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Instructions for the inlisting of Men. [Followed by a blank commission, dated June. 1775, to raise a company of seventy-two men, with the assurance of an appoitment as officer therein.]

The deed of settlement of the Mutual Assurance Company, for insuring houses from loss by fire in New York.

Louis III et Carloman donnent aux eveques du Royaume l'assurance de leur Fidelite en 882

people from "Mr. Plausible Prate: or, the Adventures of an Assurance Agent. By Ned of Chester"

Design for Trade Card [The Sun Life Assurance Society]

Assurance

DINNER [held by] GENERAL LIFE AND FIRE ASSURANCE COMPANY [at] "THE GRAND HOTEL, TRAFALGAR SQUARE, LONDON, [ENGLAND]" (FOREIGN HOTEL)

DINNER [held by] GENERAL LIFE AND FIRE ASSURANCE COMPANY [at] "THE GRAND HOTEL, TRAFALGAR SQUARE, LONDON, [ENGLAND]" (FOREIGN HOTEL)

DINNER [held by] GENERAL LIFE AND FIRE ASSURANCE COMPANY [at] "THE GRAND HOTEL, TRAFALGAR SQUARE, LONDON, [ENGLAND]" (FOREIGN HOTEL)

DINNER [held by] GENERAL LIFE AND FIRE ASSURANCE COMPANY [at] "THE GRAND HOTEL, TRAFALGAR SQUARE, LONDON, [ENGLAND]" (FOREIGN HOTEL)

Equitable Life Assurance offices, New York

Grand arcade, Equitable Life Assurance Building, New York

DINNER TO THE METROPOLITAN GENERAL AGENTS [held by] EQUITABLE LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY [at] "DELMONICO'S, NEW YORK, NY" (REST;)

DINNER TO THE METROPOLITAN GENERAL AGENTS [held by] EQUITABLE LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY [at] "DELMONICO'S, NEW YORK, NY" (REST;)

DINNER TO THE METROPOLITAN GENERAL AGENTS [held by] EQUITABLE LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY [at] "DELMONICO'S, NEW YORK, NY" (REST;)

DINNER ON TOUR VIA SOUTHERN RAILWAY [held by] EQUITABLE LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY [at] "EN ROUTE, PITTSBURGH TO ORMOND" (RR;)

DINNER ON ON TOUR VIA SOUTHERN RAILWAY [held by] EQUITABLE LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY [at] "EN ROUTE, PITTSBURGH TO ORMOND" (RR;)

LUNCHEON ON TOUR VIA SOUTHERN RAILWAY [held by] EQUITABLE LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY [at] "EN ROUTE, PITTSBURGH TO ORMOND" (RR;)

DINNER AT THE CONVENTION [held by] EQUITABLE LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY OF THE US [at] "ORIENTAL HOTEL,MANHATTAN BEACH, NY" (HOTEL;)

DINNER ON ON TOUR VIA SOUTHERN RAILWAY [held by] EQUITABLE LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY [at] "EN ROUTE, PITTSBURGH TO ORMOND" (RR;)

DINNER AT THE CONVENTION [held by] EQUITABLE LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY OF THE US [at] "ORIENTAL HOTEL,MANHATTAN BEACH, NY" (HOTEL;)

DINNER ON TOUR VIA SOUTHERN RAILWAY [held by] EQUITABLE LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY [at] "EN ROUTE, PITTSBURGH TO ORMOND" (RR;)

LUNCHEON ON TOUR VIA SOUTHERN RAILWAY [held by] EQUITABLE LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY [at] "EN ROUTE, PITTSBURGH TO ORMOND" (RR;)

DINNER AT THE CONVENTION [held by] EQUITABLE LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY OF THE US [at] "ORIENTAL HOTEL,MANHATTAN BEACH, NY" (HOTEL;)

DINNER ON TOUR VIA SOUTHERN RAILWAY [held by] EQUITABLE LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY [at] "EN ROUTE, PITTSBURGH TO ORMOND" (RR;)

DINNER ON ON TOUR VIA SOUTHERN RAILWAY [held by] EQUITABLE LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY [at] "EN ROUTE, PITTSBURGH TO ORMOND" (RR;)

LUNCHEON ON TOUR VIA SOUTHERN RAILWAY [held by] EQUITABLE LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY [at] "EN ROUTE, PITTSBURGH TO ORMOND" (RR;)

The "Sunny South" applauds President Roosevelt assurance of a Panama Canal, Jacksonville, Fla.

