PICRYL
PICRYL

The World's Largest Public Domain Source

  • homeHome
  • searchSearch
  • photo_albumStories
  • collectionsCollections
  • infoAbout

  • account_boxLogin

Sun spots sun solar flare, science technology.

Sun spots sun solar flare, science technology.

Sun solar flare uv, science technology.

Sun solar flare uv, science technology.

Sun solar flare sunlight, science technology.

Sun solar flare sunlight, science technology.

Space capsule apollo program lander, science technology.

Space capsule apollo program lander, science technology.

Solar flare sunlight eruption, science technology.

Solar flare sunlight eruption, science technology.

Sun solar flare sunlight, science technology.

Sun solar flare sunlight, science technology.

Rocket fuel tanks usa, science technology.

Rocket fuel tanks usa, science technology.

Sun solar flare uv, science technology.

Sun solar flare uv, science technology.

Sun solar flare sunlight, science technology.

Sun solar flare sunlight, science technology.

Sun solar flare sunlight, science technology.

Sun solar flare sunlight, science technology.

Sun solar flare uv, science technology.

Sun solar flare uv, science technology.

Sun fireball solar flare, science technology.

Sun fireball solar flare, science technology.

Sun solar flare sunlight, science technology.

Sun solar flare sunlight, science technology.

The members of the House Committee on Science and Astronautics visited the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) on March 9, 1962 to gather firsthand information of the nation's space exploration program. The congressional group was composed of members of the Subcommittee on Manned Space Flight. They were briefed on MSFC's manned space efforts earlier in the day and then inspected mockups of the Saturn I Workshop and the Apollo Telescope Mount, two projects developed by MSFC for the post-Apollo program. Pictured left-to-right are Dieter Grau, MSFC; Konrad Dannenberg, MSFC; James G. Fulton, Republican representative for Pennsylvania; Joe Waggoner, Democratic representative for Louisiana; and Dr. Wernher von Braun, Director of MSFC. n/a

The members of the House Committee on Science and Astronautics visited the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) on March 9, 1962 to gather firsthand information of the nation's space exploration program. The congressional group was composed of members of the Subcommittee on Manned Space Flight. They were briefed on MSFC's manned space efforts earlier in the day and then inspected mockups of the Saturn I Workshop and the Apollo Telescope Mount, two projects developed by MSFC for the post-Apollo program. Pictured left-to-right are Dieter Grau, MSFC; Konrad Dannenberg, MSFC; James G. Fulton, Republican representative for Pennsylvania; Joe Waggoner, Democratic representative for Louisiana; and Dr. Wernher von Braun, Director of MSFC. n/a

An aerial view of the Navy Astronautics Group, Detachment Charlie

An aerial view of the Navy Astronautics Group, Detachment Charlie

AIAA - AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF AERONAUTICS AND ASTRONAUTICS - STUDENT FROM OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY COLUMBUS OHIO

AIAA - AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF AERONAUTICS AND ASTRONAUTICS - STUDENT FROM OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY COLUMBUS OHIO

AIAA AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF AERONAUTICS AND ASTRONAUTICS

AIAA AMERICAN INSTITUTE  OF AERONAUTICS AND ASTRONAUTICS

AIAA AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF AERONAUTICS AND ASTRONAUTICS

AIAA AMERICAN INSTITUTE  OF AERONAUTICS AND ASTRONAUTICS

Robert Chapman, a civilian research chemist with the Aerospace Launched Missile Branch of the Air Force Astronautics Laboratory, mixes a solution from behind a sealed environmental barrier

Robert Chapman, a civilian research chemist with the Aerospace Launched Missile Branch of the Air Force Astronautics Laboratory, mixes a solution from behind a sealed environmental barrier

CAPT. Mark Borkowski, chief of the Aerospace Launched Missile Branch of the Air Force Astronautics Laboratory, explains a cutaway scale model of a rocket motor nozzle

CAPT. Mark Borkowski, chief of the Aerospace Launched Missile Branch of the Air Force Astronautics Laboratory, explains a cutaway scale model of a rocket motor nozzle

STAFF SGT. Scott F. Strader, a research and development mechanic at the Air Force Astronautics Laboratory, collects a sample of solid rocket motor proellant from a mixing blade

STAFF SGT. Scott F. Strader, a research and development mechanic at the Air Force Astronautics Laboratory, collects a sample of solid rocket motor proellant from a mixing blade

Tom Owens, a civilian physical scientist with the Aerospace Launched Missile Branch of the Air Force Astronautics Laboratory, checks the progress of his analyses at his work station

Tom Owens, a civilian physical scientist with the Aerospace Launched Missile Branch of the Air Force Astronautics Laboratory, checks the progress of his analyses at his work station

STAFF Sergeant Darryl Zinzow, a composites with the Aerospace Launched Missile Branch of the Air Force Astronautics Laboratory, examines a spool of material

STAFF Sergeant Darryl Zinzow, a composites with the Aerospace Launched Missile Branch of the Air Force Astronautics Laboratory, examines a spool of material

An aerial view of the Navy Astronautics Group site, Detachment ALFA

An aerial view of the Navy Astronautics Group site, Detachment ALFA

SSGT Jeffrey Dodson, left, TSGT Gary Cade, center, and SGT Steve Chabotte assemble a mirror bracket in an Air Force Astronautics Laboratory test facility. Laser research related to the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) is conducted by some of the laboratory's personnel

SSGT Jeffrey Dodson, left, TSGT Gary Cade, center, and SGT Steve Chabotte assemble a mirror bracket in an Air Force Astronautics Laboratory test facility. Laser research related to the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) is conducted by some of the laboratory's personnel

A Lockheed Martin Astronautics Atlas I space launch vehicle, designated AC-121, sits poised on launch complex 36B at the Cape. Missile is ready to carry the Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) into orbit

A Lockheed Martin Astronautics Atlas I space launch vehicle, designated AC-121, sits poised on launch complex 36B at the Cape. Missile is ready to carry the Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) into orbit

A Lockheed Martin Astronautics Atlas II AS/AC-121 was successfully launched from complex 36B at 3:08 am (EST) from the Cape. The expendable launch vehicle was carrying the Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) into orbit

A Lockheed Martin Astronautics Atlas II AS/AC-121 was successfully launched from complex 36B at 3:08 am (EST) from the Cape. The expendable launch vehicle was carrying the Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) into orbit

