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CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The Apollo 15 crew walks out of the Operations and Checkout Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center before climbing into the Astrovan for the ride out to the launch pad for their flight to the moon. Photo credit: NASA KSC-71PC-569

Greeted by cheers from wellwishers at KSC and eager for their venture into space on the fifth Shuttle-Mir docking mission, the STS-81 astronauts depart the Operations and Checkout Building and board the Astrovan for their 25-minute trip to Launch Pad 39B. Leading the six-member crew is Mission Commander Michael A. Baker, followed by Pilot Brent W. Jett, Jr. Behind them are Mission Specialists John M. Grunsfeld, Jerry Linenger, Peter J. K. "Jeff" Wisoff, and Marsha S. Ivins. Once at the pad, they will take their positions in the crew cabin of the Space Shuttle Atlantis to await a liftoff during a seven-minute window that will open at 4:27 a.m. EST, January 12 KSC-97pc140

Greeted by cheers from wellwishers at KSC and eager for their venture into space on the fifth Shuttle-Mir docking mission, the STS-81 astronauts depart the Operations and Checkout Building on their way to Launch Pad 39B. Leading the six-member crew is Mission Commander Michael A. Baker, followed by Pilot Brent W. Jett, Jr. Behind them are Mission Specialists John M. Grunsfeld, Jerry Linenger, Peter J. K. "Jeff" Wisoff, and Marsha S. Ivins. Their trip to the pad will take about 25 minutes aboard the Astrovan. Once there, they will take their positions in the crew cabin of the Space Shuttle Atlantis to await a liftoff during a seven-minute window that will open at 4:27 a.m. EST, January 12 KSC-97pc141

The STS-94 crew walks out of the Operations and Checkout Building and heads for the Astrovan that will transport them to Launch Pad 39A as KSC employees show their support. Waving to the crowd and leading the way are Mission Commander James D. Halsell, Jr. and Pilot Susan L. Still. Behind Still is Mission Specialist Donald A.Thomas, followed by Mission Specialist Michael L. Gernhardt , Payload Commander Janice Voss, and Payload Specialists Roger K.Crouch and Gregory T. Linteris. During the scheduled 16-day Microgravity Science Laboratory-1 (MSL-1) mission, the Spacelab module will be used to test some of the hardware, facilities and procedures that are planned for use on the International Space Station while the flight crew conducts combustion, protein crystal growth and materials processing experiments. Also onboard is the Hitchhiker Cryogenic Flexible Diode (CRYOFD) experiment payload, which is attached to the right side of Columbia’s payload bay.The Space Shuttle Columbia is scheduled to lift off when the launch window opens at 1:50 p.m. EDT, July 1. The launch window was opened 47 minutes early to improve the opportunity to lift off before Florida summer rain showers reached the space center KSC-97PC958

The STS-85 flight crew walks out of the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building during Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities for that mission to board the Astrovan for the ride to the Space Shuttle Discovery on Launch Pad 39A. Waving to the crowd is Commander Curtis L. Brown, Jr. (right). Directly behind him are Payload Commander N. Jan Davis and Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson. Pilot Kent V. Rominger (to Brown’s right) is leading the second row, followed by Payload Specialist Bjarni V. Tryggvason and Mission Specialist Robert L. Curbeam, Jr. The primary payload aboard the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery is the Cryogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescopes for the Atmosphere-2 (CRISTA-SPAS-2). Other payloads on the 11-day mission include the Manipulator Flight Demonstration (MFD), and Technology Applications and Science-1 (TAS-1) and International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker-2 (IEH-2) experiments KSC-97PC1103

The STS-85 flight crew greets a crowd of well-wishers as they walk out of the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building to board the Astrovan for their ride to Launch Pad 39A, where they will take their places aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery. Waving to the crowd is Commander Curtis L. Brown, Jr.(right), followed by Payload Commander N. Jan Davis, Mission Specialist Robert L. Curbeam, Jr., Pilot Kent V. Rominger, Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson and Payload Specialist Bjarni V. Tryggvason. The primary payload aboard the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery is the Cryogenic Infrared Spectrometers and Telescopes for the Atmosphere-Shuttle Pallet Satellite-2 (CRISTA-SPAS-2) free-flyer. Other payloads on the 11-day mission include the Manipulator Flight Demonstration (MFD), and Technology Applications and Science-1 (TAS-1) and International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker-2 (IEH-2) experiments KSC-97PC1200

The STS-89 crew walk out of the Operations and Checkout Building and head for the Astrovan that will transport them to Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Endeavour awaits to take them to Russia’s Mir space station. Waving to the crowd and leading the way, from front to back, left to right, are Pilot Joe Edwards Jr., Commander Terrence Wilcutt, and Mission Specialists Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D., Michael Anderson, Salizhan Sharipov of the Russian Space Agency, Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., and James Reilly, Ph.D. STS-89, slated for a 9:48 p.m. EST liftoff Jan. 22, is the eighth docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Endeavour (all previous dockings were made by Atlantis), and the first launch of 1998. After docking with Mir, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D KSC-98pc214

STS-89 Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., smiles and waves his Australian hat to the crowd outside of the Operations and Checkout Building at KSC as he heads toward the Astrovan that will transport him to Launch Pad 39A. There, the Space Shuttle Endeavour awaits to take the STS-89 crew to Russia’s Mir space station, where Dr. Thomas, who was born and educated in South Australia, will succeed David Wolf, M.D. STS-89, slated for a 9:48 p.m. EST liftoff Jan. 22, is the eighth docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Endeavour (all previous dockings were made by Atlantis), and the first launch of 1998 KSC-98pc215

The STS-89 crew walk out of the Operations and Checkout Building and head for the Astrovan that will transport them to Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Endeavour awaits to take them to Russia’s Mir space station. Waving to the crowd and leading the way, from front to back, left to right, are Pilot Joe Edwards Jr., Commander Terrence Wilcutt, and Mission Specialists Bonnie Dunbar, Ph.D., Michael Anderson, Salizhan Sharipov of the Russian Space Agency, Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., and James Reilly, Ph.D. STS-89, slated for a 9:48 p.m. EST liftoff Jan. 22, is the eighth docking with the Russian Space Station Mir, the first Mir docking for Endeavour (all previous dockings were made by Atlantis), and the first launch of 1998. After docking with Mir, Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Ph.D., will transfer to the space station, succeeding David Wolf, M.D KSC-98pc213

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Greeted by cheers from wellwishers at KSC and eager for their venture into space on the Neurolab mission, the STS-90 astronauts depart the Operations and Checkout Building on their way to Launch Pad 39B. Leading the seven-member crew is Mission Commander Richard Searfoss (far right), with Pilot Scott Altman by his side. Behind Altman are Mission Specialist Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., (waving) with the Canadian Space Agency, and Mission Specialist Kathryn (Kay) Hire. Behind Hire is Mission Specialist Richard Linnehan, D.V.M., and next to Linnehan is Payload Specialist Jay Buckey, M.D. At the rear behind Linnehan is Payload Specialist James Pawelczyk, Ph.D. Their trip to the pad will take about 25 minutes aboard the Astrovan. Once there, they will take their positions in the crew cabin of the Space Shuttle Columbia to await a liftoff during a two-and-a-half hour window that will open at 2:19 p.m. EDT KSC-98pc495

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Greeted by cheers from wellwishers at KSC and eager for their venture into space on the Neurolab mission, the STS-90 astronauts depart the Operations and Checkout Building on their way to Launch Pad 39B. The seven-member crew include (front to back, right to left) Mission Commander Richard Searfoss; Pilot Scott Altman; Mission Specialists Kathryn (Kay) Hire, Dafydd (Dave) Williams, M.D., with the Canadian Space Agency, and Richard Linnehan, D.V.M.; and Payload Specialists James Pawelczyk, Ph.D., and Jay Buckey, M.D. Their trip to the pad will take about 25 minutes aboard the Astrovan. Once there, they will take their positions in the crew cabin of the Space Shuttle Columbia to await a liftoff during a two-and-a-half hour window that will open at 2:19 p.m. EDT. KSC-98pc494

With an enthusiastic crowd of KSC workers wishing them a safe journey, the STS-91 crew walks out from the crew quarters in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building for their trip to Launch Pad 39A. Leading the group to the Astrovan are Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt (left) and Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. Pilot Dominic L. Gorie is directly behind Precourt, while Mission Specialists Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Janet Lynn Kavandi and Valery Victorovitch Ryumin are behind Lawrence. STS-91 is scheduled to be launched on June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will feature the ninth and final Shuttle docking with the Russian space station Mir, the first Mir docking for Discovery, the first on-orbit test of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), and the first flight of the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. Astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas will be returning to Earth as a STS-91 crew member after living more than four months aboard Mir KSC-98pc680

With an enthusiastic crowd of KSC workers wishing them a safe journey, the STS-91 crew walks out from the crew quarters in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building for their trip to Launch Pad 39A. Leading the group to the Astrovan are Mission Commander Charles J. Precourt (left) and Mission Specialist Wendy B. Lawrence. Pilot Dominic L. Gorie is directly behind Precourt, while Mission Specialists Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, Janet Lynn Kavandi and Valery Victorovitch Ryumin are behind Lawrence. STS-91 is scheduled to be launched on June 2 with a launch window opening around 6:10 p.m. EDT. The mission will feature the ninth and final Shuttle docking with the Russian space station Mir, the first Mir docking for Discovery, the first on-orbit test of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS), and the first flight of the new Space Shuttle super lightweight external tank. Astronaut Andrew S. W. Thomas will be returning to Earth as a STS-91 crew member after living more than four months aboard Mir KSC-98pc679

