PICRYL
PICRYL

The World's Largest Public Domain Source

  • homeHome
  • searchSearch
  • photo_albumStories
  • collectionsCollections
  • infoAbout
  • star_rateUpgrade
  • account_boxLogin

Port Royal houses, Naples, Florida. Dr. Arp house

Amanda-Sue Arp daughter of STAFF Sergeant Jerry Arp, 31st Communications Squadron, network administrator, performs a karate routine, during the family fair at Aviano, Air Base, Italy

US Air Force (USAF) Technical Sergeant (TSGT) Jerry Arp, a Communications-Computer Systems Operations Craftsman, with the 606th Air Control Squadron (ACS), Spangdahlem Air Base (AB), Germany (DEU), drinks water from his canteen while wearing his Mission-Oriented Protective Postures (MOPP) gear, during a simulated chemical weapons attack in support of Exercise Autumn Warrior '03

U.S. Air Force AIRMAN 1ST Class Robbie Arp, a broadcaster from Det. 6, American Forces Network, gives Lajes Field High School student Devlen Polite a chance to experience what it's like to be on television during Military Career Day at Lajes Field, Azores, Portugal, on Nov. 18, 2004. (USAF PHOTO by STAFF SGT. Michelle Michaud) (Released)

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At a lab at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Bob Arp, an aerospace technician with the United Launch Alliance, examinies the pins remaining to be soldered to the socket of the replacement feed-through connector that will be installed in the external fuel tank for space shuttle Atlantis' STS-122 mission. The technician performed this exacting task on the Centaur upper stage for Atlas and Titan launches in 1994 and was specifically chosen for the task. Soldering the connector pins and sockets together addresses the most likely cause of a problem in the engine cutoff sensor system, or ECO system. Some of the tank's ECO sensors failed during propellant tanking for launch attempts on Dec. 6 and Dec. 9. Results of a tanking test on Dec. 18 pointed to an open circuit in the feed-through connector wiring, which is located at the base of the tank. The feed-through connector passes the wires from the inside of the tank to the outside. After the soldering is completed and the connector is reinstalled, shuttle program managers will decide on how to proceed. The launch date for mission STS-122 is under review. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd0009

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At a lab at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Bob Arp, an aerospace technician with the United Launch Alliance, inserts a wire from an electrical harness onto the pin of a replacement feed-through connector during preparations to solder the pins to the socket of the connector. The connector will be installed in the external fuel tank for space shuttle Atlantis' STS-122 mission. The technician performed this exacting task on the Centaur upper stage for Atlas and Titan launches in 1994 and was specifically chosen for the task. Soldering the connector pins and sockets together addresses the most likely cause of a problem in the engine cutoff sensor system, or ECO system. Some of the tank's ECO sensors failed during propellant tanking for launch attempts on Dec. 6 and Dec. 9. Results of a tanking test on Dec. 18 pointed to an open circuit in the feed-through connector wiring, which is located at the base of the tank. The feed-through connector passes the wires from the inside of the tank to the outside. After the soldering is completed and the connector is reinstalled, shuttle program managers will decide on how to proceed. The launch date for mission STS-122 is under review. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd0005

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At a lab at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Bob Arp, an aerospace technician with the United Launch Alliance, solders a pin to the socket of the replacement feed-through connector that will be installed in the external fuel tank for space shuttle Atlantis' STS-122 mission. The technician performed this exacting task on the Centaur upper stage for Atlas and Titan launches in 1994 and was specifically chosen for the task. Soldering the connector pins and sockets together addresses the most likely cause of a problem in the engine cutoff sensor system, or ECO system. Some of the tank's ECO sensors failed during propellant tanking for launch attempts on Dec. 6 and Dec. 9. Results of a tanking test on Dec. 18 pointed to an open circuit in the feed-through connector wiring, which is located at the base of the tank. The feed-through connector passes the wires from the inside of the tank to the outside. After the soldering is completed and the connector is reinstalled, shuttle program managers will decide on how to proceed. The launch date for mission STS-122 is under review. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-08pd0006

Arp 148& - Mayall Object

Urban Training

Urban Training

Wartime medical equipment at the Elswick Works