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Water running weir river.

Barrage du Nil, près du Caire (Égypte) / Bonfils.

Egyptian views; The barrage. General view of the barrage looking E. along the top

Egyptian views; The barrage. Near view of the barrage from the E.

Barrage, F R - Age: [Blank], Year: [BLANK] - Mississippi Fifth Battalion, Infantry AND Fifth Infantry (State Troops), A-D

Smoke barrage at Dunkerque, Belgium

Sgts. MacIsaac and Cairola. American Pioneers who brought in a wounded officer through a barrage. Near Peronne, France. 12-5-1917

Drills - Artillery - Field - Firing - Men of the 326th Regiment. Field Artillery practicing barrage firing. Camp Taylor, Louisville, Kentucky

Runners working in a barrage / L. Jonas, 1927.

Iraq. Hindiyah Barrage. About 48 miles S.E. of Baghdad. Front view showing fish thieves in their ghuffa

Iraq. Hindiyah Barrage. About 48 miles S.E. of Baghdad. Row of "Bellums," river boats in foreground

Iraq. Hindiyah Barrage. About 48 miles S.E. of Baghdad. Foaming waters coming through the sluices

Iraq. Hindiyah Barrage. About 48 miles S.E. of Baghdad. Picturesque river boats elaborately painted

Iraq. Hindiyah Barrage. About 48 miles S.E. of Baghdad. Below the dam looking across the water

Iraq. Hindiyah Barrage. About 48 miles S.E. of Baghdad looking along the river dam

Cairo and district, Egypt. Fishermen below the barrage casting their circular nets into the swift current

Ready to testify. E.W. O'Brien, left and R.P. Herron, utility representatives being sworn in Thursday at the Senate lobby investigation. Both men are implicated in the anti-holding company bill "telephone directory wire" barrage that flooded Capitol Hill

Barrage balloons, Parris Island, S.C.

Marine Corps barrage balloons, Parris Island, S.C.

U.S. Marine Corps, bedding down a big barrage balloon, Parris Island, S.C.

Marine Corps barrage balloons, Parris Island, S.C.

Barrage balloons, Parris Island, S.C.

Parris Island, S.C., barrage balloon

Barrage balloon, Parris Island, S.C.

Marine Corps barrage balloons, Parris Island, S.C.

Marine Corps barrage balloons, Parris Island, S.C.

Marine Corps barrage balloons, Parris Island, S.C.

Barrage balloon, Parris Island, S.C.

Barrage balloon, Parris Island, S.C.

Marine Corps barrage balloons, Parris Island, S.C.

Barrage balloon, Parris Island, S.C.

Barrage balloons, Parris Island, S.C.

Marine Corps barrage balloon, Parris Island, S.C.

Barrage balloon, Parris Island, S.C.

Marine Corps barrage balloons, Parris Island, S.C.

Balloon barrage training center. Lilluputians at a weemie roast. This illustration is portrayed here by comparing the huge balloons and dwarfed trainees seated in picnic fashion around their instructor. Camp Tyson, Tennessee

Balloon barrage training center. Aerial octopus. This strange looking creature is a tail view of one of the barrage balloons prompting the above title. The lower fin is filled with gas last as it is slowly raised from the ground. Camp Tyson, Tennessee

Barrage balloon manufacture. Assembling the balloon. These workers are ready to fasten one-half of a barrage balloon to the other half--the final major step in the assembly of the huge balloon. After this is done, all accessories, ropes and rigging will have to be added before the balloon can be tested, finally inspected, packed and shipped to Uncle Sam. General Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio

Barrage balloon manufacture. Seamers at work. Putting rubber cement on both surfaces which are to be fastened together, these workers assemble individual pattern pieces into strips or "gores" for barrage balloons being made for army balloon corps. By an ingenious arrangement of folds, strips nearly a hundred feet long can be handled by each worker on the table in front of him. General Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio

Barrage balloon manufacture. Reinforcing the fins of a fish-of-the-air. These workers at the barrage balloon division, are putting double reinforcements on the right fin of a completed barrage balloon before it is deflated and sent to army training camps Every seam must be absolutely gas- and air-tight, since the tiniest pinhole would permit valuable amounts of precious helium to escape. General Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio

Barrage balloon manufacture. All out for defense! Scrambling out of the zipper-covered "manhole" in the nose of a gigantic barrage balloon, this worker has finished patching, touching up and checking the great bag, and is ready to give the signal to deflate the balloon, pack it and ship it to Uncle Sam's army training fields where balloon squadrons are learning the technique of handling the blimp-sized gas bags. This ship is of the ballonet type. General Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio

Barrage balloon manufacture. Fin-shaping cords. These workers are inside the rear-right horizontal fin of a barrage balloon, checking the ropes which give the fin shape and hold it together. Since barrage balloons are non-rigid and entirely collapsible, these ropes come closest to being the "back-bone" for the gigantic "defenders of cities." General Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio

