flight line with the help of a USAF aircraft crew chief (bottom right) from the 308th Aircraft Maintenance Unit (AMXU) at Luke Air Force Base (AFB), Arizona (AZ) before a training sortie. The mission of the 56th FW is to train F-16 pilots and crew chiefs while providing agile combat support to aerospace expeditionary forces

Aviation Structural Mechanic 2nd Class Carlos Ayala, bottom right, conducts routine maintenance on an SH-60F Seahawk helicopter following a recent inspection on board Naval Air Station North Island, Calif.

US Marine Corps (USMC) Sergeant (SGT) Edward Beattie (top left) grabs the outboard end of a USMC Sikorsky CH-46E Sea Knight Helicopter rotor blade while USMC Lance Corporal (LCPL) Justin Leonard (bottom right) holds the inboard end of the rotor blade. USMC LCPL David Noble (middle) and USMC Corporal (CPL) Sedric Gullett (behind blade) stand by ready to assist. These four Marines are with Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron 264 (HMM-264) and are replacing the rotor blade of the CH-46E at the airstrip in Al Asad, Al Anbar Province, Iraq, during Operation IRAQI FREEDOM

US Navy (USN) Boatswain's Mate Third Class (BM3) Hiroaki Fujita (bottom right) from the Assault Craft Unit 1 (ACU-1), Detachment Western Pacific, Fleet Activities Sasebo, Japan, gives local Thai media a tour in the well deck of USN Dock Landing Ship (LSD) USS HARPERS FERRY (LSD 49) during the annual US/Thai EXERCISE COBRA GOLD 2006 in the Gulf of Thailand (THA). COBRA GOLD is a combined annual joint training exercise aimed at developing interoperability, strengthening relationships between services and developing cross-cultural understanding among participating nations

Chief Electrician�s Mate Charles Moody, top right, looks on as Electronics Technician Seaman Recruit Steven Jones, bottom right, and Electronics Technician 3rd Class Matt Oliger feed lines to crew members.

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In clean room C of Astrotech's Payload Processing Facility, a worker wearing a "bunny suit," or clean-room attire, looks over the Dawn spacecraft after removing the protective cover, at bottom right. In the clean room, the spacecraft will undergo further processing. Dawn's mission is to explore two of the asteroid belt's most intriguing and dissimilar occupants: asteroid Vesta and the dwarf planet Ceres. The Dawn mission is managed by JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington, D.C. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton KSC-07pd0863

Live video from the International Space Station is shown on the screen in the Russian Mission Control Center in Korolev, outside Moscow, October 12, 2007. Expedition 16 Commander Peggy Whitson (bottom right), Soyuz Commander and Flight Engineer Yuri Malenchenko (bottom center) and Malaysian Spaceflight Participant Sheikh Muszaphar Shukor (bottom left) docked their Soyuz TMA-11 spacecraft to the station at 10:50 a.m. EDT. Oct. 12, 2007. (top left to right) Expedition 15 Commander Fyodor Yurchikhin and Flight Engineers Oleg Kotov and Clay Anderson welcomed the new crew aboard the station when the hatches were opened at 12:22p.m. EDT. Both crews will work together for about nine days before Yurchikhin, Kotov and Shukor depart in their Soyuz TMA-10 spacecraft. Photo Credit: "NASA/Bill Ingalls" 07pd2861

Korolev, Russia -- Live video from the Soyuz TMA-11 spacecraft of the International Space Station is shown on the screen in the Russian Mission Control Center in Korolev, outside Moscow Oct. 12, 2007. Expedition 16 Commander Peggy Whitson (bottom right), Soyuz Commander and Flight Engineer Yuri Malenchenko (bottom center) and Malaysian Spaceflight Participant Sheikh Muszaphar Shukor (bottom left) docked their Soyuz TMA-11 spacecraft to the station at 10:50 a.m. EDT Oct. 12, 2007. From top left to right, Expedition 15 Commander Fyodor Yurchikhim and Flight Engineers Oleg Kotov and Clay Anderson welcomed the new crew aboard the station when the hatches were opened at 12:22 p.m. EDT. Both crews fill work together for about nine days before Yurchikhin, Kotov and Shukor depart in their Soyuz TMA-10 spacecraft. Photo credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls KSC-07pd2861