The STS-95 crew leave the Operations and Checkout Building in their flight suits for their trip to Launch Pad 39B. Leading the group to the Astrovan for the ride to Launch Pad 39B is Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. (far right) next to Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai (left), with the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA). Behind them are (2nd row) Pilot Steven W. Lindsey (left) and Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr. (right), senator from Ohio; (3rd row) Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski (left) and Pedro Duque of Spain (right), with the European Space Agency; and Mission Specialist Stephen K. Robinson at the rear. Targeted for launch at 2 p.m. EST on Oct. 29, the mission is expected to last 8 days, 21 hours and 49 minutes, and return to KSC at 11:49 a.m. EST on Nov. 7. The STS-95 mission includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process KSC-98pc1440

After leaving the Operations and Checkout Building, the STS-95 crew wave at well-wishers as they approach the Astrovan they will board for their trip to Launch Pad 39B. Leading the group is Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. (far right); Other crew members are (left to right) Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski , Stephen K. Robinson, Pilot Steven W. Lindsey, Mission Specialist Pedro Duque of Spain (hidden), with the European Space Agency (ESA), Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai, with the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA), and Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr. Targeted for launch at 2 p.m. EST on Oct. 29, the mission is expected to last 8 days, 21 hours and 49 minutes, and return to KSC at 11:49 a.m. EST on Nov. 7. The STS-95 mission includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process KSC-98pc1442

After leaving the Operations and Checkout Building, the STS-95 crew approach the Astrovan for their trip to Launch Pad 39B. Leading the group is Mission Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. (far right), waving to the media and well-wishers; next him is Payload Specialist Chiaki Mukai (left), with the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA). Behind them are (2nd row) Pilot Steven W. Lindsey (left) and Payload Specialist John H. Glenn Jr. (right), senator from Ohio; (3rd row) Mission Specialists Scott E. Parazynski , Stephen K. Robinson and Pedro Duque of Spain (right), with the European Space Agency. Targeted for launch at 2 p.m. EST on Oct. 29, the mission is expected to last 8 days, 21 hours and 49 minutes, and return to KSC at 11:49 a.m. EST on Nov. 7. The STS-95 mission includes research payloads such as the Spartan solar-observing deployable spacecraft, the Hubble Space Telescope Orbital Systems Test Platform, the International Extreme Ultraviolet Hitchhiker, as well as the SPACEHAB single module with experiments on space flight and the aging process KSC-98pc1441

After leaving the Operations and Checkout Building, the STS-88 crew approach the Astrovan for their trip to Launch Pad 39A. In the back row are (left to right) Mission Specialist Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev, a Russian cosmonaut, and Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross and James H. Newman. In the front row (left to right) are Pilot Frederick W. "Rick" Sturckow, Mission Specialist Nancy J. Currie and Commander Robert D. Cabana. STS-88 is expected to launch at 3:56 a.m. EST with the six-member crew aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour on Dec. 3. Endeavour carries the Unity connecting module, which the crew will be mating with the Russian-built Zarya control module already in orbit. In addition to Unity, two small replacement electronics boxes are on board for possible repairs to Zarya batteries. The mission is expected to last 11 days, 19 hours and 49 minutes, with landing at 10:17 p.m. EST on Dec. 14 KSC-98pc1764

The STS-93 crew wave to onlookers as they walk to the "Astrovan," which will transport them to Launch Pad 39-B and liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (starting at rear, left to right) Mission Specialists Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.), and Mission Specialist Stephen A. Hawley (Ph.D.); Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby; and Commander Eileen M. Collins. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. STS-93 is scheduled to lift off at 12:36 a.m. EDT July 20. The target landing date is July 24 at 11:31 p.m. EDT KSC-99pp0873

Flanked by security, the STS-93 crew wave to onlookers as they head for the "Astrovan" a second time to take them to Launch Pad 39-B and liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia. After the July 20 launch attempt was scrubbed at the T-7 second mark in the countdown, the launch was rescheduled for Thursday, July 22, at 12:28 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 26, 1999, at 11:24 p.m. EDT. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (starting at rear, left to right) Mission Specialists Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.), and Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.); Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby; and Commander Eileen M. Collins. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. The new telescope is 20 to 50 times more sensitive than any previous X-ray telescope and is expected unlock the secrets of supernovae, quasars and black holes. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission KSC-99pp0922

The STS-93 crew wave and cheer as they head for the "Astrovan" a third time to take them to Launch Pad 39-B and liftoff of Space Shuttle Columbia. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (starting at rear, left to right) Mission Specialists Michel Tognini of France, who represents the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), Catherine G. Coleman (Ph.D.), and Steven A. Hawley (Ph.D.); Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby; and Commander Eileen M. Collins. After Space Shuttle Columbia's July 20 and 22 launch attempts were scrubbed, the launch was again rescheduled for Friday, July 23, at 12:24 a.m. EDT. The target landing date is July 27 at 11:20 p.m. EDT. STS-93 is a five-day mission primarily to release the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. Collins is the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission KSC-99pp0949

The STS-103 crew head for the Astrovan that will take them to Launch Pad 39B and more Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. From left to right are (front row) Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.), and John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), and Pilot Scott J. Kelly; (back row) Mission Specialists Claude Nicollier of Switzerland and Jean-François Clervoy of France, who are with the European Space Agency, and Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. STS-103 is a "call-up" mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST KSC-99pp1323

Wearing their launch suits, the STS-103 crew exit the Operations and Checkout Building at KSC, heading for the Astrovan that will take them to Launch Pad 39B and more Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. In front (left to right) are Pilot Scott J. Kelly and Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr.; in the second row are Mission Specialists John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) and Jean-François Clervoy of France, who is with the European Space Agency (ESA); in the third row are C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.) and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, also with ESA; and at the rear is Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. STS-103 is a "call-up" mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST KSC-99pp1322

Wearing their launch suits, the STS-103 crew exit the Operations and Checkout Building at KSC, heading for the Astrovan that will take them to Launch Pad 39B and more Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. In front (left to right) are Pilot Scott J. Kelly and Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr.; in the second row are Mission Specialists John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) and Jean-François Clervoy of France, who is with the European Space Agency (ESA); in the third row are C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.) and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, also with ESA; and at the rear is Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. STS-103 is a "call-up" mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST KSC-99pp1322
Wearing their launch suits, the STS-103 crew exit the Operations and Checkout Building at KSC, heading for the Astrovan that will take them to Launch Pad 39B and more Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. In front (left to right) are Pilot Scott J. Kelly and Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr.; in the second row are Mission Specialists John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) and Jean-François Clervoy of France, who is with the European Space Agency (ESA); in the third row are C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.) and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, also with ESA; and at the rear is Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith. The TCDT provides the crew with emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter's payload bay, and simulated countdown exercises. STS-103 is a "call-up" mission due to the need to replace and repair portions of the Hubble Space Telescope, including the gyroscopes that allow the telescope to point at stars, galaxies and planets. The STS-103 crew will be replacing a Fine Guidance Sensor, an older computer with a new enhanced model, an older data tape recorder with a solid-state digital recorder, a failed spare transmitter with a new one, and degraded insulation on the telescope with new thermal insulation. The crew will also install a Battery Voltage/Temperature Improvement Kit to protect the spacecraft batteries from overcharging and overheating when the telescope goes into a safe mode. Four EVA's are planned to make the necessary repairs and replacements on the telescope. The mission is targeted for launch Dec. 6 at 2:37 a.m. EST KSC-99pp1322

The STS-103 crew smile and wave to onlookers as they head toward the "Astrovan" at right that will carry them to Launch Pad 39B for liftoff of Space Shuttle Discovery. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (front row) Pilot Scott J. Kelly and Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., (second row) Mission Specialists John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) and Jean-Francois Clervoy of France, (third row) C. Michael Foale (Ph. D.) and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and bringing up the rear, Steven L. Smith. The STS-103 mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is scheduled for launch Dec. 17 at 8:47 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39B. Mission objectives include replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. After the 8-day, 21-hour mission, Discovery is expected to land at KSC Sunday, Dec. 26, at about 6:30 p.m. EST KSC-99pp1450

An eager STS-103 crew emerge from behind the "Astrovan" at the Operations and Checkout Building to board the vehicle for transfer to Launch Pad 39B. Walking in pairs (from front to back) are Pilot Scott J. Kelly and Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., Mission Specialists John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.) and Jean-Francois Clervoy of France, C. Michael Foale (Ph.D.) and Claude Nicollier of Switzerland, and Steven L. Smith taking up the rear. A previous launch attempt on Dec. 17 was scrubbed about 8:52 p.m. due to numerous violations of weather launch commit criteria at KSC. The mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is now scheduled for launch Dec. 19 at 7:50 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39B. Mission objectives include replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. After the 7-day, 21-hour mission, Discovery is expected to land at KSC Monday, Dec. 27, at about 5:24 p.m. EST KSC-99pp1469

The STS-99 crew wave to onlookers as they walk to the astrovan which will take them to Launch Pad 39A and liftoff of Space Shuttle Endeavour, targeted for 12:47 p.m. EST. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (foreground) Pilot Dominic Gorie and Commander Kevin Kregel. Behind them (left to right) are Mission Specialists Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Mamoru Mohri (Ph.D.), Gerhard Thiele and Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.). Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, and Thiele is with the European Space Agency. The SRTM will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. The mission is expected to last about 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Friday, Feb. 11, at 4:55 p.m. EST KSC-00pp0124