Barrage balloon manufacture. Fitting a manhold vent in the sidewall of a barrage balloon. These workers are putting in the final pieces of equipment on a completed barrage balloon, just prior to its deflation, packing and shipping to an army air base. In the foreground is a balloon ready for test inflation with air which will also be inspected during inflation. General Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio

Barrage balloon manufacture. Making a suspension band. These workers are preparing a reinforced band which will be attached longitudinally around the barrage balloon. This band carries most of the rigging by which the balloon is controlled from the ground. General Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio

Barrage balloon manufacture. Getting supplies at the storehouse. This barrage balloon builder has come to the company's storehouse to obtain more reinforcing tape to fasten the seams of a barrage balloon. Small, but vital to production, every piece of material must pass over this counter and be recorded before issuance. The storekeeper is the only man who knows the secret formula for mixing the rubber cement combination which works most effectively in making air-tight seams. General Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio

Barrage balloon manufacture. Spider and the flies. Putting last touches on a completed barrage balloon are these workers and their supervisor (standing). To inspect the bag for leaks, the light inside is turned off, leaving the workers in a midnight gloom. Then a co-worker on the outside takes a bright light, and works along the length of the entire balloon, back and forth, until he has covered every inch. The tiniest pinhole shines forth like a bright star in the sky, and these alert inspectors spot it and repair it. Cloth moccasins are worn inside the bag, or else stocking feet--to avoid chafing the fabric. General Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio

Barrage balloon manufacture. Birthplace for air-whales--gigantic barrage balloons which look like monster whales-of-the-air, made in this huge room. Four are seen here: left rear is a balloon being folded into the shipping container at the extreme rear; next to it is an inflated balloon on which final inspection and checking is now complete, and ready for deflation and packing; at the right is a completed balloon in the process of being inflated for inspection; in the foreground is an assembled balloon awaiting final fitting and inflation. General Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio

Barrage balloon manufacture. John and his colleagues. Silhouetted against the spiderweb pattern of the inside of a great barrage balloon, this supervisor watches "balloon tailors" at work on an inside seam. The area in the picture will be filled with helium in service. General Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio

Barrage balloon manufacture. Tugging a finished half of a barrage balloon into position for joining with the other half. These workers have come to the final assembly step in producing barrage balloons for American air defense. Four steps in final production are shown in this photo: the half-balloon they are dragging in; the nose of a ship on the right which is in the process of being deflated for packing and shipping; and the inflated balloon in the background which is being inspected for final okay before being shipped. General Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio

Barrage balloon manufacture. Rubber tailor shop. Using a tailor's electric cutter--a speedup suggestion from one of the young workers--these workers slice through several thicknesses of rubber fabric as they cut the patterns for the strips and "gores" for making barrage balloons. Marked, cut, assembled and seamed on long tables, the strips are taken from the tables to the assembly floor to be fashioned into a gigantic gas balloon for the protection of our cities. General Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio

Barrage balloon manufacture. Glove for a gas bag. Fitting the outstretched fingers of a fabric patch to the side of a barrage balloon, this worker must be extremely careful to put the patch on smoothly. Any wrinkles might bind, pinch or chafe and cause leaks. Sewn and seamed inside this "glove" is a webbing of rope which will become part of the rigging which controls the giant balloon as it flies thousands of feet above cities, arsenals, or other bomber objectives. General Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio

Barrage balloon manufacture. Folding instructions. Supervisor Howard Swires instructs a worker at barrage balloon department in the technique of folding fabric patterns to make efficient use of all working space. General Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio

Barrage balloon manufacture. Reinforcing tail rigging of a new ballonet type barrage balloon, these workers at the barrage plant are cementing, seaming and rolling reinforcing tape across points in the tail and fins where strain is greatest. General Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio

Barrage balloon manufacture. Lineup of cementers. Assembling patterns into gores which in turn are assembled into balloon sections, these workers are charged with making seams strong and gas-tight, since the full tug of gas from the inside, and rigging on the outside is exerted on these sections. General Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio

Barrage balloon manufacture. Final patching and tying. Men in the foreground are rolling cemented patches into correct position on the outside walls of a barrage balloon, while their co-worker in the background is checking the wrapping of ropes in cloth to prevent any stray bristles from puncturing the rubberized fabric. General Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio

Fill 'er up! Tugging at the large hose, known as the "inflation sleeve", this worker stands inside the "manhole" of a new barrage balloon to guide the sleeve into the opening through which it will pump air to test the giant rubber balloon for leaks. General Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio

Barrage balloon manufacture. Handling ropes and fingers. Frayed ropes are attached to the rubberized fabric "fingers" by sewing and cementing to give maximum "grip" on the balloon. Such ropes are fastened to the ground cable which controls the height and flight of the balloon. General Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio

