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Mr. Dawson's motion, amended. Resolved by the Senate and House of representatives of the United States of America, in Congress assembled ... that the following article be proposed to the legislatures of the several states as an amendment to the

James Madison, July 09, 1803. Proposed amendment to the Constitution regarding Louisiana.

Draft of a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution on the purchase of Louisiana

Draft of a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution on the purchase of Louisiana

Draft of a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution on the purchase of Louisiana

Draft of a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution on the purchase of Louisiana

At a General Assembly of the State of Connecticut, holden at New Haven in said State, on the first Wednesday of May, A. D. 1838. An act proposing to the people an amendment to the constitution ... Approved, June 1, 1838.

15th Amendment, or the Darkey's millenium: 40 acres of land and a mule.

15th Amendment, or the Darkey's millenium: 40 acres of land and a mule.

Fifteenth Amendment - a good specimen.

Fifteenth Amendment - a good specimen.

Stamp duties imposed by the act of Congress of July 1, 1862 and its amendment of March 3, 1863. New York: Published by Macoy & Herwig, stationers. [c. 1863].

[Concurrent resolution, received at Department of State June 16, 1866.] Joint resolution proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States ... Article XIV .... [Washington, 1866].

15th Amendment bringing his crop to town. [Man on an oxcart loaded with hay.]

15th Amendment bringing his crop to town. [Man on an oxcart loaded with hay.]

15th Amendment bringing his crop to town. [Man on an oxcart loaded with hay.]

15th Amendment bringing his crop to town. [Man on an oxcart loaded with hay.]

15th Amendment bringing his crop to town. [Man on an oxcart loaded with hay.]

Abolishing Slavery. Joint resolution of the thirty eight Congress of the United States of America, proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States, abolishing slavery.

15th Amendment bringing his crop to town. [Man on an oxcart loaded with hay.]

15th Amendment bringing his crop to town. [Man on an oxcart loaded with hay.]

15th Amendment bringing his crop to town. [Man on an oxcart loaded with hay.]

15th Amendment bringing his crop to town. [Man on an oxcart loaded with hay.]

15th Amendment bringing his crop to town. [Man on an oxcart loaded with hay.]

15th Amendment bringing his crop to town. [Man on an oxcart loaded with hay.]

15th Amendment bringing his crop to town. [Man on an oxcart loaded with hay.]

15th Amendment bringing his crop to town. [Man on an oxcart loaded with hay.]

15th Amendment bringing his crop to town. [Man on an oxcart loaded with hay.]

15th Amendment bringing his crop to town. [Man on an oxcart loaded with hay.]

15th Amendment bringing his crop to town. [Man on an oxcart loaded with hay.]

"All men free and equal." The XVth amendment proclaimed. Message to Congress. - Proclamation of the President ... New Haven, Conn. J. H. Benham & son, printers [1870].

15th Amendment, Jacksonville.

15th Amendment, Jacksonville.

Petition for a Woman Suffrage Amendment

Map Showing Amendment 7 27/100 Miles Long of the Eighth Section of Twenty Miles of the Arkansas and Choctaw Railway Company in the Chickasaw Nation

Map Showing Amendment 6 94/100 Miles Long of the Ninth Section of Twenty Miles of The Arkansas and Choctaw Railway Company in the Chickasaw Nation

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Opposition to resolution for suffrage amendment

Petition to the Chairman and Members of the Senate Judiciary Committee to support suffrage amendment

Opposition to resolution for suffrage amendment; page 2

Joint Resolution Memorializing Congress to submit suffrage amendment to states for ratification

Suffragists Make Pleas at Congressional hearings on suffrage amendment

Women's Suffrage Gains Point. House Judiciary Committee agrees to submit adverse report of suffrage amendment to full House

Miss Anna McCue is one of the organizers of the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage. She began work as a child in the hosiery mills in Kensington, Philadelphia and worked in the Kensington factories until 22 years old when she became an organizer for the Congressional Union. Since that time she has been one of the most powerful speakers in the work for the national suffrage amendment, making a very effective appeal because of her intimate acquaintance with the hardships involved in the life of the wage earning woman.

18th Amendment of the Constitution

Map Showing Amendment of the Amended Location of the Definite Location of the Missouri, Oklahoma and Gulf Ry. 163 to 187 Inclusive, Choctaw and Chickasaw nation, Indian Territory

Mrs. Mary Hutcheson Page of Boston, Mass. Mrs. Page is President of the Brookline Woman Suffrage Association. She is one of the most active workers for the national suffrage amendment.

[Theatre meeting to demand the Susan B. Anthony amendment for the enfranchisement of women. Wash., D. C.]