A commercial Lockheed Martin Astronautics IIA Space Launch Vehicle, designated 120, carrying the Galaxy III-R broadcast satellite was successfully launched from Space Launch Complex 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, Florida, at 1923 hrs, EST

A commercial Lockheed Martin Astronautics IIA Space Launch Vehicle, designated 120, carrying the Galaxy III-R broadcast satellite was successfully launched from Space Launch Complex 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, Florida, at 1923 hrs, EST

A commercial Lockheed Martin Astronautics IIA Space Launch Vehicle, designated 120, carrying the Galaxy III-R broadcast satellite sits poised on Space Launch Complex 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, in preparation for flight

A commercial Lockheed Martin Astronautics IIA Space Launch Vehicle, designated 120, carrying the Galaxy III-R broadcast satellite sits poised on Space Launch Complex 36A, Cape Canaveral Air Station, in preparation for flight

The first Atlas launch from the Eastern Range for 1996 successfully lifted off from CX 36B, at 8:15 p.m. EST. The Lockheed Martin Astronautics Atlas IIAS, designated AC-126, was carrying the Palapa C1 communications satellite

The first Atlas launch from the Eastern Range for 1996 successfully lifted off from CX 36B, at 8:15 p.m. EST. The Lockheed Martin Astronautics Atlas IIAS, designated AC-126, was carrying the Palapa C1 communications satellite

A Lockheed Martin Astronautics Atlas IIAS space launch vehicle designated AC-126, carrying the Palapa C1 communications satellite sits poised on launch complex 36B in preparation for the first Atlas launch from the Eastern Range for 1996

A Lockheed Martin Astronautics Atlas IIAS space launch vehicle designated AC-126, carrying the Palapa C1 communications satellite sits poised on launch complex 36B in preparation for the first Atlas launch from the Eastern Range for 1996

Air Force and Lockheed Martin Astronautics launch team crews prepared this Atlas IIA Space Launch vehicle, designated AC-122, to carry the INMARSAT-3 1F Communications Satellite into orbit on Wednesday from Complex 36A

Air Force and Lockheed Martin Astronautics launch team crews prepared this Atlas IIA Space Launch vehicle, designated AC-122, to carry the INMARSAT-3 1F Communications Satellite into orbit on Wednesday from Complex 36A

Air Force and Lockheed Martin Astronautics launch team crews successfully launched this Atlas IIA space launch vehicle designated AC-122 on April 3, 1996 at 06:01 p.m., EST from Complex 36A. This Atlas IIA carried the INMARSAT-3 1F communications satellite

Air Force and Lockheed Martin Astronautics launch team crews successfully launched this Atlas IIA space launch vehicle designated AC-122 on April 3, 1996 at 06:01 p.m., EST from Complex 36A. This Atlas IIA carried the INMARSAT-3 1F communications satellite

The Air Force and Lockheed Martin astronautics launch team successfully launched the Atlas II Space Launch Vehicle, designated AC-125, carrying a Hughes Space and Communications Ultra High Frequency Follow On F-7 satellite. The launch took place at 0824 hours

The Air Force and Lockheed Martin astronautics launch team successfully launched the Atlas II Space Launch Vehicle, designated AC-125, carrying a Hughes Space and Communications Ultra High Frequency Follow On F-7 satellite. The launch took place at 0824 hours

The United States Air Force and Lockheed Martin Astronautics Launch Teams are in final preparation to ready an ATLAS II Space Launch Vehicle to carry an Eutelsat Hot Bird 2 television satellite from Complex 36B. Liftoff is scheduled for 3:47 P.M. EST. today

The United States Air Force and Lockheed Martin Astronautics Launch Teams are in final preparation to ready an ATLAS II Space Launch Vehicle to carry an Eutelsat Hot Bird 2 television satellite from Complex 36B. Liftoff is scheduled for 3:47 P.M. EST. today

The Air Force and Lockheed Martin Astronautics Launch Team successsfully launch the ATLAS IIA Space Launch Vehicle, designated AC-124 and carrying a Eutelsat Hot Bird 2 television satellite, from Space Launch Complex 36B today at 3:47 P.M. EST

The Air Force and Lockheed Martin Astronautics Launch Team successsfully launch the ATLAS IIA Space Launch Vehicle, designated AC-124 and carrying a Eutelsat Hot Bird 2 television satellite, from Space Launch Complex 36B today at 3:47 P.M. EST

STS-83 Payload Commander Janice Voss smiles as she is assisted into her launch/entry suit in the Operations and checkout (O&C) Building. She has flown on STS-63 and STS-57. Voss holds a doctorate degree in aeronautics/astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and has earned two NASA Space Flight Medals. As Payload Commander and a member of the Blue team, Voss will have overall responsibility for the operation of all of the MSL-1 experiments. During the experimentation phase of the mission, she will be working primarily with three combustion experiments. She and six fellow crew members will shortly depart the O&C and head for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Columbia will lift off during a launch window that opens at 2:00 p.m. EST, April 4 KSC-97pc567

STS-83 Payload Commander Janice Voss smiles as she is assisted into her launch/entry suit in the Operations and checkout (O&C) Building. She has flown on STS-63 and STS-57. Voss holds a doctorate degree in aeronautics/astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and has earned two NASA Space Flight Medals. As Payload Commander and a member of the Blue team, Voss will have overall responsibility for the operation of all of the MSL-1 experiments. During the experimentation phase of the mission, she will be working primarily with three combustion experiments. She and six fellow crew members will shortly depart the O&C and head for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Columbia will lift off during a launch window that opens at 2:00 p.m. EST, April 4 KSC-97pc567

A reconfigured Minuteman II intercontinental ballistic missile was launched from Vandenberg AFB at 8:39 p.m. 23 June 1997. The missile, part of the Multi-Service Launch System developed by Lockheed-Martin Astronautics, deployed a payload of nine target objects in space to test sensors carried aloft by a second Minuteman II that was launched from the Kwajalein Missile Range in the south Pacific Ocean approximately 20 minutes later. It carried sensors using existing National Missile Defense technology to identify and track the nine target objects released by the Vandenberg missile. A side effect from the launch resulted in what is termed as a "twilight phenomenon," a multicolored light...