The STS-99 crew wave to onlookers as they walk to the astrovan which will take them to Launch Pad 39A and liftoff of Space Shuttle Endeavour, targeted for 12:47 p.m. EST. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (foreground) Pilot Dominic Gorie and Commander Kevin Kregel. Behind them (left to right) are Mission Specialists Janice Voss (Ph.D.), Mamoru Mohri (Ph.D.), Gerhard Thiele and Janet Lynn Kavandi (Ph.D.). Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, and Thiele is with the European Space Agency. The SRTM will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface, using two antennae and a 200-foot-long section of space station-derived mast protruding from the payload bay. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Besides contributing to the production of better maps, these measurements could lead to improved water drainage modeling, more realistic flight simulators, better locations for cell phone towers, and enhanced navigation safety. The mission is expected to last about 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Friday, Feb. 11, at 4:55 p.m. EST KSC00pp0124

The STS-99 crew step eagerly to the "Astrovan," the bus that will take them to Launch Pad 39A for liftoff of Space Shuttle Endeavour. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (left to right) Mission Specialists Mamoru Mohri of Japan, Janice Voss, Gerhard Thiele of Germany and Janet Lynn Kavandi, Pilot Dominic Gorie and Commander Kevin Kregel. Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, and Thiele is with the European Space Agency. Known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), STS-99 is scheduled for liftoff at 12:30 p.m. EST. The SRTM will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. The mission is expected to last 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Tuesday, Feb. 22, at 4:36 p.m. EST. This is the 97th Shuttle flight and 14th for Shuttle Endeavour KSC00pp0211

The STS-99 crew step eagerly to the "Astrovan," the bus that will take them to Launch Pad 39A for liftoff of Space Shuttle Endeavour. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (left to right) Mission Specialists Mamoru Mohri of Japan, Janice Voss, Gerhard Thiele of Germany and Janet Lynn Kavandi, Pilot Dominic Gorie and Commander Kevin Kregel. Mohri is with the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, and Thiele is with the European Space Agency. Known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), STS-99 is scheduled for liftoff at 12:30 p.m. EST. The SRTM will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. The mission is expected to last 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Tuesday, Feb. 22, at 4:36 p.m. EST. This is the 97th Shuttle flight and 14th for Shuttle Endeavour KSC-00pp0211

The STS-101 crew walk from the Operations and Checkout Building to the Astrovan, which will take them to Space Shuttle Atlantis on Launch Pad 39A for a simulated countdown exercise. Leading the way are (left) Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz and (right) Commander James D. Halsell Jr. In the second row are Mission Specialists (left) Mary Ellen Weber and (right) Jeffrey N. Williams. In the third row are Mission Specialists (left) James Voss, (waving) Susan J. Helms, and (right) Yury Usachev of Russia. The dress rehearsal for launch is part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities that include emergency egress training and familiarization with the payload. During their mission to the International Space Station, the STS-101 crew will be delivering logistics and supplies, plus preparing the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. Also, the crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station. This will be the third assembly flight for the Space Station. STS-101 is scheduled to launch April 24 at 4:15 p.m. from Launch Pad 39A KSC-00pp0459

The STS-101 crew wave at onlookers as they walk from the Operations and Checkout Building to the Astrovan, which will take them to Space Shuttle Atlantis on Launch Pad 39A for a simulated countdown exercise. Leading the way are (left) Pilot Scott J. "Doc" Horowitz and (right) Commander James D. Halsell Jr. In the second row are Mission Specialists (left) Mary Ellen Weber and (right) Jeffrey N. Williams. In the third row are Mission Specialists (left) James Voss, (waving) Susan J. Helms, and (right) Yury Usachev of Russia. The dress rehearsal for launch is part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities that include emergency egress training and familiarization with the payload. During their mission to the International Space Station, the STS-101 crew will be delivering logistics and supplies, plus preparing the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. Also, the crew will conduct one space walk to perform maintenance on the Space Station. This will be the third assembly flight for the Space Station. STS-101 is scheduled to launch April 24 at 4:15 p.m. from Launch Pad 39A KSC-00pp0460

The STS-101 crew returns to the Operations and Checkout Building after the launch was scrubbed due to cross winds at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility gusting above 20 knots. Flight rules require cross winds at the SLF to be no greater than 15 knots in case of a contingency Shuttle landing. Shown leaving the Astrovan are (left to right) Mission Specialists James S. Voss and Yury Usachev of Russia; Pilot Scott J. Horowitz; and Commander James D. Halsell Jr. in the doorway. Weather conditions will be reevaluated for another launch try on April 25. The mission will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies and to prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. Also, the crew will conduct one space walk. This will be the third assembly flight to the Space Station. The mission is expected to last about 10 days KSC00pp0565

The STS-101 crew returns to the Operations and Checkout Building after the launch was scrubbed due to cross winds at the KSC Shuttle Landing Facility gusting above 20 knots. Flight rules require cross winds at the SLF to be no greater than 15 knots in case of a contingency Shuttle landing. Shown leaving the Astrovan are (left to right) Mission Specialists James S. Voss and Yury Usachev of Russia; Pilot Scott J. Horowitz; and Commander James D. Halsell Jr. in the doorway. Weather conditions will be reevaluated for another launch try on April 25. The mission will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies and to prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. Also, the crew will conduct one space walk. This will be the third assembly flight to the Space Station. The mission is expected to last about 10 days KSC-00pp0565

Waving to onlookers, the STS-101 crew eagerly walk to the waiting Astrovan that will take them to Launch Pad 39A and liftoff of Space Shuttle Atlantis, targeted for 4:15 p.m. EDT. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (in the f ront, left to right) Mission Specialists Susan Helms, Yuri Usachev of Russia and Mary Ellen Weber, plus Pilot Scott J. Horowitz; (in the rear, left to right) Mission Specialists James S. Voss and Jeffrey N. Williams, plus Commander James D. Halsell Jr. The mission will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies and to prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. Also, the crew will conduct one space walk. This will be the third assembly flight to the Space Station. The mission is expected to last about 10 days, with Atlantis landing at KSC Thursday, May 4, about 11:23 a.m. EDT KSC-00pp0564

Waving to onlookers, the STS-101 crew eagerly walk to the waiting Astrovan that will take them to Launch Pad 39A and liftoff of Space Shuttle Atlantis, targeted for 4:15 p.m. EDT. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (in the f ront, left to right) Mission Specialists Susan Helms, Yuri Usachev of Russia and Mary Ellen Weber, plus Pilot Scott J. Horowitz; (in the rear, left to right) Mission Specialists James S. Voss and Jeffrey N. Williams, plus Commander James D. Halsell Jr. The mission will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies and to prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. Also, the crew will conduct one space walk. This will be the third assembly flight to the Space Station. The mission is expected to last about 10 days, with Atlantis landing at KSC Thursday, May 4, about 11:23 a.m. EDT KSC00pp0564

Waving to onlookers, the STS-101 crew eagerly walk to the waiting Astrovan that will take them to Launch Pad 39A and the second attempt at liftoff of Space Shuttle Atlantis. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (left to right) Mission Specialists Susan J. Helms, Yury Usachev, James S. Voss, Mary Ellen Weber and Jeffrey N. Williams; Pilot Scott J. Horowitz; and Commander James D. Halsell Jr. The first launch attempt on April 24 was scrubbed due to unfavorable weather conditions. The mission will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies and to prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. Also, the crew will conduct one space walk. This will be the third assembly flight to the Space Station. Liftoff is targeted for 3:52 p.m. EDT. The mission is expected to last about 10 days, with Atlantis landing at KSC Saturday, May 6, about 11:53 a.m. EDT KSC00pp0575

Waving to onlookers, the STS-101 crew eagerly walk to the waiting Astrovan that will take them to Launch Pad 39A and the second attempt at liftoff of Space Shuttle Atlantis. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (left to right) Mission Specialists Susan J. Helms, Yury Usachev, James S. Voss, Mary Ellen Weber and Jeffrey N. Williams; Pilot Scott J. Horowitz; and Commander James D. Halsell Jr. The first launch attempt on April 24 was scrubbed due to unfavorable weather conditions. The mission will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies and to prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. Also, the crew will conduct one space walk. This will be the third assembly flight to the Space Station. Liftoff is targeted for 3:52 p.m. EDT. The mission is expected to last about 10 days, with Atlantis landing at KSC Saturday, May 6, about 11:53 a.m. EDT KSC-00pp0575

Smiling and waving to onlookers, the STS-101 crew eagerly walk to the waiting Astrovan that will take them to Launch Pad 39A a third time for launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis. From left are Mission Specialists Susan J. Helms, Yury Usachev of Russia, James S. Voss, Mary Ellen Weber and Jeffrey N. Williams; Pilot Scott J. Horowitz; and Commander James D. Halsell Jr. (pointing). The previous two launch attempts were scrubbed due to high cross winds at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The mission will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies and to prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. Also, the crew will conduct one space walk. This is the third assembly flight to the Space Station. After the 10-day mission, Atlantis is expected to land at KSC May 6 at about 12:03 p.m. EDT KSC-00pp0585

Smiling and waving to onlookers, the STS-101 crew eagerly walk to the waiting Astrovan that will take them to Launch Pad 39A a third time for launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis. From left are Mission Specialists Susan J. Helms, Yury Usachev of Russia, James S. Voss, Mary Ellen Weber and Jeffrey N. Williams; Pilot Scott J. Horowitz; and Commander James D. Halsell Jr. (pointing). The previous two launch attempts were scrubbed due to high cross winds at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The mission will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies and to prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. Also, the crew will conduct one space walk. This is the third assembly flight to the Space Station. After the 10-day mission, Atlantis is expected to land at KSC May 6 at about 12:03 p.m. EDT KSC00pp0585