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, STS-128 Mission Specialists John "Danny" Olivas (top right) and Christer Fugelsang (bottom right) inspect ammonia tanks, part of the payload for their mission. Members of the STS-128 crew are at Kennedy for a crew equipment interface test, or CEIT, which provides hands-on training and observation of shuttle and flight hardware. The STS-128 flight will carry science and storage racks to the International Space Station on space shuttle Discovery. The STS-128 mission is targeted to launch on Aug. 6. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann KSC-2009-3541

JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, Houston - JSC2010-E-079335 -- To celebrate the upcoming 30th anniversary and retirement of the Space Shuttle Program, the design of this patch aims to capture the visual essence and spirit of the program in an iconic and triumphant manner. As the Space Shuttle Program has been an innovative, iconic gem in the history of American spaceflight, the overall shape of the patch and its faceted panels are reminiscent of a diamond or other fine jewel. The shape of the patch fans out from a fine point at the bottom to a wide array across the top, to evoke the vastness of space and our aim to explore it, as the shuttle has done successfully for decades. The outlined blue circle represents the shuttle's exploration within low Earth orbit, but also creates a dynamic fluidity from the bottom right around to the top left to allude to the smoothness of the shuttle orbiting Earth. The diagonal lines cascading down into the top-right corner of the design form the American Flag as the shuttle has been one of the most recognizable icons in American history throughout the last three decades. In the top left and right panels of the design, there are seven prominent stars on each side, which represent the 14 crew members who were lost on shuttles Challenger and Columbia. Inside of the middle panel to the right of the shuttle, there are five larger, more prominent stars that signify the five space shuttle vehicles NASA has had in its fleet throughout the program. Most importantly though, this patch is as an overall celebration of the much-beloved program and vehicle that so many people have dedicated themselves to in so many capacities throughout the years with a sense of vibrancy and mysticism that the Space Shuttle Program will always be remembered by. This patch was designed by Aerospace Engineer Blake Dumesnil, who has supported the Space Shuttle Program with his work in the Avionics and Energy Systems Divisions of the NASA Johnson Space Center Engineering Directorate. It is the winning entry in a commemorative patch design contest sponsored by the Space Shuttle Program. Image credit: NASA/Blake Dumesnil KSC-2010-4649

JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, Houston - JSC2010-E-079335 -- To celebrate the upcoming 30th anniversary and retirement of the Space Shuttle Program, the design of this patch aims to capture the visual essence and spirit of the program in an iconic and triumphant manner. As the Space Shuttle Program has been an innovative, iconic gem in the history of American spaceflight, the overall shape of the patch and its faceted panels are reminiscent of a diamond or other fine jewel. The shape of the patch fans out from a fine point at the bottom to a wide array across the top, to evoke the vastness of space and our aim to explore it, as the shuttle has done successfully for decades. The outlined blue circle represents the shuttle's exploration within low Earth orbit, but also creates a dynamic fluidity from the bottom right around to the top left to allude to the smoothness of the shuttle orbiting Earth. The diagonal lines cascading down into the top-right corner of the design form the American Flag as the shuttle has been one of the most recognizable icons in American history throughout the last three decades. In the top left and right panels of the design, there are seven prominent stars on each side, which represent the 14 crew members who were lost on shuttles Challenger and Columbia. Inside of the middle panel to the right of the shuttle, there are five larger, more prominent stars that signify the five space shuttle vehicles NASA has had in its fleet throughout the program. Most importantly though, this patch is as an overall celebration of the much-beloved program and vehicle that so many people have dedicated themselves to in so many capacities throughout the years with a sense of vibrancy and mysticism that the Space Shuttle Program will always be remembered by. This patch was designed by Aerospace Engineer Blake Dumesnil, who has supported the Space Shuttle Program with his work in the Avionics and Energy Systems Divisions of the NASA Johnson Space Center Engineering Directorate. It is the winning entry in a commemorative patch design contest sponsored by the Space Shuttle Program. Image credit: NASA/Blake Dumesnil KSC-2010-4649
JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, Houston - JSC2010-E-079335 -- To celebrate the upcoming 30th anniversary and retirement of the Space Shuttle Program, the design of this patch aims to capture the visual essence and spirit of the program in an iconic and triumphant manner. As the Space Shuttle Program has been an innovative, iconic gem in the history of American spaceflight, the overall shape of the patch and its faceted panels are reminiscent of a diamond or other fine jewel. The shape of the patch fans out from a fine point at the bottom to a wide array across the top, to evoke the vastness of space and our aim to explore it, as the shuttle has done successfully for decades. The outlined blue circle represents the shuttle's exploration within low Earth orbit, but also creates a dynamic fluidity from the bottom right around to the top left to allude to the smoothness of the shuttle orbiting Earth. The diagonal lines cascading down into the top-right corner of the design form the American Flag as the shuttle has been one of the most recognizable icons in American history throughout the last three decades. In the top left and right panels of the design, there are seven prominent stars on each side, which represent the 14 crew members who were lost on shuttles Challenger and Columbia. Inside of the middle panel to the right of the shuttle, there are five larger, more prominent stars that signify the five space shuttle vehicles NASA has had in its fleet throughout the program. Most importantly though, this patch is as an overall celebration of the much-beloved program and vehicle that so many people have dedicated themselves to in so many capacities throughout the years with a sense of vibrancy and mysticism that the Space Shuttle Program will always be remembered by. This patch was designed by Aerospace Engineer Blake Dumesnil, who has supported the Space Shuttle Program with his work in the Avionics and Energy Systems Divisions of the NASA Johnson Space Center Engineering Directorate. It is the winning entry in a commemorative patch design contest sponsored by the Space Shuttle Program. Image credit: NASA/Blake Dumesnil KSC-2010-4649