A reconfigured Minuteman II intercontinental ballistic missile was launched from Vandenberg AFB at 8:39 p.m. 23 June 1997. The missile, part of the Multi-Service Launch System developed by Lockheed-Martin Astronautics, deployed a payload of nine target objects in space to test sensors carried aloft by a second Minuteman II that was launched from the Kwajalein Missile Range in the south Pacific Ocean approximately 20 minutes later. It carried sensors using existing National Missile Defense technology to identify and track the nine target objects released by the Vandenberg missile. A side effect from the launch resulted in what is termed as a "twilight phenomenon," a multicolored light...

STS-94 Payload Commander Janice Voss prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Columbia at Launch Pad 39A in preparation for launch. She has flown on STS-83, STS-63 and STS-57. Voss holds a doctorate degree in aeronautics/astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and has earned two NASA Space Flight Medals. As Payload Commander and a member of the Blue team, Voss will have overall responsibility for the operation of all of the MSL-1 experiments. During the experimentation phase of the mission, she be working primarily with three combustion experiments. She and six fellow crew members will lift off during a launch window that opens at 1:50 p.m. EDT, July 1. The launch window will open 47 minutes early to improve the opportunity to lift off before Florida summer rain showers reach the space center KSC-97PC970

STS-94 Payload Commander Janice Voss prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Columbia at Launch Pad 39A in preparation for launch.  She has flown on STS-83, STS-63 and STS-57. Voss holds a  doctorate degree in aeronautics/astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of  Technology and has earned two NASA Space Flight Medals. As Payload Commander and  a member of the Blue team, Voss will have overall responsibility for the operation of  all  of the  MSL-1  experiments. During the experimentation phase of the mission, she be  working primarily with three combustion experiments. She and six fellow crew members  will lift off  during a launch window that opens at 1:50 p.m. EDT,  July 1. The launch window will open 47 minutes early to improve the opportunity to  lift off before Florida summer rain showers reach the space center KSC-97PC970

STS-94 Payload Commander Janice Voss smiles and gives a thumbs-up as she is assisted into her launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building. She has flown on STS-83, STS-63 and STS-57. Voss holds a doctorate degree in aeronautics/astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and has earned two NASA Space Flight Medals. As Payload Commander and a member of the Blue team, Voss will have overall responsibility for the operation of all of the MSL-1 experiments. During the experimentation phase of the mission, she be working primarily with three combustion experiments. She and six fellow crew members will shortly depart the O&C and head for Launch Pad 39A, where the Space Shuttle Columbia will lift off during a launch window that opens at 1:50 p.m. EDT, July 1. The launch window was opened 47 minutes early to improve the opportunity to lift off before Florida summer rain showers reached the space center KSC-97PC955

STS-94 Payload Commander Janice Voss smiles  and gives a thumbs-up as she is assisted into her launch/entry suit in the Operations and  Checkout (O&C) Building. She has flown on STS-83, STS-63 and STS-57. Voss holds a  doctorate degree in aeronautics/astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of  Technology and has earned two NASA Space Flight Medals. As Payload Commander and  a member of the Blue team, Voss will have overall responsibility for the operation of  all  of the  MSL-1  experiments. During the experimentation phase of the mission, she be  working primarily with three combustion experiments. She and six fellow crew members  will shortly depart the O&C and head for Launch Pad 39A, where the  Space Shuttle  Columbia will lift off  during a launch window that opens at 1:50 p.m. EDT,  July 1. The launch window was opened 47 minutes early to improve the opportunity to  lift off before Florida summer rain showers reached the space center KSC-97PC955

United States Senator Bob Graham of Florida announces important new federal legislation designed to support the nation's continued space industry development. The announcement was made at Launch Complex 46 at the Cape Canaveral Air Station, the dual-use Navy facility recently modified for commercial launches by the State of Florida. In the background, from left to right, are Hugh Brown, Chairman, Spaceport Florida Authority; Charles Johnson, Athena Program Manager, Lockheed Martin Astronautics; and Col. Ron Larivee, Vice Commander, 45th Space Wing KSC-97PC1763

United States Senator Bob Graham of Florida announces important new federal legislation designed to support the nation's continued space industry development. The announcement was made at Launch Complex 46 at the Cape Canaveral Air Station, the dual-use Navy facility recently modified for commercial launches by the State of Florida. In the background, from left to right, are Hugh Brown, Chairman, Spaceport Florida Authority; Charles Johnson, Athena Program Manager, Lockheed Martin Astronautics; and Col. Ron Larivee, Vice Commander, 45th Space Wing KSC-97PC1763

The Mars Climate Orbiter spacecraft is moved onto a flatbed for transport to the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2). It arrived at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard an Air Force C-17 cargo plane early this morning following its flight from the Lockheed Martin Astronautics plant in Denver, Colo. When it arrives at the red planet, the Mars Climate Orbiter will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (1.8 Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, on a Delta II 7425 rocket KSC-98pc1047

The Mars Climate Orbiter spacecraft is moved onto a flatbed for transport to the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2). It arrived at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard an Air Force C-17 cargo plane early this morning following its flight from the Lockheed Martin Astronautics plant in Denver, Colo. When it arrives at the red planet, the Mars Climate Orbiter will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (1.8 Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, on a Delta II 7425 rocket KSC-98pc1047

The Mars Climate Orbiter spacecraft is moved into the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2) in KSC's industrial area. It arrived at the Shuttle Landing Facility aboard an Air Force C-17 cargo plane early this morning following its flight from the Lockheed Martin Astronautics plant in Denver, Colo. When it arrives at the red planet, the Mars Climate Orbiter will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (1.8 Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, on a Delta II 7425 rocket KSC-98pc1048

The Mars Climate Orbiter spacecraft is moved into the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2) in KSC's industrial area. It arrived at the Shuttle Landing Facility aboard an Air Force C-17 cargo plane early this morning following its flight from the Lockheed Martin Astronautics plant in Denver, Colo. When it arrives at the red planet, the Mars Climate Orbiter will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (1.8 Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, on a Delta II 7425 rocket KSC-98pc1048

The Mars Climate Orbiter spacecraft arrives at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard an Air Force C-17 cargo plane early this morning following its flight from the Lockheed Martin Astronautics plant in Denver, Colo. When the spacecraft arrives at the red planet, it will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (1.8 Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, on a Delta II 7425 rocket KSC-98pc1046