Santa Claus receives aeroplane pilot's license from Assistant Secretary of Commerce. Although there may not be sufficient snow for his reindeer sleigh, Santa Claus will still be able to deliver his load of presents on time this Christmas by using the air route. The old saint called at the Commerce Department in Washington today where he is shown receiving an aeroplane pilot's license from Assistant Secretary of Commerce. for Aeronautics William P. MacCracken, while Clarence M. Young (right) Director of Aeronautics, Department of Commerce, looks on. Airway maps and the assurance that the lights would be burning on the airways Christmas Eve were also given to Santa

Before Monopoly Committee. Washington, D.C., Feb. 16. Charles D. Hilles, Director of the New York Life Insurance Company, and also Resident Agent for the Employer Liability Assurance Corp., today explained to the Monopoly Committee investigating insurance setups the relations between the two companies. When questioned Hilles admitted that business had increased materially for the Assurance Corp., since he became a member of the New York Life board. He told the committee that nearly 5000 pieces of New York Life property are covered by the assurance company, 2-16-39

Production. Pratt and Whitney airplane engines. A completed Pratt and Whitney airplane motor ready for installation in a plane is prepared for shipment from a large Eastern plant. The care that is taken producing this fine engine extends even to the work of packing it properly, with every assurance that it will not be damaged in transit. Pratt and Whitney Aircraft

Chicago, Illinois. Subsistence research laboratory of the U.S. Army quartermaster depot. Five-in-one ration. This ration so designed so that five servicemen starting on a mission can throw the ration in the back of a jeep and proceed with assurance that they will have three square meals. Besides the canned food showing, there are numerous other items in the large container, such as coffee, instant rice, tea, lemon juice powder, hard candy, grape juice powder, cocoa with sugar and biscuit squares

RELIABILITY AND QUALITY ASSURANCE DIRECTORATE

PRODUCTS ASSURANCE BRANCH STORY FOR LEWIS NEWS - B CLYMER BRANCH CHIEF

R&QA RELIABILITY AND QUALITY ASSURANCE SUPERVISORS AND SECRETARIES FOR SUPERVISORS MEETING

PRODUCTS ASSURANCE BRANCH STORY FOR LEWIS NEWS - B CLYMER BRANCH CHIEF

PRODUCTS ASSURANCE BRANCH STORY FOR LEWIS NEWS - B CLYMER BRANCH CHIEF

R&QA RELIANCE & QUALITY ASSURANCE FOR LEWIS NEWS CENTERFOLD STORY

R&QA RELIABILITY AND QUALITY ASSURANCE SUPERVISORS AND SECRETARIES FOR SUPERVISORS MEETING

R&QA RELIANCE & QUALITY ASSURANCE FOR LEWIS NEWS CENTERFOLD STORY

PRODUCTS ASSURANCE BRANCH STORY FOR LEWIS NEWS - B CLYMER BRANCH CHIEF

PRODUCTS ASSURANCE BRANCH STORY FOR LEWIS NEWS - B CLYMER BRANCH CHIEF

DATA SYSTEMS IN OR&QA OFFICE OF RELIABILITY AND QUALITY ASSURANCE

DATA SYSTEMS IN OR&QA OFFICE OF RELIABILITY AND QUALITY ASSURANCE

DATA SYSTEMS IN OR&QA OFFICE OF RELIABILITY AND QUALITY ASSURANCE

DATA SYSTEMS IN OR&QA OFFICE OF RELIABILITY AND QUALITY ASSURANCE

R&QAO RELIABILITY AND QUALITY ASSURANCE OFFICE PERSONNEL

R&QAO RELIABILITY AND QUALITY ASSURANCE OFFICE PERSONNEL

James Lott, left, from the Air Force Plant Representative Office Quality Assurance Section, reviews records on the automatic soldering system with Larry Owens, a manufacturing supervisor at the Westinghouse Defense and Electronic Systems Center. Westinghouse is manufacturing digital signal processing units for F-16 aircraft radar systems