The STS-101 crew wave and smile at onlookers as they head to the Astrovan for the trip to Launch Pad 39A and the fourth attempt at launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (left to right) Mission Specialists Susan J. Helms, Yury Usachev of Russia, James S. Voss, Mary Ellen Weber, Jeffrey N. Williams; Pilot Scott “Doc” Horowitz; and Commander James D. Halsell Jr. The mission will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies and to prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. Also, the crew will conduct one space walk and will reboost the space station from 230 statute miles to 250 statute miles. This will be the third assembly flight to the Space Station. Liftoff of Space Shuttle Atlantis for the 10-day mission is scheduled for about 6:11 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A. Landing is targeted for May 29 at 2:19 a.m. EDT KSC-00pp0646

The STS-101 crew show their joy and eagerness to begin their mission as they had to the Astrovan for the trip to Launch Pad 39A and the fourth attempt at launch of Space Shuttle Atlantis. In their orange launch and entry suits, they are (left to right) Mission Specialists Susan J. Helms, Yury Usachev of Russia, James S. Voss, Mary Ellen Weber, Jeffrey N. Williams; Pilot Scott “Doc” Horowitz; and Commander James D. Halsell Jr. The mission will take the crew to the International Space Station to deliver logistics and supplies and to prepare the Station for the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module, expected to be launched by Russia in July 2000. Also, the crew will conduct one space walk and will reboost the space station from 230 statute miles to 250 statute miles. This will be the third assembly flight to the Space Station. Liftoff of Space Shuttle Atlantis for the 10-day mission is scheduled for about 6:11 a.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A. Landing is targeted for May 29 at 2:19 a.m. EDT KSC-00pp0647

The STS-106 crew wave to onlookers as they rush to the Astrovan that will take them to Launch Pad 39B. From left to right are Mission Specialists Daniel C. Burbank, Boris V. Morukov, Richard A. Mastracchio, Edward T. Lu and Yuri I. Malenchenko; Commander Terrence W. Wilcutt; and Pilot Scott D. Altman. Liftoff of Space Shuttle Atlantis is set for 8:45 a.m. EDT on the fourth flight to the International Space Station. On the 11-day mission, the seven-member crew will perform support tasks on orbit, transfer supplies and prepare the living quarters in the newly arrived Zvezda Service Module. The first long-duration crew, dubbed “Expedition One,” is due to arrive at the Station in late fall KSC-00pp1261

The STS-92 crew exits the Operations and Checkout Building on their way to the Astrovan and Launch Pad 39A for a simulated countdown. On the left, front to back, are Pilot Pamela Ann Melroy and Mission Specialists Leroy Chiao, Peter J.K. “Jeff” Wisoff, and Koichi Wakata of Japan. On the right, front to back, are Commander Brian Duffy and Mission Specialists William S. McArthur Jr. and Michael E. Lopez-Alegria. The crew is taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that provide emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect the mission payload, and the simulated countdown. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 at 9:38 p.m. EDT on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. It will carry two elements of the Space Station, the Integrated Truss Structure Z1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The mission is also the 100th flight in the Shuttle program KSC-00pp1361

The STS-92 crew exits the Operations and Checkout Building on their way to the Astrovan and Launch Pad 39A for a simulated countdown. Walking left to right are (foreground) Mission Specialists Koichi Wakata of Japan, Peter J.K. “Jeff” Wisoff and Leroy Chiao; and Pilot Pamela Ann Melroy. Behind them are Mission Specialists Michael E. Lopez-Alegria and William S. McArthur Jr.; and Commander Brian Duffy. The crew is taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that provide emergency egress training, opportunities to inspect the mission payload, and the simulated countdown. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 at 9:38 p.m. EDT on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. It will carry two elements of the Space Station, the Integrated Truss Structure Z1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The mission is also the 100th flight in the Shuttle program KSC-00pp1360

STS-92 Commander Brian Duffy pauses in the door of the Astrovan before exiting at the Operations and Checkout Building. The vehicle is returning the crew after the scheduled launch to the International Space Station (ISS) was scrubbed about 90 minutes before liftoff. The mission will be the fifth flight for the construction of the ISS. The payload includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z-1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. During the 11-day mission, four extravehicular activities (EVAs), or spacewalks, are planned. The Z-1 truss is the first of 10 that will become the backbone of the International Space Station, eventually stretching the length of a football field. PMA-3 will provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. The launch has been rescheduled for liftoff Oct. 11 at 7:17 p.m KSC-00pp1534

STS-92 Pilot Pamela Ann Melroy exits the Astrovan on its return to the Operations and Checkout Building. Behind her is Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata of Japan. The scheduled launch to the International Space Station (ISS) was scrubbed about 90 minutes before liftoff. The mission will be the fifth flight for the construction of the ISS. The payload includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z-1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. During the 11-day mission, four extravehicular activities (EVAs), or spacewalks, are planned. The Z-1 truss is the first of 10 that will become the backbone of the International Space Station, eventually stretching the length of a football field. PMA-3 will provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. The launch has been rescheduled for liftoff Oct. 11 at 7:17 p.m KSC-00pp1532

STS-92 Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata of Japan exits the Astrovan on its return to the Operations and Checkout Building. Behind him is Mission Specialist Leroy Chiao. The scheduled launch to the International Space Station (ISS) was scrubbed about 90 minutes before liftoff. The mission will be the fifth flight for the construction of the ISS. The payload includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z-1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. During the 11-day mission, four extravehicular activities (EVAs), or spacewalks, are planned. The Z-1 truss is the first of 10 that will become the backbone of the International Space Station, eventually stretching the length of a football field. PMA-3 will provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. The launch has been rescheduled for liftoff Oct. 11 at 7:17 p.m KSC-00pp1533

The STS-92 crew strides eagerly to the waiting Astrovan that will take them to Launch Pad 39A for liftoff at 8:05 p.m. EDT to the International Space Station (ISS). They are (from front to back) Pilot Pamela Ann Melroy and Commander Brian Duffy; and Mission Specialists Leroy Chiao and William S. McArthur Jr.; Peter J.K. Wisoff; Michael E. Lopez-Alegria and Koichi Wakata of Japan. The mission is the fifth flight for the construction of the ISS. The payload includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z-1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. During the 11-day mission, four extravehicular activities (EVAs), or spacewalks, are planned. The Z-1 truss is the first of 10 that will become the backbone of the International Space Station, eventually stretching the length of a football field. PMA-3 will provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. This launch is the second for Wakata. Landing is expected Oct. 21 at 3:55 p.m. EDT KSC-00pp1530

Striding happily to the waiting Astrovan for the trip to Launch Pad 39A are (left to right) STS-92 Mission Specialists Michael E. Lopez-Alegria, Koichi Wakata of Japan, Peter J.K. “Jeff” Wisoff, Leroy Chiao and William S. McArthur; Pilot Pamela Ann Melroy; and Commander Brian Duffy. STS-92 is scheduled for liftoff to the International Space Station (ISS) at 8:05 p.m. EDT. The mission is the fifth flight for the construction of the ISS. The payload includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z-1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. During the 11-day mission, four extravehicular activities (EVAs), or spacewalks, are planned. The Z-1 truss is the first of 10 that will become the backbone of the International Space Station, eventually stretching the length of a football field. PMA-3 will provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth ISS flight and Lab installation on the seventh ISS flight. Landing is expected Oct. 21 at 3:55 p.m. EDT KSC-00pp1531

Three happy astronauts make their way to the waiting Astrovan that will take the STS-92 crew to Launch Pad 39A for liftoff of Space Shuttle Discovery. From left, they are Mission Specialists Michael Lopez-Alegria and Koichi Wakata, and Commander Brian Duffy. During the 11-day mission to the International Space Station, four extravehicular activities (EVAs), or spacewalks, are planned for construction. The payload includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z-1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The Z-1 truss is the first of 10 that will become the backbone of the Space Station, eventually stretching the length of a football field. PMA-3 will provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth Station flight and Lab installation on the seventh Station flight. Launch is scheduled for 7:17 p.m. EDT. Discovery’s landing is expected Oct. 22 at 2:10 p.m. EDT KSC-00pp1548

STS-92 Mission Specialist William S. McArthur Jr. is fully suited up before the second launch attempt. He and the rest of the crew will be leaving soon for the ride to Launch Pad 39A on the Astrovan. During the 11-day mission to the International Space Station, four extravehicular activities (EVAs), or spacewalks, are planned for construction. The payload includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z-1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The Z-1 truss is the first of 10 that will become the backbone of the Space Station, eventually stretching the length of a football field. PMA-3 will provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth Station flight and Lab installation on the seventh Station flight.; Launch is scheduled for 7:17 p.m. EDT. Landing is expected Oct. 22 at 2:10 p.m. EDT KSC-00pp1541

During suitup in the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-92 Mission Specialist Michael E. Lopez-Alegria smiles and clasps his hands in anticipation of a second launch attempt. He and the rest of the crew will be heading out to the Astrovan for the ride to Launch Pad 39A. During the 11-day mission to the International Space Station, four extravehicular activities (EVAs), or spacewalks, are planned for construction. The payload includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z-1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The Z-1 truss is the first of 10 that will become the backbone of the Space Station, eventually stretching the length of a football field. PMA-3 will provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth Station flight and Lab installation on the seventh Station flight. Launch is scheduled for 7:17 p.m. EDT. Landing is expected Oct. 22 at 2:10 p.m. EDT KSC-00pp1542

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-92 Commander Brian Duffy solemnly undergoes suit check before heading out to the Astrovan for the ride to Launch Pad 39A. During the 11-day mission to the International Space Station, four extravehicular activities (EVAs), or spacewalks, are planned for construction. The payload includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z-1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The Z-1 truss is the first of 10 that will become the backbone of the Space Station, eventually stretching the length of a football field. PMA-3 will provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth Station flight and Lab installation on the seventh Station flight. Launch is scheduled for 7:17 p.m. EDT. Landing is expected Oct. 22 at 2:10 p.m. EDT KSC-00pp1543