The Mars Climate Orbiter spacecraft arrives at KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility aboard an Air Force C-17 cargo plane early this morning following its flight from the Lockheed Martin Astronautics plant in Denver, Colo. When the spacecraft arrives at the red planet, it will primarily support its companion Mars Polar Lander spacecraft, planned for launch on Jan. 3, 1999. After that, the Mars Climate Orbiter's instruments will monitor the Martian atmosphere and image the planet's surface on a daily basis for one Martian year (1.8 Earth years). It will observe the appearance and movement of atmospheric dust and water vapor, as well as characterize seasonal changes on the surface. The detailed images of the surface features will provide important clues to the planet's early climate history and give scientists more information about possible liquid water reserves beneath the surface. The scheduled launch date for the Mars Climate Orbiter is Dec. 10, 1998, on a Delta II 7425 rocket KSC-98pc1046

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility, the Mars Polar Lander is rolled from the Air Force C-17 cargo plane that carried it from the Lockheed Martin Astronautics plant in Denver, CO. The Mars Polar Lander is targeted for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1197

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility, the Mars Polar Lander is rolled from the Air Force C-17 cargo plane that carried it from the Lockheed Martin Astronautics plant in Denver, CO. The Mars Polar Lander is targeted for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere KSC-98pc1197

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility, the Mars Polar Lander is loaded onto a truck after its flight aboard an Air Force C-17 cargo plane that carried it from the Lockheed Martin Astronautics plant in Denver, CO. The lander is being transported to the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2(SAEF-2) in the KSC Industrial Area for testing, including a functional test of the science instruments and the basic spacecraft subsystems. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. The Mars Polar Lander spacecraft is planned for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999 KSC-98pc1196

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility, the Mars Polar Lander is loaded onto a truck after its flight aboard an Air Force C-17 cargo plane that carried it from the Lockheed Martin Astronautics plant in Denver, CO. The lander is being transported to the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2(SAEF-2) in the KSC Industrial Area for testing, including a functional test of the science instruments and the basic spacecraft subsystems. The solar-powered spacecraft is designed to touch down on the Martian surface near the northern-most boundary of the south pole in order to study the water cycle there. The lander also will help scientists learn more about climate change and current resources on Mars, studying such things as frost, dust, water vapor and condensates in the Martian atmosphere. The Mars Polar Lander spacecraft is planned for launch from Cape Canaveral Air Station aboard a Delta II rocket on Jan. 3, 1999 KSC-98pc1196

In the Payload Hazardous Service Facility, workers lift the cover that protected the Stardust spacecraft during its journey. Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. The collected samples will return to Earth in a re-entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by in January 2006 KSC-98pc1630

In the Payload Hazardous Service Facility, workers lift the cover that protected the Stardust spacecraft during its journey. Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. The collected samples will return to Earth in a re-entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by in January 2006 KSC-98pc1630

In the Payload Hazardous Service Facility, workers begin checking the Stardust spacecraft after removing its protective cover. The spacecraft will undergo installation and testing of the solar arrays, plus final installation and testing of spacecraft instruments followed by an overall spacecraft functional test. Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. The collected samples will return to Earth in a re-entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-98pc1637

In the Payload Hazardous Service Facility, workers begin checking the Stardust spacecraft after removing its protective cover. The spacecraft will undergo installation and testing of the solar arrays, plus final installation and testing of spacecraft instruments followed by an overall spacecraft functional test. Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. The collected samples will return to Earth in a re-entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-98pc1637

In the Payload Hazardous Service Facility, workers check the placement of the Stardust spacecraft's workstand in the high bay. The spacecraft will undergo installation and testing of the solar arrays, plus final installation and testing of spacecraft instruments followed by an overall spacecraft functional test. Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 20004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. The collected samples will return to Earth in a re-entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-98pc1635

In the Payload Hazardous Service Facility, workers check the placement of the Stardust spacecraft's workstand in the high bay. The spacecraft will undergo installation and testing of the solar arrays, plus final installation and testing of spacecraft instruments followed by an overall spacecraft functional test. Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 20004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. The collected samples will return to Earth in a re-entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-98pc1635

In the Payload Hazardous Service Facility, workers oversee the arrival of the crated Stardust spacecraft. Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. The collected samples will return to Earth in a re-entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by in January 2006 KSC-98pc1624

In the Payload Hazardous Service Facility, workers oversee the arrival of the crated Stardust spacecraft. Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. The collected samples will return to Earth in a re-entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by in January 2006 KSC-98pc1624

In the Payload Hazardous Service Facility, a worker prepares the Stardust spacecraft for its transfer to . Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. . The collected samples will return to Earth in a re-entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by in January 2006 KSC-98pc1632

In the Payload Hazardous Service Facility, a worker prepares the Stardust spacecraft for its transfer to . Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. . The collected samples will return to Earth in a re-entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by in January 2006 KSC-98pc1632

At the Shuttle Landing Facility, workers unload the crated Stardust spacecraft from the airplane before transporting to the Payload Hazardous Service Facility. Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. The collected samples will return to Earth in a re-entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by in January 2006 KSC-98pc1622

At the Shuttle Landing Facility, workers unload the crated Stardust spacecraft from the airplane before transporting to the Payload Hazardous Service Facility. Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. The collected samples will return to Earth in a re-entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by in January 2006 KSC-98pc1622

The Stardust spacecraft sits in the Payload Hazardous Service Facility waiting to undergo installation and testing of the solar arrays, plus final installation and testing of spacecraft instruments followed by an overall spacecraft functional test. At the top is the re-entry capsule. Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. The collected samples will return to Earth in the re-entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-98pc1639

The Stardust spacecraft sits in the Payload Hazardous Service Facility waiting to undergo installation and testing of the solar arrays, plus final installation and testing of spacecraft instruments followed by an overall spacecraft functional test. At the top is the re-entry capsule. Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. The collected samples will return to Earth in the re-entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-98pc1639

In the Payload Hazardous Service Facility, workers begin removing the protective plastic covering of the Stardust spacecraft. The spacecraft will undergo installation and testing of the solar arrays, plus final installation and testing of spacecraft instruments followed by an overall spacecraft functional test. Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 20004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. The collected samples will return to Earth in a re-entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-98pc1636