James Lott, left, from the Air Force Plant Representative Office Quality Assurance Section, talks with Al Miller, an employee at the Westinghouse Defense and Electronic Systems Center. Westinghouse is manufacturing digital signal processing units for F-16 aircraft radar systems

CAPT. Victoria Dunovant, a quality assurance officer at the Occupational and Environmental Lab, checks the printout from a gas chromatograph

Aviation Ordnanceman 3rd Class (AO3) Darryl Jackson, right, does a quality assurance check in the bomb assembly room aboard the aircraft carrier USS JOHN F. KENNEDY (CV-67)

View of the building housing the new Diagnostic and Quality Assurance Facility for the 4th Transportation Squadron

John A. Lockerd, Assistant Deputy CHIEF of STAFF for Product Assurance and Testing

A US Air Force quality assurance evaluator inpsects electrical equipment in the subarray face of the Cobra Dane radar system operated by the 16th Surveillance Squadron

Quality assurance inspector Al Burke checks an M1A1 Abrams tank cradle on a Cordax measuring machine at the Rock Island Arsenal

A view of part of the U.S. Navy Bishop Point facility showing the salvage ship USS SALVOR (ARS-52) and the ocean surveillance ship USNS ASSURANCE (T-AGOS-5) tied up at the piers

Captain (CPT) Cynthia Murray, Registered Nurse (RN), a quality assurance coordinator at the US Air Force Regional Hospital

Technical Sergeant (TSGT) John W. Varner, quality assurance inspector, 1ST Special Operations Wing, replaces a broken cockpit window on a C-130E Hercules aircraft. The damage occurred when the plane encountered a hailstorm while on a routine mission from

Technical Sergeant (TSGT) John W. Varner, quality assurance inspector, 1ST Special Operations Wing, replaces a broken cockpit window on a C-130E Hercules aircraft. The damage occurred when the plane encountered a hailstorm while on a routine mission from

Technical Sergeant (TSGT) John W. Varner, quality assurance inspector, 1ST Special Operations Wing, and STAFF Sergeant (SSGT) Albert M. Mikolajczyk, 834th Aircraft Generation Squadron, inspect the engines of a C-130E Hercules aircraft before approving it

A Hewlett-Packard 3586C Selective Level Meter at the US Navy Metrology/Calibration Laboratory passes a quality assurance check

Aviation Electronics Technician 3rd Class Vincent Meyer checks a computer memory file during a quality assurance inspection at the US Navy Metrology/Calibration Laboratory

Mineman First Class (MN1) Vincent Price, a member of the Mobile Mine Assembly Group Unit 5 quality assurance team, talks with SENIOR CHIEF Mineman (MNCS) Larry Moir, the command senior chief petty officer

Mineman 2nd Class Marian Noonan, Mineman 1ST Class Vincent Price and Mineman 3rd Class Nina Jacobson, all members of the Mobile Mine Assembly Group Unit 5 quality assurance team, complete administrative work in their office

Portrait of DoD (U.S. Coast Guard Rear Adm. ret.) Mr. Edward F. Blasser M.D.Deputy Assistant Secrerary of Defense, Professional Affairs and Quality Assurance(Uncovered)U.S. Army PHOTO by Mr. Russell F. Roederer, CIV

Portrait of DoD Dr. Edward F. Blasser, Deputy Assistant Secrerary of Defense, Professional Affairs and Quality Assurance. (U.S. Army photo by Mr. Russell F. Roederer) (Released) (PC-191457)

Ed Hakim, CHIEF of the Reliability Testing and Quality Assurance Branch at the Electronics Technology Laboratory (Myer Center), studies microelectronic circuits using an electron microscope