Barrage balloon manufacture. Rope work. Splicing and handling ropes is a vital part of barrage balloon manufacture, and requires unusual skill to make ropes lie smoothly, pull uniformly, avoid chafing the fabric, or bunching after the balloon is fully inflated. An early step in the work is shown here, in which the rope is frayed out into its many strands, which are then cemented into fabric "fingers" for greatest holding power. General Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio

Barrage balloon manufacture. Neck and neck in the stretch. Appearing like race horses galloping down each side of a long strip of barrage balloon fabric, the worker with the scissors apparently finishing ahead of the fellow with the electric fabric cutter. Actually the scissors are not used for cutting, but for "touch up clipping" only, since the power cutter is so much faster. After these men have cut the patterns, the pieces are sent to "seamers" who assemble the individual pattern pieces into strips of "gores," which in turn are assembled into completed barrage balloons. General Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio

Barrage balloon manufacture. Cementing with a paint brush. This worker is a fabric cementer busy applying a rigging patch to the side of a new barrage balloon. Although the fabric looks mussed at the moment, it will be stretched tight and smooth when the new piece of fabric is added. Seams are triple protected against leaks, folded over, cement-welded, taped on both sides with overlapping rubber adhesive tape. Such seams will never pull apart under pressure. General Tire and Rubber Company, Akron, Ohio

Parris Island, South Carolina. Special United States Marine units in training bedding down a big barrage balloon

Parris Island, South Carolina. Special Marine units in training at Parris Island are learning how to bed down a big barrage balloon

Parris Island, South Carolina. Special United States Marine units in training bedding down a big barrage balloon

Parris Island, South Carolina. Tactical formations of barrage balloons prevent dive bombing and the strafing of important ground installations. The Leathernecks are developing an excellent technique in this method of protecting important locations from enemy aircrafts

Parris Island, South Carolina. U.S. Marine Corps glider detachment training camp. A barrage balloon takes to the air under capable handling by a Marine Corps ground crew

Parris Island. Marine Corps barrage balloons. The Marines have the situation well in hand. That goes for everything they tackle -- like this barrage balloon, for example. The special Marine Corps units at Parris Island, South Carolina gain proficiency with this new fighting tool that the leathernecks have taken over

Parris Island. Marine Corps barrage balloons. Bedding down a big barrage balloon is just another job that the leathernecks take in stride as special marine units are trained at Parris Island, South Carolina. "Purging" it with fresh gas before it goes aloft again and running it up into a tactical formation under control of a steel cable are other features of a technique at which the marines have become very proficient

Parris Island, South Carolina. U.S. Marine Corps glider detachment training camp. A barrage balloon takes to the air under capable handling by a Marine Corps ground crew

Parris Island. Marine Corps barrage balloons. The leathernecks get a new job and, as usual, handle it well. A barrage balloon ready to go aloft under the handling of special marine units in training at Parris Island, South Carolina

Parris Island. Marine Corps barrage balloons. Putting the Indian sign on Axis dive bombers and strafing planes. This barrage balloon, under control of a Marine unit in training at Parris Island, South Carolina is part of a plane trap that protects important ground installations. Planes cannot come close to a number of these balloons swaying in tactical formation, with steel cables trailing, without the danger of shearing off wings

Parris Island. Marine Corps barrage balloons. Bedding down a big barrage balloon is just another job that the leathernecks take in stride as special marine units are trained at Parris Island, South Carolina. "Purging" it with fresh gas before it goes aloft again and running it up into a tactical formation under control of a steel cable are other features of a technique at which the marines have become very proficient

Parris Island. Marine Corps barrage balloons. A couple of husky marines and the ground tackle of a barrage balloon don't take long getting acquainted. Special Marine Corps units in training at Parris Island, South Carolina add balloon barrage technique to their large repertoire of fighting methods

Parris Island. Marine Corps barrage balloons. A couple of husky marines and the ground tackle of a barrage balloon don't take long getting acquainted. Special Marine Corps units in training at Parris Island, South Carolina add balloon barrage technique to their large repertoire of fighting methods

Parris Island. Marine Corps barrage balloons. When a husky leatherneck throws his weight on a line, things come his way. A member of a marine balloon barrage unit in training at Parris Island, South Carolina helps to ground one of the big bags that the Corps has added to its kit of fighting tools

Parris Island. Marine Corps barrage balloons. Setting up balloon barrages is just another chore for the versatile marines. Special units in training at Parris Island, South Carolina handle the big bag with customary marine snap and precision

Parris Island. Marine Corps barrage balloons. The leathernecks get a new job and, as usual, handle it well. A barrage balloon ready to go aloft under the handling of special marine units in training at Parris Island, South Carolina

Parris Island, South Carolina. U.S. Marine Corps glider detachment training camp. Running up the barrage balloon