In the Payload Hazardous Service Facility, workers begin removing the protective plastic covering of the Stardust spacecraft. The spacecraft will undergo installation and testing of the solar arrays, plus final installation and testing of spacecraft instruments followed by an overall spacecraft functional test. Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 20004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. The collected samples will return to Earth in a re-entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-98pc1636

In the Payload Hazardous Service Facility, workers lower the Stardust spacecraft onto a workstand. The spacecraft will undergo installation and testing of the solar arrays, plus final installation and testing of spacecraft instruments followed by an overall spacecraft functional test. Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. The collected samples will return to Earth in a re-entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-98pc1633

In the Payload Hazardous Service Facility, workers lower the Stardust spacecraft onto a workstand. The spacecraft will undergo installation and testing of the solar arrays, plus final installation and testing of spacecraft instruments followed by an overall spacecraft functional test. Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. The collected samples will return to Earth in a re-entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-98pc1633

In the Payload Hazardous Service Facility, the Stardust spacecraft sits wrapped in plastic covering. Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles and interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. The collected samples will return to Earth in a re-entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-98pc1631

In the Payload Hazardous Service Facility, the Stardust spacecraft sits wrapped in plastic covering. Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles and interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. The collected samples will return to Earth in a re-entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-98pc1631

The Stardust spacecraft sits in the Payload Hazardous Service Facility waiting to undergo installation and testing of the solar arrays, plus final installation and testing of spacecraft instruments followed by an overall spacecraft functional test. At the top is the re-entry capsule. Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. The collected samples will return to Earth in the re-entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-98pc1640

The Stardust spacecraft sits in the Payload Hazardous Service Facility waiting to undergo installation and testing of the solar arrays, plus final installation and testing of spacecraft instruments followed by an overall spacecraft functional test. At the top is the re-entry capsule. Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. The collected samples will return to Earth in the re-entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-98pc1640

In the Payload Hazardous Service Facility, workers move the Stardust spacecraft on its workstand from the air lock to the high bay. The spacecraft will undergo installation and testing of the solar arrays, plus final installation and testing of spacecraft instruments followed by an overall spacecraft functional test. Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. The collected samples will return to Earth in a re-entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-98pc1634

In the Payload Hazardous Service Facility, workers move the Stardust spacecraft on its workstand from the air lock to the high bay. The spacecraft will undergo installation and testing of the solar arrays, plus final installation and testing of spacecraft instruments followed by an overall spacecraft functional test. Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. The collected samples will return to Earth in a re-entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-98pc1634

In the Payload Hazardous Service Facility, a worker looks over the re-entry capsule on top of the Stardust spacecraft. The spacecraft will undergo installation and testing of the solar arrays, plus final installation and testing of spacecraft instruments followed by an overall spacecraft functional test. Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. The collected samples will return to Earth in the re-entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-98pc1638

In the Payload Hazardous Service Facility, a worker looks over the re-entry capsule on top of the Stardust spacecraft. The spacecraft will undergo installation and testing of the solar arrays, plus final installation and testing of spacecraft instruments followed by an overall spacecraft functional test. Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. The collected samples will return to Earth in the re-entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by Earth in January 2006 KSC-98pc1638

After arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility in the early morning hours, the crated Stardust spacecraft waits to be unloaded from the aircraft. Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. The collected samples will return to Earth in a re-entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by in January 2006 KSC-98pc1621

After arrival at the Shuttle Landing Facility in the early morning hours, the crated Stardust spacecraft waits to be unloaded from the aircraft. Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. The collected samples will return to Earth in a re-entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by in January 2006 KSC-98pc1621

At the Shuttle Landing Facility, workers observe the loading of the crated Stardust spacecraft onto a trailer for transporting to the Payload Hazardous Service Facility. Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 20004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. The collected samples will return to Earth in a re-entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by in January 2006 KSC-98pc1623

At the Shuttle Landing Facility, workers observe the loading of the crated Stardust spacecraft onto a trailer for transporting to the Payload Hazardous Service Facility. Built by Lockheed Martin Astronautics near Denver, Colo., for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NASA, the spacecraft Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 20004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. Stardust will be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, targeted for Feb. 6, 1999. The collected samples will return to Earth in a re-entry capsule to be jettisoned from Stardust as it swings by in January 2006 KSC-98pc1623

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, Randy Scott (left) and Pat Wedeman (right), with Lockheed Martin Astronautics, check the insulation material on the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm">Stardust</a> spacecraft. Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in the SRC to be jettisoned as it swings by Earth in January 2006. Stardust is scheduled to be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, on Feb. 6, 1999 KSC-98pc1894

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, Randy Scott (left) and Pat Wedeman (right), with Lockheed Martin Astronautics, check the insulation material on the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm">Stardust</a> spacecraft. Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in the SRC to be jettisoned as it swings by Earth in January 2006. Stardust is scheduled to be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, on Feb. 6, 1999 KSC-98pc1894

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, Randy Scott (left) and Pat Wedeman (right), with Lockheed Martin Astronautics, check the insulation on the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm">Stardust</a> spacecraft. Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in the SRC to be jettisoned as it swings by Earth in January 2006. Stardust is scheduled to be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, on Feb. 6, 1999 KSC-98pc1895

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, Randy Scott (left) and Pat Wedeman (right), with Lockheed Martin Astronautics, check the insulation on the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm">Stardust</a> spacecraft. Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in the SRC to be jettisoned as it swings by Earth in January 2006. Stardust is scheduled to be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, on Feb. 6, 1999 KSC-98pc1895

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, Randy Scott, with Lockheed Martin Astronautics, checks insulation material on the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm">Stardust</a> spacecraft. Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in the SRC to be jettisoned as it swings by Earth in January 2006. Stardust is scheduled to be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, on Feb. 6, 1999 KSC-98pc1892

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, Randy Scott, with Lockheed Martin Astronautics, checks insulation material on the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm">Stardust</a> spacecraft. Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in the SRC to be jettisoned as it swings by Earth in January 2006. Stardust is scheduled to be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, on Feb. 6, 1999 KSC-98pc1892