The Home Loving Women Do Not Want the Ballot. Vote No To Amendment Eight. Fourth Place on Ballot.

Open air meeting at Washington, D.C., March 1913, calling upon Congress to pass the national woman suffrage amendment. This photograph shows Mrs. John Rogers, sister-in-law of former Secretary of War, Stimpson [Stimson], and a member of the Advisory Council of the Congressional Union for Women Suffrage, speaking.

Open air meeting at Washington, D.C. March 1913, calling upon Congress to pass the national woman suffrage amendment. Mrs. Mary Beard, wife of Professor Charles Beard of Columbia University, and a member of the Executive Committee of the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage, is speaking.

Arrival in Washington in March 1913 of Rosalie Jones' band of pilgrims on their trip from New York to the National Capitol to ask President Wilson to give his support to the national woman suffrage amendment. This photograph shows Washington suffragists escorting the pilgrims through the streets of the Capitol.

Mrs. Juliet Barrett Rublee, Grand Marshal of the procession organized by the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage which on May 9th, 1914 marched to the Capitol to present resolutions gathered in all parts of the United States calling on Congress to take favorable action on the National Woman Suffrage Amendment.

[Horse drawn float declares National American Woman Suffrage Association's support for Bristow-Mondell amendment.]

WOMAN SUFFRAGE. WOMAN VOTERS ASK HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES FOR ACTION ON AMENDMENT.MRS. WILLIAM KENT, CALIFORNIA, 2ND FROM LEFT; MRS. S. B. M. YOUNG,4TH FROM LEFT; ISABELLA MOTT OF NEW YORK, 2ND FROM RIGHT; KATHARINE FISHER OF NEW JERSEY, RIGHT

Nation-wide demonstrations were held on May 2nd in support of Federal Amendment. Envoys from these demonstrations brought petitions to Washington on May 9th and carried them in procession to Congress from Lafayette Square. Five thousand women massed on and about the East Steps of the Capitol singing Ethel Smyth's Hymn of the Women before entering the Rotunda to deliver the petitions.

Members of the Congressional Union pasting advertisements announcing the procession organized by the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage which on May 9th, 1914 marched to the Capitol to present resolutions gathered in all parts of the United States calling upon Congress to take favorable action on the National Woman Suffrage Amendment.

Elsie Hill speaking [at street meeting in St. Paul, Minn., during Prohibition Party convention that endorsed a plank advocating a suffrage amendment, July 1916]

Miss Anne Martin, of Reno, Nevada, legislative chairman of the National Woman's Party on behalf of the national suffrage amendment.

Miss Mildred Glines, chairman Rhode Island, NWP [National Woman's Party]. Through Miss Glines['s] efforts the Rhode Island Legislature has just passed a resolution calling upon Senators to work and vote for amendment.

Officers of the National Woman's Party who will direct the Woman's Liberty Drive which opens on Thanksgiving Day to raise funds to complete the ratification of the federal suffrage amendment. When the drive opens 20 states will have ratified, 19 have already taken favorable action, and a special session has been called in North Dakota for November 25. 16 states are still needed for the adoption of the amendment. These must be secured, according to suffrage leaders, by the first of March in order to enable women of the country to register in the primaries of all states. The Woman's Liberty Drive will be conducted in states which have already ratified the amendment and the funds will be used in campaigns to persuade reluctant governors to call special sessions of their state legislatures. "If special sessions were called a majority in enough of the legislatures is pledged to complete ratification tomorrow," Alice Paul, chairman of the National Woman's Party and Commander-in-Chief of the drive, stated today. Left to right - top row: Mrs. Agnes Morey of Brookline, Massachusetts chairman of Woman's Party. Mrs. Abby Scott Baker of Washington, political chairman, directing drive in New York state. Mrs. Lawrence Lewis of Philadelphia, finance chairman, touring all campaign states. Center: Mrs. O.H. P. Belmont, New York state chairman. Lower row: Mrs. Clara Snell Wolfe of Texas, directing drive in S.W. Mrs. Nelson Whittemore, Detroit, in charge of Michigan drive, state chairman. Mrs. Genevieve Allen, San Francisco, California chairman.