Mike Griffith, a civilian quality assurance ammunition specialist, makes a notation while supervising the testing of containers of chemical munitions during Operation Steel Box. The container, which were transported to Johnston Atoll aboard Military Sealift Command ships, are being checked for leaks before the munitions are taken to the U.S. Army Chemical Activity on the atoll for storage and disposal

Crew members paint the anchor of the ocean surveillance ship USNS ASSURANCE (T-AGOS-5) as another ocean surveillance ship, the USNS TRIUMPH (T-AGOS-4), is moored alongside

The ground breaking ceremony takes place at the site for a new medical clinic. Taking part in the event are, from left: COL John W. Handy; MGEN Alexander M. Sloan, command surgeon, Headquarters, U.S. European Command; Gerhard Hubsch; BGEN Paul D. Gleason, director, professional affairs and quality assurance, Air Force Office of Medical Support and COL R.J. Jones

MGEN Alexander M. Sloan, command surgeon, Headquarters, U.S. European Command, addresses the crowd gathered at the ground breaking ceremony for a new medical clinic. BGEN Paul D. Gleason, director, professional affairs and quality assurance, Air Force Office of Medical Support, is seated in the background

Silhouetted against the sun, SGT. D. Ente performs a routine quality assurance check on the tailplane of a KC-135 Stratotanker aircraft from the 351st Air Refueling squadron, 100th Air Refueling Wing

COL. Burton C. Quist, commander Joint Task Force Provide Promise (Forward), US Marine Corps, presents a gym bag to Sue Stockdale, Quality Assurance Officer, Headquarters United Nations Protective Forces for her performance in the Independence Day 5K Fun Run at Camp Pleso

A member of a United States quality assurance team which accompanied the M-113A2s to Uganda checks a vehicle before turning it over to the United Nations personnel at Entebbe Airport

A medium shot front view of a US Air Force C-17 Globe MASTER III aircraft from the Air Mobility Command, 14th Airlift Squadron, Charleston AFB, South Carolina being marshaled in at Entebbe International Airport, Uganda, Africa. The aircraft and its crew brought supplies and equipment in support of Operation GURAIDANCE ASSURANCE and is the first C-17 to land at the airport

Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) worker Mary Reaves mates connectors on a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) to power up the Cassini spacecraft, while quality assurance engineer Peter Sorci looks on. The three RTGs which will be used on Cassini are undergoing mechanical and electrical verification testing in the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility. The RTGs will provide electrical power to Cassini on its 6.7-year trip to the Saturnian system and during its four-year mission at Saturn. RTGs use heat from the natural decay of plutonium to generate electric power. The generators enable spacecraft to operate at great distances from the Sun where solar power systems are not feasible. The Cassini mission is targeted for an Oct. 6 launch aboard a Titan IVB/Centaur expendable launch vehicle. Cassini is built and managed by JPL KSC-97PC1092

STS-86 Mission Specialists Wendy B. Lawrence, at center facing camera, and Jean-Loup J.M. Chretien of the French Space Agency, CNES, prepare to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A, with the assistance of white room closeout crew member Jim Davis, a NASA quality assurance specialist KSC-97PC1439

STS-86 Mission Specialist David A. Wolf, at center facing camera, prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A, with the assistance of Rick Welty, in foreground at center, United Space Alliance (USA) orbiter vehicle closeout chief; and closeout team members, in background from left, Jim Davis, NASA quality assurance specialist; and George Schramm, USA mechanical technician. STS-86 Mission Specialist Vladimir Georgievich Titov, in foreground at far left, is awaiting his turn KSC-97PC1436

STS-86 Commander James D. Wetherbee prepares to enter the Space Shuttle Atlantis at Launch Pad 39A, with the assistance of white room closeout crew member Jim Davis, a NASA quality assurance specialist. Rick Welty, United Space Alliance orbiter vehicle closeout chief, is in foreground with back to camera KSC-97PC1441