In the Operations and Checkout Building, STS-92 Pilot Pamela Ann Melroy smiles during suit check before heading out to the Astrovan for the ride to Launch Pad 39A. During the 11-day mission to the International Space Station, four extravehicular activities (EVAs), or spacewalks, are planned for construction. The payload includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z-1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The Z-1 truss is the first of 10 that will become the backbone of the Space Station, eventually stretching the length of a football field. PMA-3 will provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth Station flight and Lab installation on the seventh Station flight. Launch is scheduled for 7:17 p.m. EDT. Landing is expected Oct. 22 at 2:10 p.m. EDT KSC-00pp1544

Smiling and waving at photographers and onlookers, the STS-92 crew hurries to the waiting Astrovan for the trip to Launch Pad 39A and liftoff of Space Shuttle Discovery. Clockwise from right, leading the way are Commander Brian Duffy and Pilot Pamela Ann Melroy; then Mission Specialists Leroy Chiao, Koichi Wakata of Japan, Michael Lopez-Alegria, William S. McArthur Jr. and Peter J.K. “Jeff” Wisoff. During the 11-day mission to the International Space Station, four extravehicular activities (EVAs), or spacewalks, are planned for construction. The payload includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z-1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The Z-1 truss is the first of 10 that will become the backbone of the Space Station, eventually stretching the length of a football field. PMA-3 will provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth Station flight and Lab installation on the seventh Station flight. This launch is the fourth for Duffy and Wisoff, the third for Chiao and McArthur, second for Wakata and Lopez-Alegria, and first for Melroy. Launch is scheduled for 7:17 p.m. EDT. Discovery’s landing is expected Oct. 22 at 2:10 p.m. EDT KSC-00pp1546

Eager to get to the launch pad and liftoff of Space Shuttle Discovery on mission STS-92, the crew hurries to the waiting Astrovan for the trip. From left are Mission Specialists Michael E. Lopez-Alegria, Koichi Wakata of Japan, William S. McArthur Jr., Leroy Chiao and Peter J.K. “Jeff” Wisoff; Pilot Pamela Ann Melroy; and Commander Brian Duffy. This launch is the fourth for Duffy and Wisoff, the third for Chiao and McArthur, second for Wakata and Lopez-Alegria, and first for Melroy. During the 11-day mission to the International Space Station, four extravehicular activities (EVAs), or spacewalks, are planned for construction. The payload includes the Integrated Truss Structure Z-1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The Z-1 truss is the first of 10 that will become the backbone of the Space Station, eventually stretching the length of a football field. PMA-3 will provide a Shuttle docking port for solar array installation on the sixth Station flight and Lab installation on the seventh Station flight. Launch is scheduled for 7:17 p.m. EDT. Discovery’s landing is expected Oct. 22 at 2:10 p.m. EDT KSC-00pp1547

The STS-97 crew heads for the Astrovan and a ride to Launch Pad 39B as they continue Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. Seen left to right are Mission Specialists Joe Tanner, Carlos Noriega and Marc Garneau; Pilot Mike Bloomfield; and Commander Brent Jett. The TCDT provides emergency egress training, a simulated launch countdown and opportunities to inspect the mission payloads in the orbiter’s payload bay. Mission STS-97is the sixth construction flight to the International Space Station. Its payload includes the P6 Integrated Truss Structure and a photovoltaic (PV) module, with giant solar arrays that will provide power to the Station. The mission includes two spacewalks to complete the solar array connections. STS-97 is scheduled to launch Nov. 30 at 10:05 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1674

Leaving the Operations and Checkout Building, the STS-97 crew hurries toward the waiting Astrovan that will take them to Launch Pad 39B. Starting at left, they are Mission Specialists Carlos Noriega, Joseph Tanner and Marc Garneau; Pilot Michael Bloomfield; and Commander Brent Jett. Garneau is with the Canadian Space Agency. Mission STS-97 is the sixth construction flight to the International Space Station. It is transporting the P6 Integrated Truss Structure that comprises Solar Array Wing-3 and the Integrated Electronic Assembly, to be installed on the Space Station. The solar arrays are mounted on a “blanket” that can be folded like an accordion for delivery. Once in orbit, astronauts will deploy the blankets to their full size. The 11-day mission includes two spacewalks to complete the solar array connections. The Station’s electrical power system will use eight photovoltaic solar arrays, each 112 feet long by 39 feet wide, to convert sunlight to electricity. Gimbals will be used to rotate the arrays so that they will face the Sun to provide maximum power to the Space Station. Launch is scheduled for Nov. 30 at 10:06 p.m. EST KSC-00pp1785

After walkout from the Operations and Checkout Building, the <a href="../../subjects/sts-98.htm"> STS-98</a> crew stops for a photograph in front of the Astrovan that will take them to <a href="../../subjects/lc39a.htm"> Launch Pad 39A</a> for a simulated launch countdown. Standing left to right are Mission Specialists Thomas Jones and Robert Curbeam, Pilot Mark Polansky, Mission Specialist Marsha Ivins and Commander Ken Cockrell. The crew has been taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include the simulated countdown and emergency egress training at the pad. STS-98 is the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station, carrying as payload the U.S. Lab <a href="../../subjects/destiny.htm">Destiny</a>, a key element in the construction of the ISS. Launch of STS-98 is scheduled for Jan. 19 at 2:11 a.m. EST KSC-01pp0041

The STS-98 crew leaves the Operations and Checkout Building and heads for the “Astrovan” that will take them to Space Shuttle Atlantis on Launch Pad 39A. From left are Mission Specialists Robert Curbeam, Thomas Jones and Marsha Ivins, Pilot Mark Polansky and Commander Ken Cockrell. They will be flying the seventh construction flight to the International Space Station. Atlantis is carrying the U.S. Laboratory Destiny, a key module in the growth of the Space Station. Destiny will be attached to the Unity node on the Space Station using the Shuttle’s robotic arm. Three spacewalks are required to complete the planned construction work during the 11-day mission. Launch is targeted for 6:11 p.m. EST and the planned landing at KSC Feb. 18 about 1:39 p.m. This mission marks the seventh Shuttle flight to the Space Station, the 23rd flight of Atlantis and the 102nd flight overall in NASA’s Space Shuttle program KSC01pp0272

The STS-102 crew heads to the silver Astrovan after leaving the Operations and Checkout Building. In front, left to right, are Mission Specialists Paul Richards, James Voss, Susan Helms and Yury Usachev. Behind then are Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Pilot James Kelly and Commander James Wetherbee. Voss, Helms and Usachev are the Expedition Two crew, going to the International Space Station for their four-month rotation. The Astrovan will take the crew to Launch Pad 39B for a simulated countdown, part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the Space Station, with Space Shuttle Discovery carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. In addition, Expedition One will return to Earth with Discovery. Launch on mission STS-102 is scheduled for March 8 KSC-01pp0318

Waving to media and bystanders, the STS-102 crew strides to the silver Astrovan after leaving the Operations and Checkout Building. In front, left to right, are Mission Specialists Paul Richards, James Voss, Susan Helms and Yury Usachev. Behind then are Mission Specialist Andrew Thomas, Pilot James Kelly and Commander James Wetherbee. Voss, Helms and Usachev are the Expedition Two crew, going to the International Space Station for their four-month rotation. The Astrovan will take the crew to Launch Pad 39B for a simulated countdown, part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the Space Station, with Space Shuttle Discovery carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. In addition, Expedition One will return to Earth with Discovery. Launch on mission STS-102 is scheduled for March 8 KSC-01pp0319

The STS-102 crew heads to the silver Astrovan after leaving the Operations and Checkout Building. In front are Mission Specialist Yury Usachev (left) and Commander James Wetherbee; second are Mission Specialist Susan Helms and Pilot James Kelly; third, Mission Specialists James Voss and Andrew Thomas; and last, Mission Specialist Paul Richards. Voss, Helms and Usachev are the Expedition Two crew, going to the International Space Station for their four-month rotation. The Astrovan will take the crew to Launch Pad 39B for a simulated countdown, part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the Space Station, with Space Shuttle Discovery carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. In addition, Expedition One will return to Earth with Discovery. Launch on mission STS-102 is scheduled for March 8 KSC-01pp0317

The STS-102 crew wave to onlookers as they head for the Astrovan after leaving the Operations and Checkout Building. Left to right are Mission Specialists Andrew Thomas, Paul Richards and James Voss; Pilot James Kelly; Mission Specialist Susan Helms; Commander James Wetherbee; and Mission Specialist Yury Usachev. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the Space Station, carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. The primary delivery system used to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment, Leonardo will deliver up to 10 tons of laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments and supplies for outfitting the newly installed U.S. Laboratory Destiny. In addition, Voss, Helms and Usachev, known as Expedition Two, are flying to the Station to replace Expedition One, who will return to Earth on Discovery. Discovery is set to launch March 8 at 6:42 a.m. EST. The 12-day mission is expected to end with a landing at KSC on March 20 KSC01pp0434

The STS-102 crew heads for the Astrovan after leaving the Operations and Checkout Building behind them. In front, left to right, are Mission Specialists James Voss, Susan Helms and Yury Usachev. In back, left to right, are Mission Specialists Andrew Thomas and Paul Richards, Pilot James Kelly and Commander James Wetherbee. STS-102 is the eighth construction flight to the Space Station, carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. The primary delivery system used to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment, Leonardo will deliver up to 10 tons of laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments and supplies for outfitting the newly installed U.S. Laboratory Destiny. In addition, Voss, Helms and Usachev, known as Expedition Two, are flying to the Station to replace Expedition One, who will return to Earth on Discovery. Discovery is set to launch March 8 at 6:42 a.m. EST. The 12-day mission is expected to end with a landing at KSC on March 20 KSC01pp0433