Officers of the National Woman's Party who will direct the Woman's Liberty Drive which opens on Thanksgiving Day to raise funds to complete the ratification of the federal suffrage amendment. When the drive opens 20 states will have ratified, 19 have already taken favorable action, and a special session has been called in North Dakota for November 25. 16 states are still needed for the adoption of the amendment. These must be secured, according to suffrage leaders, by the first of March in order to enable women of the country to register in the primaries of all states. The Woman's Liberty Drive will be conducted in states which have already ratified the amendment and the funds will be used in campaigns to persuade reluctant governors to call special sessions of their state legislatures. "If special sessions were called a majority in enough of the legislatures is pledged to complete ratification tomorrow," Alice Paul, chairman of the National Woman's Party and Commander-in-Chief of the drive, stated today. Left to right - top row: Mrs. Agnes Morey of Brookline, Massachusetts chairman of Woman's Party. Mrs. Abby Scott Baker of Washington, political chairman, directing drive in New York state. Mrs. Lawrence Lewis of Philadelphia, finance chairman, touring all campaign states. Center: Mrs. O.H. P. Belmont, New York state chairman. Lower row: Mrs. Clara Snell Wolfe of Texas, directing drive in S.W. Mrs. Nelson Whittemore, Detroit, in charge of Michigan drive, state chairman. Mrs. Genevieve Allen, San Francisco, California chairman.
Officers of the National Woman's Party who will direct the Woman's Liberty Drive which opens on Thanksgiving Day to raise funds to complete the ratification of the federal suffrage amendment. When the drive opens 20 states will have ratified, 19 have already taken favorable action, and a special session has been called in North Dakota for November 25. 16 states are still needed for the adoption of the amendment. These must be secured, according to suffrage leaders, by the first of March in order to enable women of the country to register in the primaries of all states. The Woman's Liberty Drive will be conducted in states which have already ratified the amendment and the funds will be used in campaigns to persuade reluctant governors to call special sessions of their state legislatures. "If special sessions were called a majority in enough of the legislatures is pledged to complete ratification tomorrow," Alice Paul, chairman of the National Woman's Party and Commander-in-Chief of the drive, stated today. Left to right - top row: Mrs. Agnes Morey of Brookline, Massachusetts chairman of Woman's Party. Mrs. Abby Scott Baker of Washington, political chairman, directing drive in New York state. Mrs. Lawrence Lewis of Philadelphia, finance chairman, touring all campaign states. Center: Mrs. O.H. P. Belmont, New York state chairman. Lower row: Mrs. Clara Snell Wolfe of Texas, directing drive in S.W. Mrs. Nelson Whittemore, Detroit, in charge of Michigan drive, state chairman. Mrs. Genevieve Allen, San Francisco, California chairman.

Conferring over ratification [of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution] at [National Woman's Party] headquarters, Jackson Pl[ace] [Washington, D.C.]. L-R Mrs. Lawrence Lewis, Mrs. Abby Scott Baker, Anita Pollitzer, Alice Paul, Florence Boeckel, Mabel Vernon (standing, right)

Gov. Gardner signing resolution ratifying amendment to U.S. Constitution granting universal franchise to women / Carl Deeg.

WOMAN SUFFRAGE. GOV. SPROUL OF PENNSYLVANIA SIGNING SUFFRAGE AMENDMENT

[National Woman's Party activists watch Alice Paul sew a star onto the NWP Ratification Flag, representing another state's ratification of the 19th Amendment]

Colorado's ratification of suffrage amendment, Dec. 12, 1919.

Gov[ernor] Emmett D. Boyle of Nevada signing resolution for ratification of Nineteenth Amendment to Constitution of U.S. - Mrs. Sadie D. Hurst who presented the resolution, Speaker of the Assembly D.J. Fitzgerald and group of Suffrage Women, Feb. 7, 1920, Carson City, Nevada

Richard Bennett, noted actor, calling at National Woman's Party Headquarters, underwrites the Equal Rights campaign, and declares: - "Certainly I am a feminist and will stand back of you women until the Equal Rights Amendment is passed by Congress." Mr. Bennett is surrounded by a group of National Woman's Party leaders. (Left to right) Anita Pollitzer, National Secretary of the Woman's Party, Richard Bennett, Wilma Henderson, National Organizer: (upper left) Mrs. Everett Bray, a Founder, and Jessica D. Henerson, member of the Massachusetts State Committee.

[Mrs. James Rector of Columbus, Ohio consulting with W.D. Jameson on the suffrage amendment in the Tennessee legislature, with Miss Anita Pollitzer of Charleston, S.C., and Miss Sue White of Nashville, Tenn.] / Service Photographic Co., Columbus, Ohio.