STS-87 Mission Specialist Kalpana Chawla, Ph.D., is assisted with her ascent and re-entry flight suit in the white room at Launch Pad 39B by Danny Wyatt, NASA quality assurance specialist. Kneeing before Dr. Chawla to assist her is George Schram, USA mechanical technician, as Dr. Chawla prepares to enter the Space Shuttle orbiter Columbia on launch day. STS-87 is the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and Spartan-201 KSC-97PC1702

STS-87 Payload Specialist Leonid Kadenyuk of the National Space Agency of Ukraine is assisted with final preparations before launch in the white room at Launch Pad 39B by Danny Wyatt, NASA quality assurance specialist, at left; George Schram, USA mechanical technician, facing Kadenyuk; and Travis Thompson, USA orbiter vehicle closeout chief, at right. STS-87 is the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and Spartan-201. The 16-day mission will include the Collaborative Ukrainian Experiment (CUE), a collection of 10 plant space biology experiments that will fly in Columbia’s middeck and will feature an educational component that involves evaluating the effects of microgravity on Brassica rapa seedlings KSC-97PC1704

STS-87 Mission Specialist Winston Scott is assisted with his ascent and re-entry flight suit in the white room at Launch Pad 39B by Danny Wyatt, NASA quality assurance specialist. STS-87 is the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and Spartan-201. Scott is scheduled to perform an extravehicular activity spacewalk with Mission Specialist Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan, during STS-87. Scott also performed a spacewalk on the STS-72 mission KSC-97PC1707

STS-87 Mission Specialist Takao Doi, Ph.D., of the National Space Development Agency of Japan, is assisted with his ascent and re-entry flight suit by Dave Law, USA mechanical technician, in the white room at Launch Pad 39B as Dr. Doi prepares to enter the Space Shuttle orbiter Columbia on launch day. At right wearing glasses is Danny Wyatt, NASA quality assurance specialist. STS-87 is the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and Spartan-201. The 16-day mission will include a spacewalk by Dr. Doi and Mission Specialist Winston Scott KSC-97PC1703

STS-87 Commander Kevin Kregel is assisted with his ascent and re-entry flight suit in the white room at Launch Pad 39B by Danny Wyatt, NASA quality assurance specialist. STS-87 is the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload and Spartan-201. A veteran of two space flights (STS-70 and -78), Kregel has logged more than 618 hours in space KSC-97PC1705

In the white room prior to launch, STS-96 Commander Kent V. Rominger reaches to shake hands with Suit Technician Jean Alexander. The white room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm that provides entry to the orbiter crew compartment. At right are closeout crew members Chief Travis Thompson and Quality Assurance Specialist James Davis; at left is Mechanical Technician Chris Meinert. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying about 4,000 pounds of supplies, to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-involved experiment. It will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Space Shuttle Discovery is due to launch today at 6:49 a.m. EDT. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 1:58 a.m. EDT KSC-99pp0600

Before entering the orbiter Discovery, STS-96 Mission Specialist Valery Ivanovich Tokarev (center) is checked out by white room closeout crew members Mechanical Technician Chris Meinert and Quality Assurance Specialist Jim Davis on the left, and Closeout Chief Travis Thompson and Suit Technician Jean Alexander on the right. The white room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm that provides entry to the orbiter crew compartment. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying about 4,000 pounds of supplies, to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-involved experiment. It will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Space Shuttle Discovery is due to launch today at 6:49 a.m. EDT. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 1:58 a.m. EDT KSC-99pp0601

Before entering the orbiter Discovery, STS-96 Mission Specialist Julie Payette, with the Canadian Space Agency, is checked out in the white room by Quality Assurance Specialist James Davis (left) and Closeout Crew Chief Travis Thompson (right). In the background, Suit Technician Carlouse Gillis checks another crew member. The white room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm that provides entry to the orbiter crew compartment. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying about 4,000 pounds of supplies, to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-involved experiment. It will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Space Shuttle Discovery is due to launch today at 6:49 a.m. EDT. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 1:58 a.m. EDT KSC-99pp0603