The STS-100 crew strides out of the Operations and Checkout Building on their way to the Astrovan and Launch Pad 39A. From front to back are Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby and Commander Kent V. Rominger; Mission Specialists Yuri V. Lonchakov and Chris A. Hadfield, Umberto Guidoni and John L. Phillips, with Scott E. Parazynski waving at the rear. At the pad they will take part in a simulated launch countdown. The mission is carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello and the SSRMS, to the International Space Station. Raffaello carries six system racks and two storage racks for the U.S. Lab. The SSRMS is crucial to the continued assembly of the orbiting complex. Launch of mission STS-100 is scheduled for April 19 at 2:41 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A KSC-01pp0619

Leaving the Operations and Checkout Building, the STS-100 crew waves to well-wishers and heads to the Astrovan for transport to Launch Pad 39A. . Leading in front are Pilot Jeffrey S. Ashby (left) and Commander Kent V. Rominger (right). Behind them are (left to right) Mission Specialists Yuri Lonchakov and Chris A. Hadfield. Next are Mission Specialists Umberto Guidoni (left) and John L. Phillips (right). Following in the rear is Mission Specialist Scott E. Parazynski. An international crew, Guidoni represents the European Space Agency, Lonchakov the Russian Aviation and Space Agency and Hadfield the Canadian Space Agency. Space Shuttle Endeavour and its crew will deliver and integrate the Spacelab Logistics Pallet/Launch Deployment Assembly, which includes the Space Station Remote Manipulator System and the UHF Antenna. The mission includes two planned spacewalks for installation of the SSRMS, which will be performed by Parazynski and Hadfield. The mission is also the inaugural flight of Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello, carrying resupply stowage racks and resupply/return stowage platforms. Liftoff of Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-100 is scheduled at 2:41 p.m. EDT April 19 KSC-01pp0819

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Dressed in their orange launch and entry suits, the STS-104 crew eagerly walk to the Astrovan that will take them to Launch Pad 39B and a simulated countdown exercise. From left are Mission Specialists Michael L. Gernhardt, James F. Reilly and Janet Lynn Kavandi; Commander Steven W. Lindsey and Pilot Charles O. Hobaugh. The crew is taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which include emergency exit training from the orbiter, opportunities to inspect their mission payloads in the orbiter’s payload bay and simulated countdown exercises. The launch of Atlantis on mission STS-104 is scheduled July 12 from Launch Pad 39B. The mission is the 10th flight to the International Space Station and carries the Joint Airlock Module KSC-01pp1216

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- After a 24-hour delay of the STS-105 launch, Commander Scott Horowitz is the first off the Astrovan returning the crews to the Operations and Checkout Building. Behind him is Mission Specialist Daniel Barry. Launch countdown activities for the 12-day mission were called off at about 5:12 p.m. Aug. 9 during the T-9 minute hold due to the high potential for lightning, a thick cloud cover and the potential for showers. These were clear violations of launch weather criteria. The next launch attempt will be on Friday, Aug. 10, at the preferred launch time of about 5:15 p.m. The launch window extends for about 5 minutes. On the mission, Space Shuttle Discovery will be transporting the Expedition Three crew and several scientific experiments and payloads to the International Space Station, including the Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS) tank. The EAS, which will support the thermal control subsystems until a permanent system is activated, will be attached to the Station during two spacewalks. The three-member Expedition Two crew will be returning to Earth aboard Discovery after a five-month stay on the Station KSC-01pp1451

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Waving to onlookers, the STS-105 and Expedition Three (E3) crews head to the Astrovan that will take them to Launch Pad 39A for a second attempt at launch on mission STS-105. From the left are E3 cosmonaut Mikhail Tyurin, Commander Frank Culbertson and cosmonaut Vladimir Dezhurov; STS-105 Mission Specialists Patrick Forrester and Daniel Barry, Pilot Rick Sturckow and Commander Scott Horowitz. . Launch countdown activities for the 12-day mission were called off at about 5:12 p.m. Aug. 9 during the T-9 minute hold due to the high potential for lightning, a thick cloud cover and the potential for showers. Launch is currently scheduled for 5:15 p.m. EDT Aug. 10. Highlighting the mission will be the rotation of the International Space Station crew, the third flight of an Italian-built Multi-Purpose Logistics Module delivering additional scientific racks, equipment and supplies for the Space Station, and two spacewalks. Included in the payload is the Early Ammonia Servicer (EAS) tank, which will be attached to the Station during the spacewalks. The EAS will be installed on the P6 truss, which holds the Station’s giant U.S. solar arrays, batteries and the cooling radiators. The EAS contains spare ammonia for the Station’s cooling system. The three-member Expedition Two crew will be returning to Earth aboard Discovery after a five-month stay on the Station KSC-01pp1462

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The STS-108 crew leads the way to the Astrovan for a ride to Launch Pad 39B for a simulated launch countdown. They are followed by the Expedition 4 crew. From front to back, left and right, are Pilot Mark E. Kelly and Commander Dominic L. Gorie; Mission Specialists Daniel M. Tani and Linda A. Godwin; Expedition 4 Commander Yuri Onufrienko; astronauts Daniel W. Bursch and Carl E. Walz. The simulated countdown is part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities, which have also included emergency exit training from the orbiter. Launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-108 is scheduled for Nov. 29 at 7:44 p.m. EST KSC-01pp1682

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - The STS-108 and Expedition 4 crews stride out of the Operations and Checkout Building to the Astrovan bus that will carry them to Space Shuttle Endeavour on Launch Pad 39B. Beginning with the front row, left to right, are STS-108 Pilot Mark E. Kelly and Commander Dominic L. Gorie; second row, Mission Specialists Daniel M. Tani and Linda A. Godwin; third row, Expedition 4 crew members Daniel W. Bursch, Commander Yuri Onufrienko and Carl E. Walz. Mission STS-108 is the 12th flight to the International Space Station and the sixth and last flight of 2001. Top priorities for the 11-day STS-108 (UF-1) mission of Endeavour are rotation of the International Space Station Expedition 3 and Expedition 4 crews; bringing water, equipment and supplies to the station in the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello; and the crew's completion of robotics tasks and a spacewalk to install thermal blankets over two pieces of equipment at the bases of the Space Station's solar wings. The three-member Expedition 3 crew will be returning to Earth aboard Endeavour after a five-month stay on the Station. Launch of Endeavour is scheduled for 5:45 p.m. EST Dec. 4, 2001, from Launch Pad 39B KSC01pd1772

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Expedition 4 Commander Yuri Onufrienko steps down from the Astrovan after returning from Space Shuttle Endeavour. The launch of STS-108 was delayed by one day Dec. 4, 2001, due to poor weather at Kennedy. Space Shuttle Endeavour is now scheduled to lift off at 5:19 p.m. EST (2219 GMT) Dec. 5 KSC01pd1773

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The STS-108 and Expedition 4 crews head for the Astrovan and a ride to Launch Pad 39B. Leading the way are Pilot Mark E. Kelly (left) and Commander Dominic L. Gorie; behind them are Mission Specialists Daniel M. Tani and Linda A. Godwin; next is Expedition 4 Commander Yuri Onufrienko, followed by astronauts Daniel W. Bursch (left) and Carl E. Walz. This is the second launch attempt after the first attempt Dec. 4 was scrubbed due to poor weather conditions at KSC. The main goals of the mission are to carry the Expedition 4 crew to the International Space Station as replacement for Expedition 3; carry the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello filled with water, equipment and supplies; and install thermal blankets over equipment at the base of the ISS solar wings. STS-108 is the final Shuttle mission of 2001 and the 107th Shuttle flight overall. Launch is scheduled for 5:19 p.m. EST (22:19 GMT) Dec. 5, 2001, from Launch Pad 39B KSC01PD1784

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-109 crew walks toward the Astrovan for a ride to the launch pad. Leading the way are Commander Scott Altman and Pilot Duane Carey; behind them are Mission Specialist Nancy Currie followed by Payload Commander John Grunsfeld (left) and Mission Specialist Rick Linnehan (right); in the rear are Mission Specialists James Newman and Michael Massimino. The crew is taking part in Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities that include emergency egress training and a simulated countdown at the pad. Columbia is scheduled to be launched Feb. 28 on mission STS-109, a Hubble Servicing Mission. The goal of the mission is to replace Solar Array 2 with Solar Array 3, replace the Power Control Unit, remove the Faint Object Camera and install the ACS, install the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) Cooling System, and install New Outer Blanket Layer insulation. The launch will be the first for Columbia after returning from California where it underwent extensive maintenance, inspections and enhancements. More than 100 upgrades make Columbia safer and more reliable than ever before KSC-02pp0072

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-110 crew heads for the Astrovan to take them to the launch pad and a simulated launch countdown. From left are Mission Specialists Jerry Ross, Lee Morin, Steven Smith (rear), Rex Walheim and Ellen Ochoa; Pilot Stephen Frick and Commander Michael Bloomfield. The simulation is part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities. TCDT also includes emergency egress training and is held at KSC prior to each Space Shuttle flight. Scheduled for launch April 4, the 11-day mission will feature Shuttle Atlantis docking with the International Space Station (ISS) and delivering the S0 truss, the centerpiece-segment of the primary truss structure that will eventually extend over 300 feet KSC-02pd0308