National Woman's Party Headquarters in Nashville, Tenn., in which the campaign for ratification of the suffrage amendment is being conducted, photographed on the day that Parley P. Christensen, presidential nominee for the new Farmer-Labor Party addressed a mass meeting, urging immediate ratification. Left to right: Rankin Smith, Central Trades and Labor Council; Jim F. Nicholson, Business Manager of the Machinist; W.C. Birthright, Secretary of the Tenn. Federation of Labor; Mrs. Anne Calvert Neely, Mississippi state chairman of the National Woman's Party; W.M. Mitchell; Mrs. Mabel Reber, of New York; Mrs. Walter C. Jackson of Murfreesboro; Mrs. Florence Bayard Hilles, of Wilmington, Delaware, member of the Executive Committee of the Woman's Party; Parley P. Christensen, Presidential candidate of the Farmer-Labor Party; Miss Sue White, of Nashville, Tennessee state chairman of the Woman's Party; W.M. Fox, president of the Trades and Labor Council; Miss Mary Winsor of Philadelphia, Pa., member of the Advisory Council of the Woman's Party; Archie Craig; Charles P. Sweeney.

Alice Paul, leader of the feminist movement in America and vice president of the Woman's Party with Mildred Bryan, youngest Colorado feminist in the Garden of the Gods at Colorado Springs where the Party will present its Equal Rights Pageant on September 23rd, launching its western campaign for an amendment to the federal Constitution giving Equal Rights to women.

Mrs. H.T. Upton, prominent Rep. Leader and Secy. of Labor Davis on the amendment to the Child Labor Law

Myrtle Cain, the youngest woman legislator in the country. Farmer-Labor Rep. in the Minn. Legislature, who is in Wash. to secure pledges from the progressives in Congress to vote for the equal rights amendment

Congress would give full consideration to the Equal Rights Amendment. They formed a Valentine's Day deputation to the President. The[y] are L to R- Mrs. Jessica Henderson, Brookline, Mass.; Mrs. Anne Archbold, Maine; Mrs. Wm. Draper, Maine; Sallie Hovey, New Hampshire; Hazel Mac Kaye, Mass.; Gail Laughlin, Maine; Mrs. Ernest Schelling, Maine; Mary Kelly Macarty, Mass.; Mrs. H.O. Havemeyer, Conn.; Elsie Hill, Conn.

Mrs. H.T. Upton, prominent Rep. leader and Secy. Davis conferring on New Child Labor amendment

The progressive group in Congress from Minn. greet Myrtle Cain, Woman Farm Labor Rep. in the Minn. Legislature, upon her arrival in Wash. She brought a mandate from the Minn. progressives that they support the equal rights amendment, lft. to rt.: Rep. Knud Wefald, Sen. Henrick Shipstead, Sen. Magnus Johnson and Miss Cain

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Equal Rights Envoys of the National Woman's Party who motored to Rapid City where the delegation, consisting principally of western women, saw President Coolidge and asked his aid for the Equal Rights Amendment now pending in Congress. The national delegates are here bidding farewell to Rapid City women who organized a branch in support of the Equal Rights program.

[People holding sign: "George Washington said: "The Constitution which at any time exists, till changed by an explicit and authentic act of the whole people, is sacredly obligatory upon all." Uphold the 18th Amendment!"

3 principals before testifying before the subcommittee of the Senate Judiciary Committee at the start of the fight for amendment of the Volstead law

An Automobile Decked Out with Signs and Banners Supporting the Repeal of the 18th Amendment

State of Vermont. Stanley C. Wilson, Governor. A proclamation. Whereas, the seventy-second Congress of the United States, at the second session thereof, proposed an amendment to the constitution of the United States by adopting a joint resolutio

Photograph of Supreme Court Exhibit, Middle Case, The Fourteenth Amendment

Making way for Roosevelt bills. Speaker Joe Byrns, seated, tells a group of newspaper men that everything will be set aside in the House to make way for the president's four point temporary legislative program made necessary by the Supreme Court's NRA decision. The Speaker said that the Congress will NOT instigate a constitutional amendment to circumvent the court's ruling. Bill Donaldson, superintendent of the House Press Gallery, is shown beside the Speaker, 6/6/35

Dorothy Thompson, Journalist. Prominent member [of] NWP [National Woman's Party]. Lectured on feminism at Carleton Hotel, Wash[ington], D.C., Feb. 1936. For Benefit of Equal Rights Amendment Fund. (Wife of Sinclair Lewis, Novelist).