STS-96 Mission Specialist Ellen Ochoa chats with white room closeout crew members while being checked out for entry into the orbiter Discovery. At left are Mechanical Technicians Al Schmidt and Chris meinert; at right is Quality Assurance Specialist James Davis and Closeout Chief Travis Thompson. The white room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm that provides entry to the orbiter crew compartment. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying about 4,000 pounds of supplies, to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-involved experiment. It will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Space Shuttle Discovery is due to launch today at 6:49 a.m. EDT. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 1:58 a.m. EDT KSC-99pp0606

STS-96 Pilot Rick D. Husband is checked out by white room closeout crew members before entering the orbiter Discovery. At left is Closeout Chief Travis Thompson; at right is Quality Assurance Specialist James Davis. The white room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm that provides entry to the orbiter crew compartment. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying about 4,000 pounds of supplies, to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-involved experiment. It will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Space Shuttle Discovery is due to launch today at 6:49 a.m. EDT. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 1:58 a.m. EDT KSC-99pp0602

Before entering the orbiter Discovery, STS-96 Mission Specialist Tamara E. Jernigan is checked out in the white room by Closeout Crew Chief Travis Thompson (back to camera) and Quality Assurance Specialist James Davis. The white room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm that provides entry to the orbiter crew compartment. STS-96 is a 10-day logistics and resupply mission for the International Space Station, carrying about 4,000 pounds of supplies, to be stored aboard the station for use by future crews, including laptop computers, cameras, tools, spare parts, and clothing. The mission also includes such payloads as a Russian crane, the Strela; a U.S.-built crane; the Spacehab Oceaneering Space System Box (SHOSS), a logistics items carrier; and STARSHINE, a student-involved experiment. It will include a space walk to attach the cranes to the outside of the ISS for use in future construction. Space Shuttle Discovery is due to launch today at 6:49 a.m. EDT. Landing is expected at the SLF on June 6 about 1:58 a.m. EDT KSC-99pp0605

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-103 Mission Specialist John M. Grunsfeld (Ph.D.), in his orange launch and entry suit, is assisted by closeout crew members in the White Room before entering the orbiter. At left is United Space Alliance Mechanical Technician Vinny Defranzo and at right is NASA Quality Assurance Specialist Danny Wyatt. The White Room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm on the fixed service structure. It provides entry to the orbiter crew compartment. The mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is scheduled to lift off at 7:50 p.m. EST Dec. 19 on mission STS-103, servicing the Hubble Space Telescope. Objectives for the nearly eight-day mission include replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. Discovery is expected to land at KSC Monday, Dec. 27, at about 5:24 p.m. EST KSC-99pp1484

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-103 Commander Curtis L. Brown Jr., in his orange launch and entry suit, enjoys a laugh with closeout crew members in the White Room before entering the orbiter. From left are United Space Alliance (USA) Mechanical Technician Rene Arriens, USA Orbiter Vehicle Closeout Chief Travis Thompson, and NASA Quality Assurance Specialist Danny Wyatt. The white room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm on the fixed service structure. It provides entry to the orbiter crew compartment. The mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is scheduled to lift off at 7:50 p.m. EST Dec. 19 on mission STS-103, servicing the Hubble Space Telescope. Objectives for the nearly eight-day mission include replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. Discovery is expected to land at KSC Monday, Dec. 27, at about 5:24 p.m. EST KSC-99pp1480

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-103 Mission Specialist Claude Nicollier, in his orange launch and entry suit, shakes hands with NASA Quality Assurance Specialist Danny Wyatt in the White Room before entering the orbiter. Other closeout crew members are United Space Alliance (USA) Suit Technician Ray Cuevas (left) and USA Orbiter Vehicle Closeout Chief Travis Thompson. The White Room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm on the fixed service structure. It provides entry to the orbiter crew compartment. The mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is scheduled to lift off at 7:50 p.m. EST Dec. 19 on mission STS-103, servicing the Hubble Space Telescope. Objectives for the nearly eight-day mission include replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. Discovery is expected to land at KSC Monday, Dec. 27, at about 5:24 p.m. EST KSC-99pp1481