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, Randy Scott, with Lockheed Martin Astronautics, looks over the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm">Stardust</a> spacecraft after closeout. Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in the SRC to be jettisoned as it swings by Earth in January 2006. Stardust is scheduled to be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, on Feb. 6, 1999 KSC-98pc1897

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, Randy Scott, with Lockheed Martin Astronautics, looks over the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm">Stardust</a> spacecraft after closeout. Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in the SRC to be jettisoned as it swings by Earth in January 2006. Stardust is scheduled to be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, on Feb. 6, 1999 KSC-98pc1897

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, Randy Scott (left) and Pat Wedeman (right) , with Lockheed Martin Astronautics, insulate the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm">Stardust</a> spacecraft. Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in the SRC to be jettisoned as it swings by Earth in January 2006. Stardust is scheduled to be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, on Feb. 6, 1999 KSC-98pc1893

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, Randy Scott (left) and Pat Wedeman (right) , with Lockheed Martin Astronautics, insulate the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm">Stardust</a> spacecraft. Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in the SRC to be jettisoned as it swings by Earth in January 2006. Stardust is scheduled to be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, on Feb. 6, 1999 KSC-98pc1893

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, Randy Scott (left) and Linda Townsend (right), with Lockheed Martin Astronautics, make a final check of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm">Stardust</a> spacecraft. Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in the SRC to be jettisoned as it swings by Earth in January 2006. Stardust is scheduled to be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, on Feb. 6, 1999 KSC-98pc1896

In the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility, Randy Scott (left) and Linda Townsend (right), with Lockheed Martin Astronautics, make a final check of the <a href="http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/captions/subjects/stardust.htm">Stardust</a> spacecraft. Stardust will use a unique medium called aerogel to capture comet particles flying off the nucleus of comet Wild 2 in January 2004, plus collect interstellar dust for later analysis. The collected samples will return to Earth in the SRC to be jettisoned as it swings by Earth in January 2006. Stardust is scheduled to be launched aboard a Boeing Delta 7426 rocket from Complex 17, Cape Canaveral Air Station, on Feb. 6, 1999 KSC-98pc1896

Looking from the east, over the Atlantic Ocean, this aerial view shows the construction on Launch Complex 41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, previously used to launch 17 Titan III and 10 Titan IV rockets. Lockheed Martin Astronautics razed the old towers that supported their last Titan launch in April 1999 to make way for construction of this new Atlas V launch facility. The launch pad abuts the Atlantic Ocean on the east, seen here in the foreground. KSC-00PP-0432

Looking from the east, over the Atlantic Ocean, this aerial view shows the construction on Launch Complex 41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, previously used to launch 17 Titan III and 10 Titan IV rockets. Lockheed Martin Astronautics razed the old towers that supported their last Titan launch in April 1999 to make way for construction of this new Atlas V launch facility. The launch pad abuts the Atlantic Ocean on the east, seen here in the foreground. KSC-00PP-0432

This aerial view from the west looks over the construction on Launch Complex 41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, previously used to launch 17 Titan III and 10 Titan IV rockets. Lockheed Martin Astronautics razed the old towers that supported their last Titan launch in April 1999 to make way for construction of this new Atlas V launch facility. The launch pad abuts the Atlantic Ocean on the east, seen here in the background KSC00pp0430

This aerial view from the west looks over the construction on Launch Complex 41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, previously used to launch 17 Titan III and 10 Titan IV rockets. Lockheed Martin Astronautics razed the old towers that supported their last Titan launch in April 1999 to make way for construction of this new Atlas V launch facility. The launch pad abuts the Atlantic Ocean on the east, seen here in the background KSC00pp0430

This aerial view from the west looks over the construction on Launch Complex 41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, previously used to launch 17 Titan III and 10 Titan IV rockets. Lockheed Martin Astronautics razed the old towers that supported their last Titan launch in April 1999 to make way for construction of this new Atlas V launch facility. The launch pad abuts the Atlantic Ocean on the east, seen here in the background KSC-00pp0430

This aerial view from the west looks over the construction on Launch Complex 41, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, previously used to launch 17 Titan III and 10 Titan IV rockets. Lockheed Martin Astronautics razed the old towers that supported their last Titan launch in April 1999 to make way for construction of this new Atlas V launch facility. The launch pad abuts the Atlantic Ocean on the east, seen here in the background KSC-00pp0430

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Workers off-load NASA's Genesis spacecraft which arrived at the Shuttle Landing Facility at 3:30 a.m. aboard an Air Force C-17 aircraft.; Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo.; The spacecraft will undergo final launch preparations in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility in KSC's industrial area. Genesis will capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system's origin. Launch aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT.; NASA's Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif KSC-01pp1049

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Workers off-load NASA's Genesis spacecraft which arrived at the Shuttle Landing Facility at 3:30 a.m. aboard an Air Force C-17 aircraft.; Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo.; The spacecraft will undergo final launch preparations in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility in KSC's industrial area. Genesis will capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system's origin. Launch aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT.; NASA's Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif KSC-01pp1049

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility, workers prepare NASA's Genesis spacecraft for transport to the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility in KSC's industrial area where it will undergo final preparations;for launch.; The spacecraft arrived aboard an Air Force C-17 aircraft from Denver, Colo., where it was built for NASA by Lockheed Martin Astronautics.; Genesis is designed to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system's origin. Launch aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT.; NASA's Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif KSC-01pp1050

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At the Shuttle Landing Facility, workers prepare NASA's Genesis spacecraft for transport to the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility in KSC's industrial area where it will undergo final preparations;for launch.; The spacecraft arrived aboard an Air Force C-17 aircraft from Denver, Colo., where it was built for NASA by Lockheed Martin Astronautics.; Genesis is designed to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system's origin. Launch aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT.; NASA's Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif KSC-01pp1050

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- An S-band medium gain antenna is installed on NASA's Genesis spacecraft in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility in KSC's industrial area. The spacecraft is undergoing final preparations for its launch aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket on July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT. Genesis will capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system's origin. NASA's Genesis project is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo KSC-01pp1082

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- An S-band medium gain antenna is installed on NASA's Genesis spacecraft in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility in KSC's industrial area.  The spacecraft is undergoing final preparations for its launch aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket on July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT.   Genesis will capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system's origin. NASA's Genesis project is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.  Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo KSC-01pp1082