For Constitutional amendment. Washington, D.C., Mar. 22. Senator Burton K. Wheeler of Montana who was the chief witness on the stand today at the Senate Judiciary hearing. He is opposed to the packing of the Supreme Court by legislation. The Senator proposed that the matter be achieved by constitutional ammendment. Saying that the same end May be achieved by letting the people decide, 3/22/1937

Dean Young B. Smith of Columbia School. Washington, D.C., March 25. Young B. Smith, Dean of the Columbia Law Faculty at Columbia University is shown on the stand before the Senate Judiciary Committee. He was opposed the bill saying that it should be done by constitutional amendment. On the suggestion of the Senators he will have the law faculty draw up a bill on his proposals

Indians confer with Rep. Sheppard. Washington D.C. Mar. 2. A Representative body of the California Indians called on Rep. Harry R. Sheppard of Cal. Today to ask the congressman to introduce a bill to place the Indians born since May 1929 would come under the award of 1928. the Indians were successful at the Representative introduced the amendment today. Left to Right: Rep. Harry R. Sheppard of Cal.; Julia Ross Gardner, Piute Indian from Bishop, Inyo County, Cal.; Celestine Pico Von Bullow, a Governor of Cal., Pachanga Indian from Riverside County, Cal.; and Tom Largo, Capuilla Indian from Riverside County, Cal. 3/2/1937

Pittsburgh women urge enactment of amendment to adminsitration's recovery program. Washington, D.C., May 23. Led by Mrs. Arnold M. Replogle, a delegation of Pittsburgh women today called on Senator James J. Davis to urge enactment of a amendment to administration of relief to local bodies, 52338

Opposes Equal Rights Amendment . Washington, D.C., Feb. 7. Dorothy Straus, New York attorney, today testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee against the Equal Rights for Women Constitutional Amendment which is not being considered. The proposed amendment sponsored by Senator Burke and Townsend Reads "men and women shall have equal rights throughout the United States and every place subject to its jurisdiction..."

PRESIDENTIAL NOTE OF WARNING TO CONGRESS. WASHINGTON, D.C. JANUARY 10. A PHOTOGRAPHIC COPY OF THE NOTE PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT SENT TO CONGRESS TODAY WARNING THEM THAT A WAR REFERENDUM AMENDMENT TO THE CONSTITUTION WOULD 'CRIPPLE ANY PRESIDENT' IN HIS CONDUCT OF OUR FOREIGN RELATIONS

Senate battlers on Pure Politics Act. Washington, D.C., Mar 7. At odds on the Senate floor since the inception of The Hatch Act, but good personal friends are Senators Carol Hatch, D. of New Mexico, author of The Act to Purify Politics, and Senator Sherman Minton, Dem., of Indiana. Latest difference to develop was yesterday when Sen. Miller or Arkansas offered an amendment to draw the teeth from the act be allowing federal employes to 'voluntarily' take part in politics. The amendment was intended to be tacked on to a bill to extend the scope of the act to U.S. paid state and city employees. The Indiana senator, Democratic whip on the floor, acted as floor leader for The Miller Amendment, but the bill was defeated by three votes. Today, the two are as good friends as ever, 3-7-40

Ms. Gail Falk Seltzer, a Staff Lawyer for Field Services with the United Mine Workers of America, Work on Black Lung Benefits at the Headquarters in Charleston, West Virginia. In the Foreground is The Baby Bed Her Child Sleeps in While She Works. Ms. Seltzer is a Yale Graduate and Contributor to the Equal Rights Amendment being Considered for Adoption to the U.S. Constitution

[Activist Phyllis Schafly wearing a "Stop ERA" badge, demonstrating with other women against the Equal Rights Amendment in front of the White House, Washington, D.C.]

Photograph of Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) Posters on the Back of a Station Wagon

Signing Ceremony for S 826, Bill Creating the Department of Energy, and HR 692, Small Business Administration Act Amendment. (Mr. Frank Moore) - Rose Garden

CPT Graham, 2nd Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron assists two Afghanistani men off the bus after their arrival in Germany to receive specialized medical treatment. Afghanistani refugees were treated under the auspices of the McCullen amendment, which allows DoD to make available non-combative goods for humanitarian projects

An Afghanistani refugee carries his suitcase and walks toward a waiting Air Force ambulance bus after his arrival on a MAC C-141 Starlifter. Afghanistani refugees were treated under the auspices of the McCullen amendment, which allows DoD to make available non-combative goods for humanitarian projects

Medical personnel from the 2nd Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron offload a litter borne Afghanistani refugee from an ambulance after their arrival in Germany to receive specialized medical treatment. Afghanistani refugees were treated under the auspices of the McCullen amendment, which allows DoD to make available non-combative goods for humanitarian projects

A Air Force Major accompany two Afghanistani refugees walking away from the aircraft that brought them to Germany to receive specialized medical treatment. Afghanistani refugees were treated under the auspices of the McCullen amendment, which allows DoD to make available non-combative goods for humanitarian projects