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-110 crew heads for the Astrovan and a ride to Launch Pad 39B for the launch scheduled at 4:40 p.m. EDT (20:40 GMT). From left-foreground are Mission Specialists Jerry L. Ross and Rex J. Walheim; left, second row, are Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith, Lee M.E. Morin, Ellen Ochoa; Pilot Stephen N. Frick; and Commander Michael J. Bloomfield. STS-110 is the 13th assembly flight to the International Space Station, carrying the S0 Integrated Truss Structure and Mobile Transporter (MT). On the 11-day mission, the mission features four spacewalks to attach the S0 truss, which will become the backbone of the Space Station, to the U.S. Lab, "Destiny." The MT, a space "railcar," is attached to the truss segment and will make its debut run during the flight KSC-02pd0446

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-111 crew and Expedition 5 walk eagerly to the Astrovan that will take them to Launch Pad 39A for a simulated countdown. From left are Mission Specialists Philippe Perrin and Franklin Chang-Diaz; the Expedition 5 crew, Sergei Treschev, Peggy Whitson and Valeri Korzun; Pilot Paul Lockhart; and Commander Kenneth Cockrell. The simulation is part of STS-111 Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities for the crew and Expedition 5. The payload on the mission to the International Space Station includes the Mobile Base System (MBS), an Orbital Replacement Unit and Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo. The MBS will be installed on the Mobile Transporter to complete the Canadian Mobile Servicing System, or MSS, enabling Canadarm 2 to "inchworm" from the U.S. Lab Destiny to the MSS and travel along the truss to work sites. The Expedition 5 crew is traveling on Endeavour to replace the Expedition 4 crew on the Station. Launch of Endeavour is scheduled for May 30, 2002 KSC-02pd0714

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Expedition 5 cosmonaut Sergei Treschev (RSA) steps down from the Astrovan outside the crew quarters at the Operations and Checkout Building after returning from Space Shuttle Endeavour at Launch Pad 39A. The launch of STS-111 was scrubbed due to poor weather at KSC. STS-111 is the second Utilization Flight to the International Space Station, carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo, the Mobile Base System (MBS), and a replacement wrist/roll joint for the Canadarm 2. Also on board will be the Expedition Five crew who will replace Expedition Four on the Station. Launch is rescheduled for May 31 at 7:22 p.m. EDT KSC-02pd0845

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-111 and Expedition 5 crews look toward spectators as they head for the waiting Astrovan that that will take them to Launch Pad 39A and Space Shuttle Endeavour. From front to back are Pilot Paul Lockhart and Commander Kenneth Cockrell; astronaut Peggy Whitson; Expedition 5 cosmonaut Sergei Treschev (RSA) and Commander Valeri Korzun (RSA); and Mission Specialists Philippe Perrin (CNES) and Franklin Chang-Diaz. STS-111 is the second Utilization Flight to the International Space Station, carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo, the Mobile Base System (MBS), and a replacement wrist/roll joint for the Canadarm 2. Also onboard Space Shuttle Endeavour is the Expedition 5 crew who will replace Expedition 4 on board the Station. The MBS will be installed on the Mobile Transporter to complete the Canadian Mobile Servicing System, or MSS. The mechanical arm will then have the capability to "inchworm" from the U.S. Lab Destiny to the MSS and travel along the truss to work sites. Expedition 4 crew members will return to Earth with the STS-111 crew on Endeavour. KSC-02pd0838

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-111 Commander Kenneth Cockrell and Pilot Paul Lockhart step down from the Astrovan outside the crew quarters at the Operations and Checkout Building after returning from Space Shuttle Endeavour at Launch Pad 39A. The launch of STS-111 was scrubbed due to poor weather at KSC. STS-111 is the second Utilization Flight to the International Space Station, carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo, the Mobile Base System (MBS), and a replacement wrist/roll joint for the Canadarm 2. Also on board will be the Expedition Five crew who will replace Expedition Four on the Station. Launch is rescheduled for May 31 at 7:22 p.m. EDT KSC-02pd0840

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The STS-111 and Expedition 5 crews eagerly stride from the Operations and Checkout Building toward the waiting Astrovan that will take them to Launch Pad 39A and Space Shuttle Endeavour. From front to back are Pilot Paul Lockhart and Commander Kenneth Cockrell; astronaut Peggy Whitson and Expedition 5 Commander Valeri Korzun (RSA); cosmonaut Sergei Treschev (RSA); and Mission Specialists Philippe Perrin (CNES) and Franklin Chang-Diaz. STS-111 is the second Utilization Flight to the International Space Station, carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo, the Mobile Base System (MBS), and a replacement wrist/roll joint for the Canadarm 2. Also onboard Space Shuttle Endeavour is the Expedition 5 crew who will replace Expedition 4 on board the Station. The MBS will be installed on the Mobile Transporter to complete the Canadian Mobile Servicing System, or MSS. The mechanical arm will then have the capability to "inchworm" from the U.S. Lab Destiny to the MSS and travel along the truss to work sites. Expedition 4 crew members will return to Earth with the STS-111 crew on Endeavour. KSC-02pd0837

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Expedition 5 astronaut Peggy Whitson steps down from the Astrovan outside the crew quarters at the Operations and Checkout Building after returning from Space Shuttle Endeavour at Launch Pad 39A. The launch of STS-111 was scrubbed due to poor weather at KSC. STS-111 is the second Utilization Flight to the International Space Station, carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo, the Mobile Base System (MBS), and a replacement wrist/roll joint for the Canadarm 2. Also on board will be the Expedition Five crew who will replace Expedition Four on the Station. Launch is rescheduled for May 31 at 7:22 p.m. EDT KSC-02pd0841

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-111 Pilot Paul Lockhart steps down from the Astrovan outside the crew quarters at the Operations and Checkout Building after returning from Space Shuttle Endeavour at Launch Pad 39A. The launch of STS-111 was scrubbed due to poor weather at KSC. STS-111 is the second Utilization Flight to the International Space Station, carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo, the Mobile Base System (MBS), and a replacement wrist/roll joint for the Canadarm 2. Also on board will be the Expedition Five crew who will replace Expedition Four on the Station. Launch is rescheduled for May 31 at 7:22 p.m. EDT KSC-02pd0842

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Expedition 5 Commander Valery Korzun (RSA) steps down from the Astrovan outside the crew quarters at the Operations and Checkout Building after returning from Space Shuttle Endeavour at Launch Pad 39A. The launch of STS-111 was scrubbed due to poor weather at KSC. STS-111 is the second Utilization Flight to the International Space Station, carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo, the Mobile Base System (MBS), and a replacement wrist/roll joint for the Canadarm 2. Also on board will be the Expedition Five crew who will replace Expedition Four on the Station. Launch is rescheduled for May 31 at 7:22 p.m. EDT KSC-02pd0844

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-111 Mission Specialist Philippe Perrin (CNES) steps down from the Astrovan outside the crew quarters at the Operations and Checkout Building after returning from Space Shuttle Endeavour at Launch Pad 39A. The launch of STS-111 was scrubbed due to poor weather at KSC. STS-111 is the second Utilization Flight to the International Space Station, carrying the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo, the Mobile Base System (MBS), and a replacement wrist/roll joint for the Canadarm 2. Also on board will be the Expedition Five crew who will replace Expedition Four on the Station. Launch is rescheduled for May 31 at 7:22 p.m. EDT KSC-02pd0843

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-111 and Expedition 5 crews head for the Astrovan to take them to Launch Pad 39A and the second launch attempt aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour. From left to right, front to back, are Mission Specialists Philippe Perrin (CNES) and Franklin Chang-Diaz; Expedition 5 Commander Valeri Korzun, astronaut Peggy Whitson and cosmonaut Sergei Treschev; Pilot Paul Lockhart and Commander Kenneth Cockrell. This mission marks the 14th Shuttle flight to the Space Station and the third Shuttle mission this year. Mission STS-111 is the 18th flight of Endeavour and the 110th flight overall in NASA's Space Shuttle program. On mission STS-111, astronauts will deliver the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module, the Mobile Base System (MBS), and the Expedition Five crew to the Space Station. During the seven days Endeavour will be docked to the Station, three spacewalks will be performed dedicated to installing MBS and the replacement wrist-roll joint on the Station's Canadarm2 robotic arm. Endeavour will also carry the Expedition 5 crew, who will replace Expedition 4 on board the Station. Expedition 4 crew members will return to Earth with the STS-111 crew. Liftoff is scheduled for 5:22 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A KSC-02pd0888

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-112 crew heads for the Astrovan and a ride to the launch pad for a simulated countdown. From left are Mission Specialists Fyodor Yurchikhin (RSA), David Wolf and Piers Sellers; Pilot Pamela Melroy; Mission Specialist Sandra Magnus; and Commander Jeffrey Ashby. Mission STS-112 aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to launch no earlier than Oct. 2, between 2 and 6 p.m. EDT. STS-112 is the 15th assembly mission to the International Space Station. Atlantis will be carrying the S1 Integrated Truss Structure, the first starboard truss segment, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0, and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future spacewalking astronauts. KSC-02pd1344

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Still waving at spectators, the STS-112 crew heads for the Astrovan that will take them to Launch Pad 39B and Space Shuttle Atlantis. Liftoff is scheduled for 3:46 p.m. EDT. From left are Mission Specialists Fyodor Yurchikhin David Wolf, and Piers Sellers; Pilot Pamela Melroy; Mission Specialist Sandra Magnus; and Commander Jeffrey Ashby. Sellers, Magnus and Yurchikhin are making their first Shuttle flights. STS-112 is the 15th assembly flight to the International Space Station, carrying the S1 Integrated Truss Structure, the first starboard truss segment, to be attached to the central truss segment, S0, and the Crew and Equipment Translation Aid (CETA) Cart A. The CETA is the first of two human-powered carts that will ride along the ISS railway, providing mobile work platforms for future spacewalking astronauts. On the 11-day mission, three spacewalks are planned to attach the S1 truss to the Station. KSC-02pd1452