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- An S-band medium gain antenna is installed on NASA's Genesis spacecraft in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility in KSC's industrial area. The spacecraft is undergoing final preparations for its launch aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket on July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT. Genesis will capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system's origin. NASA's Genesis project is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo KSC-01pp1081

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- An S-band medium gain antenna is installed on NASA's Genesis spacecraft in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility in KSC's industrial area.  The spacecraft is undergoing final preparations for its launch aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket on July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT.   Genesis will capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system's origin. NASA's Genesis project is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.  Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo KSC-01pp1081

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- On Launch Complex 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, technicians work on the bottom of the first stage of a Delta II rocket before its lift up the gantry. The rocket will propel the Genesis spacecraft on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA's Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC01pd1093

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- On Launch Complex 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, technicians work on the bottom of the first stage of a Delta II rocket before its lift up the gantry. The rocket will propel the Genesis spacecraft on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA's Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC01pd1093

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- A Boeing Delta II rocket is raised from its transporter in order to be lifted into the gantry. The rocket will propel the Genesis spacecraft on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system's origin. NASA’s Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC-01pp1090

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- A Boeing Delta II rocket is raised from its transporter in order to be lifted into the gantry. The rocket will propel the Genesis spacecraft on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system's origin. NASA’s Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC-01pp1090

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The first stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket arrives on Launch Complex 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The rocket will propel the Genesis spacecraft on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA's Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC01pd1089

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The first stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket arrives on Launch Complex 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. The rocket will propel the Genesis spacecraft on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA's Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC01pd1089

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- On Launch Complex 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, a Boeing Delta II rocket is lifted off the transporter and into the gantry. The rocket will propel the Genesis spacecraft on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system's origin. NASA’s Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC-01pp1092

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- On Launch Complex 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, a Boeing Delta II rocket is lifted off the transporter and into the gantry. The rocket will propel the Genesis spacecraft on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system's origin. NASA’s Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC-01pp1092

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- On Launch Complex 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, technicians work on the bottom of the first stage of a Delta II rocket before its lift up the gantry. The rocket will propel the Genesis spacecraft on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA's Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC01pd1094

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- On Launch Complex 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, technicians work on the bottom of the first stage of a Delta II rocket before its lift up the gantry. The rocket will propel the Genesis spacecraft on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA's Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC01pd1094

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- On Launch Complex 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the first stage of a Delta II rocket is lifted up the gantry. The rocket will propel the Genesis spacecraft on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA's Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC01pd1095

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- On Launch Complex 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the first stage of a Delta II rocket is lifted up the gantry. The rocket will propel the Genesis spacecraft on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA's Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC01pd1095

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- On Launch Complex 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, workers prepare to disconnect the first stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket from the transporter. The rocket will propel the Genesis spacecraft on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system's origin. NASA’s Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC-01pp1091

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- On Launch Complex 17A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, workers prepare to disconnect the first stage of a Boeing Delta II rocket from the transporter. The rocket will propel the Genesis spacecraft on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system's origin. NASA’s Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC-01pp1091

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- A third solid rocket booster is raised to join the other two on Launch Complex 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. They will be mated to the Delta II rocket for the Genesis spacecraft launch. Genesis will capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA’s Genesis project is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. Launch of Genesis aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC01pd1108

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- A third solid rocket booster is raised to join the other two on Launch Complex 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. They will be mated to the Delta II rocket for the Genesis spacecraft launch. Genesis will capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA’s Genesis project is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. Launch of Genesis aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC01pd1108

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- A worker in the Space Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 faces the Genesis spacecraft at right as he provides information about it to the media gathered at left. Genesis will capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system's origin. NASA's Genesis project is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. Launch of Genesis aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC01pd1104

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- A worker in the Space Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2 faces the Genesis spacecraft at right as he provides information about it to the media gathered at left. Genesis will capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system's origin. NASA's Genesis project is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. Launch of Genesis aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC01pd1104

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Genesis project crew stands in front of the spacecraft for a media showing in the Space Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2. Genesis will capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system's origin. NASA's Genesis project is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. Launch of Genesis aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC01pd1101

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The Genesis project crew stands in front of the spacecraft for a media showing in the Space Assembly and Encapsulation Facility -2. Genesis will capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system's origin. NASA's Genesis project is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. Launch of Genesis aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC01pd1101

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Workers on Launch Complex 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, oversee the lifting of a solid rocket booster to be mated with the Delta II rocket for the Genesis spacecraft launch. Genesis will capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA’s Genesis project is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. Launch of Genesis aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC01pd1106

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Workers on Launch Complex 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, oversee the lifting of a solid rocket booster to be mated with the Delta II rocket for the Genesis spacecraft launch. Genesis will capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA’s Genesis project is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. Launch of Genesis aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC01pd1106

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- -- Technicians work on the bottom of the solid rocket boosters and Delta II rocket that will launch the Genesis spacecraft. Genesis will capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA’s Genesis project is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. Launch of Genesis aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC01pd1112

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- -- Technicians work on the bottom of the solid rocket boosters and Delta II rocket that will launch the Genesis spacecraft. Genesis will capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA’s Genesis project is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. Launch of Genesis aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC01pd1112

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Technicians on Launch Complex 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, check the fittings on the solid rocket boosters surrounding the Delta II rocket that will launch the Genesis spacecraft. Genesis will capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA’s Genesis project is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. Launch of Genesis aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC01pd1111

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Technicians on Launch Complex 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, check the fittings on the solid rocket boosters surrounding the Delta II rocket that will launch the Genesis spacecraft. Genesis will capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA’s Genesis project is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. Launch of Genesis aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC01pd1111

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The third solid rocket booster joins the other two on Launch Complex 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. They will be mated to the Delta II rocket for the Genesis spacecraft launch. Genesis will capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA’s Genesis project is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. Launch of Genesis aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC01pd1109

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The third solid rocket booster joins the other two on Launch Complex 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. They will be mated to the Delta II rocket for the Genesis spacecraft launch. Genesis will capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA’s Genesis project is managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. Launch of Genesis aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC01pd1109

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- After being raised to a vertical position, the second stage of a Delta II rocket is ready to be lifted up the gantry on Launch Complex 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, where it will be mated with the first stage. The Delta II will propel the Genesis spacecraft on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA’s Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC01pd1129

