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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, astronaut Garrett Reisman takes a close look at hardware for an upcoming shuttle flight. With construction of the Space Station the primary focus of future shuttle missions, astronaut crews will be working with one or more of the elements and hardware already being processed in the SSPF. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0299

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Space Station Processing Facility, astronaut Garrett Reisman (right) gets hands-on experience with a piece of hardware to be flown on an upcoming shuttle flight. Next to him is a technician. With construction of the Space Station the primary focus of future shuttle missions, astronaut crews will be working with one or more of the elements and hardware already being processed in the SSPF. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd0301

ISS016-S-002F (June 2007) --- This crew portrait shows the variety of crewmembers who will occupy the International Space Station during Expedition 16. Astronaut Peggy Whitson (front row, right), station commander; and Russia's Federal Space Agency cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko (front row, left), flight engineer and Soyuz commander, will join NASA astronaut Clay Anderson (back row, left), flight engineer, in October after launching from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on the Soyuz TMA-11 spacecraft. Anderson will be replaced in October by astronaut Dan Tani (back row, second from left), flight engineer, who will yield his place in December to Leopold Eyharts of the European Space Agency (back row, third from left). Eyharts will be replaced in February 2008 by astronaut Garrett Reisman (back row, far right), flight engineer. iss016-s-002f

ISS016-S-002E (June 2007) --- This crew portrait shows astronaut Peggy Whitson, Expedition 16 commander, with Russia's Federal Space Agency cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko (left), flight engineer and Soyuz commander; and astronaut Garrett Reisman, flight engineer. Reisman will arrive on the station in February 2008 to replace Leopold Eyharts of the European Space Agency, who arrives in December. Whitson and Malenchenko, two veterans of previous International Space Station flights, are scheduled to launch to the complex in the Soyuz TMA-11 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan in October for a six-month mission. iss016-s-002e

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the Orbiter Processing Facility, STS-123 crew members inspect the wheel well on the underside of space shuttle Endeavour. From left front are astronaut Garrett Reisman, Mission Specialists Takao Doi, Michael Foreman and Richard Linnehan, Commander Dominic Gorie, Pilot Gregory Johnson and Mission Specialist Robert Behnken. They are at NASA's Kennedy Space Center for a crew equipment interface test, a process of familiarization with payloads, hardware and the space shuttle. The STS-123 mission is targeted for launch on space shuttle Endeavour on Feb. 14. It will be the 25th assembly flight of the station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-07pd3553

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Crew members for space shuttle Discovery's STS-124 mission don their launch and entry suits before heading to Launch Pad 39A. Mission Specialist Gregory Chamitoff puts on his helmet to check communications. Chamitoff will join the Expedition 17 crew on the International Space Station as a flight engineer, taking the place of astronaut Garrett Reisman, who will return to Earth on Discovery. The STS-124 mission is the second of three flights launching components to complete the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory. The shuttle crew will install Kibo's large Japanese Pressurized Module and its remote manipulator system, or RMS. The 14-day flight includes three spacewalks. Launch is scheduled for 5:02 p.m. May 31. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1512

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Crew members for space shuttle Discovery's STS-124 mission stride out of the Operations and Checkout Building eager to get to the Astrovan that will take them to Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Leading the way are Pilot Ken Ham (left) and Commander Mark Kelly (right). Behind Ham are (front to back) Mission Specialists Ron Garan, Akihiko Hoshide and Gregory Chamitoff. Behind Kelly are (front to back) Mission Specialists Karen Nyberg and Mike Fossum. Hoshide represents the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. Chamitoff will join the Expedition 17 crew on the International Space Station as a flight engineer, taking the place of astronaut Garrett Reisman, who will return to Earth on Discovery. The STS-124 mission is the second of three flights launching components to complete the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory. The shuttle crew will install Kibo's large Japanese Pressurized Module and its remote manipulator system, or RMS. The 14-day flight includes three spacewalks. Launch is scheduled for 5:02 p.m. May 31. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1521

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Crew members for space shuttle Discovery's STS-124 mission pose for the traditional photo celebrating the upcoming launch. From left are Mission Specialists Gregory Chamitoff and Ron Garan, Pilot Ken Ham, Commander Mark Kelly, and Mission Specialists Karen Nyberg, Akihiko Hoshide and Mike Fossum. Chamitoff will join the Expedition 17 crew on the International Space Station as a flight engineer, taking the place of astronaut Garrett Reisman, who will return to Earth on Discovery. Hoshide represents the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. The STS-124 mission is the second of three flights launching components to complete the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory. The shuttle crew will install Kibo's large Japanese Pressurized Module and its remote manipulator system, or RMS. The 14-day flight includes three spacewalks. Launch is scheduled for 5:02 p.m. May 31. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1506

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Crew members for space shuttle Discovery's STS-124 mission don their launch and entry suits before heading to Launch Pad 39A. Mission Specialist Gregory Chamitoff is ready for his helmet. Chamitoff will join the Expedition 17 crew on the International Space Station as a flight engineer, taking the place of astronaut Garrett Reisman, who will return to Earth on Discovery. Chamitoff is making his first shuttle flight. The STS-124 mission is the second of three flights launching components to complete the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory. The shuttle crew will install Kibo's large Japanese Pressurized Module and its remote manipulator system, or RMS. The 14-day flight includes three spacewalks. Launch is scheduled for 5:02 p.m. May 31. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1508

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Crew members for space shuttle Discovery's STS-124 mission pause by the Astrovan to wave to spectators before their ride to Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. From left are Mission Specialists Gregory Chamitoff, Akihiko Hoshide, Mike Fossum, Ron Garan and Karen Nyberg, Pilot Ken Ham and Commander Mark Kelly. Hoshide represents the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. Chamitoff will join the Expedition 17 crew on the International Space Station as a flight engineer, taking the place of astronaut Garrett Reisman, who will return to Earth on Discovery. The STS-124 mission is the second of three flights launching components to complete the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory. The shuttle crew will install Kibo's large Japanese Pressurized Module and its remote manipulator system, or RMS. The 14-day flight includes three spacewalks. Launch is scheduled for 5:02 p.m. May 31. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1522

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – After landing with the STS-124 mission crew, astronaut Garrett Reisman joins in the traditional walk-around under the shuttle after landing. Reisman spent 95 days on the International Space Station as part of the Expedition 17 crew. The STS-124 mission ended with space shuttle Discovery's landing on Runway 15 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, ending a 14-day mission to the International Space Station. Discovery's main landing gear touched down at 11:15:19 a.m. EDT on Runway 15. The nose landing gear touched down at 11:15:30 a.m. and wheel stop was at 11:16:19 a.m. The mission completed 5.7 million miles. The STS-124 mission delivered the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's large Japanese Pressurized Module and its remote manipulator system to the space station. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1725

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Following the successful landing of space shuttle Discovery at NASA's Kennedy Space Center to end the 14-day, STS-124 mission, the crew sits for a press conference. Astronaut Garrett Reisman, who returned to Earth on Discovery after a 95-day stay on the International Space Station, talks about his delight at the Florida sunshine. The STS-124 mission delivered the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's large Japanese Pressurized Module and its remote manipulator system to the International Space Station. The landing was on time at 11:15 a.m. EDT. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd1745