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-113 and Expedition 6 crews head for the Astrovan to take them to Launch Pad 39A for a simulated launch countdown. From left are STS-113 Mission Specialist Michael Lopez-Alegria, Expedition 6 astronaut Donald Pettit and cosmonaut Nikolai Budarin, Mission Specialist John Herrington and Pilot Paul Lockhart, Expedition 6 Commander Ken Bowersox and STS-113 Commander James Wetherbee. . The countdown is part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities prior to launch. The 16th assembly flight to the International Space Station, STS-113 will carry the Port 1 (P1) truss aboard Space Shuttle Endeavour as well as the Expedition 6 crew, who will replace Expedition 5 on the Station. Mission STS-113 is scheduled to launch Nov. 10, 2002. KSC-02pd1612

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Accompanied by astronaut Kent Rominger (far left), STS-112 crew members head for the Astrovan after exiting the crew transport vehicle and greeting the spectators. In the center is Mission Specialist Fyodor Yurchikhin; at right is Mission Specialist David Wolf. The flawless landing of Atlantis on Runway 33 at KSC completed a 4.5-million-mile journey to the International Space Station. Main gear touchdown occurred at 11:43:40 a.m. EDT; nose gear touchdown at 11:43:48 a.m.; and wheel stop at 11:44:35 a.m. Mission elapsed time was 10:19:58:44. Mission STS-112 expanded the size of the Station with the addition of the S1 truss segment. KSC-02pd1592

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-113 and Expedition 6 crews head for the Astrovan that will take them to Launch Pad 39A and Space Shuttle Endeavour. In the foreground, from left to right, are Mission Specialist John Herrington, Pilot Paul Lockhart and Expedition 6 Commander Ken Bowersox. In the back, from left to right, are Expedition 6 flight engineers Donald Pettit and Nikolai Budarin, Mission Specialist Michael Lopez-Alegria and Commander James Wetherbee. The primary mission is bringing the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and returning the Expedition 5 crew to Earth. The major objective of the mission is delivery of the Port 1 (P1) Integrated Truss Assembly, which will be attached to the port side of the S0 truss. Three spacewalks are planned to install and activate the truss and its associated equipment. Launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-113 is scheduled for Nov. 11 at 12:58 a.m. EST. KSC-02pd1707

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-113 and Expedition 6 crews head for the Astrovan to transport them to Launch Pad 39A and Space Shuttle Endeavour. In the foreground, from left, are Mission Specialist Michael Lopez-Alegria and John Herrington, and Expedition 6 Commander Ken Bowersox. In the background, from left, are Expedition 6 flight engineers Donald Pettit and Nikolai Budarin, Pilot Paul Lockhart and Commander James Wetherbee. The primary mission for the crew is bringing the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and returning the Expedition 5 crew to Earth. The major objective of the mission is delivery of the Port 1 (P1) Integrated Truss Assembly, which will be attached to the port side of the S0 truss. Three spacewalks are planned to install and activate the truss and its associated equipment. Launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-113 is scheduled for Nov. 22, 2002, at 8:15 p.m. EST. KSC-02pd1790

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Waving at spectators, the STS-113 and Expedition 6 crews head for the Astrovan that will transport them to Launch Pad 39A and Space Shuttle Endeavour for a second launch attempt. The launch on Nov. 22 was scrubbed due to poor weather conditions at the Transoceanic Abort Landing sites. In the foreground, from left, are Mission Specialists John Herrington and Michael Lopez-Alegria, and Expedition 6 Commander Ken Bowersox; in the background, from left, are Expedition 6 flight engineers Donald Pettit and Nikolai Budarin, Mission Pilot Paul Lockhart and Commander James Wetherbee. The launch will carry the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return the Expedition 5 crew to Earth. The major objective of the mission is delivery of the Port 1 (P1) Integrated Truss Assembly, which will be attached to the port side of the S0 truss. Three spacewalks are planned to install and activate the truss and its associated equipment. Launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-113 is now scheduled for Nov. 23 at 7:50 p.m. EST. KSC-02pd1799

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-113 and Expedition 6 crews head for the Astrovan that will transport them to Launch Pad 39A and Space Shuttle Endeavour for a second launch attempt. The launch on Nov. 22 was scrubbed due to poor weather conditions at the Transoceanic Abort Landing sites. From left are Expedition 6 flight engineer Donald Pettit; a security guard; Expedition 6 flight engineer Nikolai Budarin; Mission Specialists John Herrington and Michael Lopez-Alegria, Pilot Paul Lockhart and Commander James Wetherbee (background); and Expedition 6 Commander Ken Bowersox. The launch will carry the Expedition 6 crew to the Station and return the Expedition 5 crew to Earth. The major objective of the mission is delivery of the Port 1 (P1) Integrated Truss Assembly, which will be attached to the port side of the S0 truss. Three spacewalks are planned to install and activate the truss and its associated equipment. Launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-113 is now scheduled for Nov. 23 at 7:50 p.m. EST. [Photo by Scott Andrews] KSC-02pd1802

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The STS-107 crew heads for the Astrovan and a ride to Launch Pad 39A for a simulated launch countdown. From left are Payload Specialist Ilan Ramon, Mission Specialist Kalpana Chawla, Payload Commander Michael Anderson, Mission Specialist David Brown, Pilot William "Willie" McCool, Mission Specialist Laurel Clark and Commander Rick Husband. The countdown is part of Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test activities. STS-107 is a mission devoted to research and will include more than 80 experiments that will study Earth and space science, advanced technology development, and astronaut health and safety. Launch is planned for Jan. 16, 2003, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. EST aboard Space Shuttle Columbia. . KSC-02pd1987

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- The STS-107 crew heads for the Astrovan and a ride to Launch Pad 39A for liftoff. From left to right are Payload Commander Michael Anderson, Mission Specialist David Brown, Payload Specialist Ilan Ramon, Mission Specialists Laurel Clark and Kalpana Chawla, Mission Commandaer Rick Husband and Pilot William "Willie" McCool. Ramon is the first astronaut from Israel to fly on a Shuttle. The 16-day mission is devoted to research and will include more than 80 experiments that will study Earth and space science, advanced technology development, and astronaut health and safety. The payload on Space Shuttle Columbia includes FREESTAR (Fast Reaction Experiments Enabling Science, Technology, Applications and Research) and the SHI Research Double Module (SHI/RDM), known as SPACEHAB. Experiments on the module range from material sciences to life sciences. Liftoff is scheduled for 10:39 a.m. EST. [Photo courtesy of Scott Andrews] KSC-03pd0110

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The STS-107 crew heads for the Astrovan and a ride to Launch Pad 39A for liftoff. In front, left to right, are Payload Specialist Ilan Ramon, Mission Specialist Kalpana Chawla and Pilot William "Willie" McCool; behind them, left to right, are Payload Commander Michael Anderson, Mission Specialists David Brown and Laurel Clark, and Mission Commander Rick Husband. Ramon is the first astronaut from Israel to fly on a Shuttle. The 16-day mission is devoted to research and will include more than 80 experiments that will study Earth and space science, advanced technology development, and astronaut health and safety. The payload on Space Shuttle Columbia includes FREESTAR (Fast Reaction Experiments Enabling Science, Technology, Applications and Research) and the SHI Research Double Module (SHI/RDM), known as SPACEHAB. Experiments on the module range from material sciences to life sciences. Liftoff is scheduled for 10:39 a.m. EST. KSC-03pd0108

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The STS-121 crew eagerly walks to the Astrovan for the ride to Launch Pad 39B and launch of Space Shuttle Discovery. On the left column from back to front are Mission Specialists Stephanie Wilson and Lisa Nowak and Pilot Mark Kelly. On the right column from back to front are Mission Specialists Thomas Reiter, Piers Sellers and Michael Fossum, with Commander Steven Lindsey leading the way. The launch is the 115th shuttle flight and the 18th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the 12-day mission, the STS-121 crew will test new equipment and procedures to improve shuttle safety, as well as deliver supplies and make repairs to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1329

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - For the second time in two days, the STS-121 crew heads for the Astrovan to take them to Launch Pad 39B and launch of Space Shuttle Discovery. On the left side, from left, are Mission Specialists Stephanie Wilson and Lisa Nowak, and Pilot Mark Kelly. On the right side, left to right, are Mission Specialists Thomas Reiter, Piers Sellers and Michael Fossum, and Commander Steven Lindsey. The first launch attempt July 1 was scrubbed due to weather concerns and postponed 24 hours. The launch is the 115th shuttle flight and the 18th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the 12-day mission, the STS-121 crew will test new equipment and procedures to improve shuttle safety, as well as deliver supplies and make repairs to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1379

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Waving flags for the Fourth of July, the STS-121 crew heads for the Astrovan and the ride to Launch Pad 39B for a third launch attempt. Leading the way are Pilot Mark Kelly (left) and Commander Steven Lindsey (right). Behind them are, left and right, Mission Specialists (second row) Lisa Nowak and Michael Fossum; (third row) Stephanie Wilson and Piers Sellers; and (at the rear) Thomas Reiter, who represents the European Space Agency. The July 2 launch attempt was scrubbed due to the presence of showers and thunderstorms within the surrounding area of the launch site. The launch of Space Shuttle Discovery on mission STS-121 is the 115th shuttle flight and the 18th U.S. flight to the International Space Station. During the 12-day mission, the STS-121 crew will test new equipment and procedures to improve shuttle safety, as well as deliver supplies and make repairs to the International Space Station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd1405