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- After being raised to a vertical position, the second stage of a Delta II rocket is ready to be lifted up the gantry on Launch Complex 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, where it will be mated with the first stage. The Delta II will propel the Genesis spacecraft on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA’s Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC01pd1129

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The second stage of a Delta II rocket arrives at Launch Complex 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, to be mated with the first stage. The Delta II will propel the Genesis spacecraft on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA’s Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC-01pp1127

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The second stage of a Delta II rocket arrives at Launch Complex 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, to be mated with the first stage. The Delta II will propel the Genesis spacecraft on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA’s Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC-01pp1127

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Workers at Launch Complex 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, oversee the lifting of the second stage of a Delta II rocket, which is to be mated with the first stage. The Delta II will propel the Genesis spacecraft on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA’s Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC-01pp1128

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- Workers at Launch Complex 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, oversee the lifting of the second stage of a Delta II rocket, which is to be mated with the first stage. The Delta II will propel the Genesis spacecraft on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA’s Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC-01pp1128

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The second stage of a Delta II rocket is moved into position on the gantry on Launch Complex 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, for mating with the first stage. The Delta II will propel the Genesis spacecraft on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA’s Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC01pd1132

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The second stage of a Delta II rocket is moved into position on the gantry on Launch Complex 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, for mating with the first stage. The Delta II will propel the Genesis spacecraft on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA’s Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC01pd1132

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The second stage of a Delta II rocket rises up the gantry on Launch Complex 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, where it will be mated with the first stage. The Delta II will propel the Genesis spacecraft on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA’s Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC-01pp1130

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- The second stage of a Delta II rocket rises up the gantry on Launch Complex 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, where it will be mated with the first stage. The Delta II will propel the Genesis spacecraft on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA’s Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC-01pp1130

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At Launch Complex 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the second part of the fairing for the Genesis spacecraft is lifted up the gantry. The fairing will encapsulate the spacecraft to protect it during launch aboard a Delta II rocket. Genesis will be on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA’s Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC01pd1180

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At Launch Complex 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the second part of the fairing for the Genesis spacecraft is lifted up the gantry. The fairing will encapsulate the spacecraft to protect it during launch aboard a Delta II rocket. Genesis will be on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA’s Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC01pd1180

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At Launch Complex 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, one part of the fairing for the Genesis spacecraft arrives at the top of the gantry. The fairing will encapsulate the spacecraft to protect it during launch aboard a Delta II rocket. Genesis will be on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA’s Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC-01pp1178

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At Launch Complex 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, one part of the fairing for the Genesis spacecraft arrives at the top of the gantry. The fairing will encapsulate the spacecraft to protect it during launch aboard a Delta II rocket. Genesis will be on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA’s Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC-01pp1178

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At Launch Complex 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the second part of the fairing for the Genesis spacecraft arrives at the top of the gantry. The fairing will encapsulate the spacecraft to protect it during launch aboard a Delta II rocket. Genesis will be on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA’s Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC01pd1181

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At Launch Complex 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the second part of the fairing for the Genesis spacecraft arrives at the top of the gantry. The fairing will encapsulate the spacecraft to protect it during launch aboard a Delta II rocket. Genesis will be on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA’s Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC01pd1181

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At Launch Complex 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, one part of the fairing for the Genesis spacecraft is being moved toward the opening in the foreground where the Genesis spacecraft waits for encapsulation. The fairing will protect the spacecraft during launch aboard a Delta II rocket. Genesis will be on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA’s Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC-01pp1179

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At Launch Complex 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, one part of the fairing for the Genesis spacecraft is being moved toward the opening in the foreground where the Genesis spacecraft waits for encapsulation. The fairing will protect the spacecraft during launch aboard a Delta II rocket. Genesis will be on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA’s Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC-01pp1179

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At Launch Complex 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, part of the fairing for the Genesis spacecraft is lifted up the gantry. The fairing will encapsulate the spacecraft to protect it during launch aboard a Delta II rocket. Genesis will be on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA’s Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC-01pp1177

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- At Launch Complex 17-A, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, part of the fairing for the Genesis spacecraft is lifted up the gantry. The fairing will encapsulate the spacecraft to protect it during launch aboard a Delta II rocket. Genesis will be on a journey to capture samples of the ions and elements in the solar wind and return them to Earth for scientists to use to determine the exact composition of the Sun and the solar system’s origin. NASA’s Genesis project in managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Lockheed Martin Astronautics built the Genesis spacecraft for NASA in Denver, Colo. The launch is scheduled for July 30 at 12:36 p.m. EDT KSC-01pp1177

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Adrian Laffitte (second from left) and his family enjoy a moment in the spotlight at a formal dinner held in the Debus Conference Center at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. Laffitte, director of Atlas Programs for Lockheed Martin Astronautics at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, was honored as the winner of the 2003 Dr. Kurt H. Debus Award from the National Space Club Florida Committee. The Debus Award was created by the committee to recognize significant achievements and contributions made in Florida to American aerospace efforts. KSC-03pd1141

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Adrian Laffitte (second from left) and his family enjoy a moment in the spotlight at a formal dinner held in the Debus Conference Center at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex.  Laffitte, director of Atlas Programs for Lockheed Martin Astronautics at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, was honored as the winner of the 2003 Dr. Kurt H. Debus Award from the National Space Club Florida Committee.  The Debus Award was created by the committee to recognize significant achievements and contributions made in Florida to American aerospace efforts. KSC-03pd1141

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Deputy Administrator and former astronaut Frederick Gregory is the featured speaker at a formal dinner held in the Debus Conference Center at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. Adrian Laffitte, director of Atlas Programs for Lockheed Martin Astronautics at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, was honored as the winner of the 2003 Dr. Kurt H. Debus Award from the National Space Club Florida Committee at the dinner. The Debus Award was created by the committee to recognize significant achievements and contributions made in Florida to American aerospace efforts. KSC-03pd1143

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- NASA Deputy Administrator and former astronaut Frederick Gregory is the featured speaker at a formal dinner held in the Debus Conference Center at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex.  Adrian Laffitte, director of Atlas Programs for Lockheed Martin Astronautics at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, was honored as the winner of the 2003 Dr. Kurt H. Debus Award from the National Space Club Florida Committee at the dinner.  The Debus Award was created by the committee to recognize significant achievements and contributions made in Florida to American aerospace efforts. KSC-03pd1143