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- In the White Room, STS-103 Mission Specialists Steven L. Smith and Jean-Francois Clervoy, in their orange launch and entry suits, are getting ready to enter Space Shuttle Discovery. Assisting them are closeout crew members (from left) United Space Alliance (USA) Mechanical Technician Rene Arriens, NASA Quality Assurance Specialist Danny Wyatt, USA Orbiter Vehicle Closeout Chief Travis Thompson and USA Mechanical Technician Vinny Defranzo. The White Room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm on the fixed service structure. It provides entry to the orbiter crew compartment. The mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is scheduled to lift off at 7:50 p.m. EST Dec. 19 on mission STS-103, servicing the Hubble Space Telescope. Objectives for the nearly eight-day mission include replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. Discovery is expected to land at KSC Monday, Dec. 27, at about 5:24 p.m. EST KSC-99pp1486

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- STS-103 Mission Specialist Steven L. Smith, in his orange launch and entry suit, waits for assistance from closeout crew members in the White Room before entering the orbiter. From left, they are NASA Quality Assurance Specialist Danny Wyatt, United Space Alliance (USA) Mechanical Technician Vinny Defranzo and USA Orbiter Vehicle Closeout Chief Travis Thompson. The White Room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm on the fixed service structure. It provides entry to the orbiter crew compartment. The mission, to service the Hubble Space Telescope, is scheduled to lift off at 7:50 p.m. EST Dec. 19 on mission STS-103, servicing the Hubble Space Telescope. Objectives for the nearly eight-day mission include replacing gyroscopes and an old computer, installing another solid state recorder, and replacing damaged insulation in the telescope. Discovery is expected to land at KSC Monday, Dec. 27, at about 5:24 p.m. EST KSC-99pp1485

STS-99 Mission Specialist Mamoru Mohri of Japan holds a memento from friends before entering orbiter Endeavour. With him are members of the White Room closeout crew, Chris Meinert (left), closeout chief, and Jack Burritt (background), Quality Assurance specialist. The White Room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm, on the fixed service structure, that provides entry to the orbiter crew compartment. STS-99, known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Scheduled for liftoff at 12:30 p.m. EST, the mission is expected to last 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Tuesday, Feb. 22, at 4:36 p.m. EST. This is the 97th Shuttle flight and 14th for Shuttle Endeavour KSC00pp0232

STS-99 Mission Specialist Mamoru Mohri of Japan holds a memento from friends before entering orbiter Endeavour. With him are members of the White Room closeout crew, Chris Meinert (left), closeout chief, and Jack Burritt (background), Quality Assurance specialist. The White Room is an environmental chamber at the end of the orbiter access arm, on the fixed service structure, that provides entry to the orbiter crew compartment. STS-99, known as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), will chart a new course to produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Scheduled for liftoff at 12:30 p.m. EST, the mission is expected to last 11days, with Endeavour landing at KSC Tuesday, Feb. 22, at 4:36 p.m. EST. This is the 97th Shuttle flight and 14th for Shuttle Endeavour KSC-00pp0232

STS-92 Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata of Japan (center) gets help from United Space Alliance Mechanical Technician Vinny Difranzo (left) and NASA Quality Assurance Specialist Danny Wyatt (right) in suiting up in the White Room. Wakata and other crew members are taking part in a simulated countdown KSC for Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 at 9:38 p.m. EDT on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. It will carry two elements of the Space Station, the Integrated Truss Structure Z1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The mission is also the 100th flight in the Shuttle program KSC-00pp1371

STS-92 Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata of Japan (center) gets help from United Space Alliance Mechanical Technician Vinny Difranzo (left) and NASA Quality Assurance Specialist Danny Wyatt (right) in suiting up in the White Room. Wakata and other crew members are taking part in a simulated countdown KSC for Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test (TCDT) activities. STS-92 is scheduled to launch Oct. 5 at 9:38 p.m. EDT on the fifth flight to the International Space Station. It will carry two elements of the Space Station, the Integrated Truss Structure Z1 and the third Pressurized Mating Adapter. The mission is also the 100th flight in the Shuttle program KSC00pp1371