Fire Controlman 1st Class Robert Watterson, bottom right, and Gunner's Mate 3rd Class Justin Pruett, bottom left, fire an M-14 rifle

ISS028-E-049098 (14 Sept. 2011) --- In the Unity node, Expedition 28 crew members add the Expedition 28 patch to the growing collection of insignias representing crews who have worked on the International Space Station. Pictured are Russian cosmonaut Andrey Borisenko (bottom right), commander; Russian cosmonaut Alexander Samokutyaev (top) and NASA astronaut Ron Garan, both flight engineers. iss028e049098

ISS028-E-049090 (14 Sept. 2011) --- In the Unity node, Expedition 28 crew members add the Expedition 28 patch to the growing collection of insignias representing crews who have worked on the International Space Station. Pictured are Russian cosmonaut Andrey Borisenko (bottom right), commander; Russian cosmonaut Alexander Samokutyaev (top) and NASA astronaut Ron Garan, both flight engineers. iss028e049090

Hurricane/Tropical Storm - Waveland, Miss. , Sep. 1, 2012 -- A Community Relations Specialist deployed as part of the new Assess, Inform, Report (AIR) mission that FEMA has implemented gathers information on a critical issue from local officials. The problem was thousands of dead Nutria rodents (one can be seen bottom right) were washed onto the 7 miles of Waveland beach. FEMA/Tim Burkitt

ISS042E329946 (03/11/2015) --- Making preparations for departure of three of his colleagues NASA astronaut Terry Virts, a flight engineer for Expedition 42 on the International Space Station tweeted this image down to his followers on Earth on Mar 11, 2015 with this candid message: "Our last minutes together as #Exp42 crew. It's been a pleasure serving on #ISS with these wonderful people'. Virts is now the Commander of Expedition 43 and his colleagues NASA astronaut Barry Wilmore (bottom right), cosmonaut Elena Serova (top right) and Alexander Samokutyaev ( top center) of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), have all landed safely back on Earth. The remaining crew with Virts in space is ESA (European Space Agency) astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti (bottom center) and cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov (top left). iss042e329946

Commander, Naval Surface Forces Vice Adm. Thomas S. Rowden, bottom right, addresses the crew of the guided-missile destroyer USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53) during an all-hands call at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam.

Seaman Tylor Spagnola, bottom right, from Amsterdam, N.Y., and Seaman Jack Downs, from Brick, N.J., paint the hull of the amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6).

Cmdr. Jason R. Stumpf, bottom right, the air officer aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Bonhomme Richard (LHD 6), gives a tour of the ship's flight deck.

The Egyptian navy frigate El Zafer (F951), bottom right, conducts a passing exercise with the guided-missile destroyer USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109).

The guided-missile destroyer USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109), bottom-right, conducts a passing exercise with the Egyptian navy frigate El Zafer (F951).

Capt. Putnam Browne, top right, commanding officer of USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), Capt. Amy Baurenschmidt, bottom right, executive officer, and other command leaders meet with inspectors for the supply department's Ney inspection.

Rolling Airframe Missile RIM-116A into the aft launcher