Parris Island. Marine Corps barrage balloons. Another stopper for the Axis. Sections of a marine balloon barrage over Paris Island, South Carolina. The swaying balloons with their trailing cables and steel winch lines make dive bombing and ground strafing of important locations too costly in planes and crews

Parris Island, South Carolina. Special United States Marine units in training bedding down a big barrage balloon

Parris Island, South Carolina. Special United States Marine units in training bedding down a big barrage balloon

Parris Island, South Carolina. Special Marine units in training at Parris Island are learning how to bed down a big barrage balloon

Parris Island, South Carolina. Tactical formations of barrage balloons prevent dive bombing and the strafing of important ground installations. The Leathernecks are developing an excellent technique in this method of protecting important locations from enemy aircraft

Parris Island. Marine Corps barrage balloons. The leathernecks make a strong medicine against Axis aircraft. Special marine units in training at Parris Island, South Carolina send up part of a tactical formation of barrage balloons that prevent dive bombing and the strafing of important ground installations

Marine Corps barrage balloons. The Marines have the situation well in hand. That goes for anything they tackle -- like this barrage balloon, for example. Special Marine Corps units at Parris Island, South Carolina gain rare proficiency with this new fighting tool that the leathernecks have taken over

Parris Island, South Carolina. U.S. Marine Corps glider detachment training camp. Running up the barrage balloon

Parris Island. Marine Corps barrage balloons. The leathernecks make a strong medicine against Axis aircraft. Special marine units in training at Parris Island, South Carolina send up part of a tactical formation of barrage balloons that prevent dive bombing and the strafing of important ground installations

Parris Island. Marine Corps barrage balloons. Up she goes. A barrage balloon takes to the air under the capable handling of a Marine Corps ground crew at Parris Island, South Carolina. Special marine units assigned to the work have made the balloon barrage an effective method of preventing enemy air attacks on important locations

Parris Island. Marine Corps barrage balloons. Up she goes. A barrage balloon takes to the air under the capable handling of a Marine Corps ground crew at Parris Island, South Carolina. Special marine units assigned to the work have made the balloon barrage an effective method of preventing enemy air attacks on important locations

Parris Island. Marine Corps barrage balloons. Putting the Indian sign on Axis dive bombers and strafing planes. This barrage balloon, under control of a Marine unit in training at Parris Island, South Carolina is part of a plane trap that protects important ground installations. Planes cannot come close to a number of these balloons swaying in tactical formation, with steel cables trailing, without the danger of shearing off wings

Parris Island. Marine Corps barrage balloons. Up she goes. A barrage balloon takes to the air under the capable handling of a Marine Corps ground crew at Parris Island, South Carolina. Special marine units assigned to the work have made the balloon barrage an effective method of preventing enemy air attacks on important locations

Parris Island. Marine Corps barrage balloons. Bedding down a big barrage balloon is just another job that the leathernecks take in stride as special marine units are trained at Parris Island, South Carolina. "Purging" it with fresh gas before it goes aloft again and running it up into a tactical formation under control of a steel cable are other features of a technique at which the marines have become very proficient

Parris Island. Marine Corps barrage balloons. When a husky leatherneck throws his weight on a line, things come his way. A member of a Marine balloon barrage unit in training at Parris Island, South Carolina helps to ground one of the big bags that the Corps has added to its kit of fighting tools

Parris Island, South Carolina. U.S. Marine Corps glider detachment training camp. Running up the barrage balloon into a tactical formation under control of a steelcable, a feature of technique at which the Marines at Parris Island must become proficient

Parris Island. Marine Corps barrage balloons. When a husky leatherneck throws his weight on a line, things come his way. A member of a marine balloon barrage unit in training at Parris Island, South Carolina helps to ground one of the big bags that the Corps has added to its kit of fighting tools

Parris Island, South Carolina. Special United States Marine units in training bedding down a big barrage balloon

Parris Island, South Carolina. Special Marine units in training at Parris Island are learning how to bed down a big barrage balloon

Parris Island, South Carolina. Special United States Marine units in training bedding down a big barrage balloon

Parris Island. Marine Corps barrage balloons. Marines in training at Parris Island, South Carolina add one more fighting trick to the many they already know. These fast, powerful tractors are used for positioning power winches from which tactical formations of barrage balloons are controlled

Parris Island. Marine Corps barrage balloons. Putting the Indian sign on Axis dive bombers and strafing planes. This barrage balloon, under control of a Marine unit in training at Parris Island, South Carolina is part of a plane trap that protects important ground installations. Planes cannot come close to a number of these balloons swaying in tactical formation, with steel cables trailing, without the danger of shearing off wings

Parris Island, South Carolina. U.S. Marine Corps glider detachment training camp. A barrage balloon takes to the air under capable handling by a Marine Corps ground crew