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View along Adelaide Street with the buildings decorated for the Royal Visit, 1954

View along Adelaide Street with the buildings decorated for the Royal Visit, 1954

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Creator: Unidentified..Location: Brisbane, Queensland. .Description: View along Adelaide Street from George Street with the buildings decorated for the Royal Visit, 1954. Bunting and flags contribute to the exciting occasion of welcoming Queen Elizabeth to Brisbane on her first visit as Queen of Australia. The street is bustling with people and trams are lined up in the middle. Many makes of cars can be seen parked on the side of the street. Overhead tram lines are suspended between the buildings. ..Information about State Library of Queensland’s collection: pictureqld.slq.qld.gov.au/ ( http://pictureqld.slq.qld.gov.au/ )

On 3 February 1954 the newly crowned Queen Elizabeth II stepped ashore in Sydney, becoming the first reigning monarch to visit Australia. Australians turned out in their millions to catch a glimpse of the young Queen. She visited Australia for two months, keeping up a gruelling schedule and it is estimated that almost three-quarters of the Australian population saw the Queen at least once during the visit. From 9 - 18th March she visited Queensland and travelled to Brisbane, Bundaberg, Toowoomba, Cairns, Townsville, Mackay and Rockhampton. This set of photographs has been curated by Margaret Warren, Coordinator Discovery Services at the State Library of Queensland in celebration of Queen Elizabeth's Diamond Jubilee in 2012.

The history of trams, streetcars or trolleys began in the early nineteenth century. The world's first horse-drawn passenger tramway started operating in 1807, it was the Swansea and Mumbles Railway, in Wales, UK. It was switching to steam in 1877, and then, in 1929, by very large (106-seats) electric tramcars, until closure in 1961. Horse Cars The first streetcar in America, developed by John Stephenson, began service in the year 1832 in New York. Harlem Railroad's Fourth Avenue Line ran along the Bowery and Fourth Avenue in New York City. These trams were a horse- or mule-powered, usually two as a team. It was followed in 1835 by New Orleans, Louisiana, which is the oldest continuously operating street railway system in the world, according to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Horsecars were largely replaced by electric-powered trams following the improvement of an overhead trolley system on trams for collecting electricity from overhead wires by Frank J. Sprague. Sprague spring-loaded trolley pole used a wheel to travel along the wire. In late 1887 and early 1888, using his trolley system, Sprague installed the first successful large electric street railway system in Richmond, Virginia. By 1889, 110 electric railways incorporating Sprague's equipment had been begun or planned on several continents. Steam Cars Trams were also powered by steam. The most common type had a small steam locomotive (called a tram engine in the UK) at the head of a line of one or more carriages, similar to a small train. Systems with such steam trams included Christchurch, New Zealand; Adelaide, South Australia; Sydney, Australia and other city systems in New South Wales; Munich, Germany (from August 1883 on), British India (Pakistan) (from 1885) and the Dublin & Blessington Steam Tramway (from 1888) in Ireland. Steam tramways also were used on the suburban tramway lines around Milan and Padua; the last Gamba de Legn ("Peg-Leg") tramway ran on the Milan-Magenta-Castano Primo route in late 1958. The other style of steam tram had the steam engine in the body of the tram, referred to as a tram engine (UK) or steam dummy (US). The most notable system to adopt such trams was in Paris. French-designed steam trams also operated in Rockhampton, in the Australian state of Queensland between 1909 and 1939. Stockholm, Sweden, had a steam tram line at the island of Södermalm between 1887 and 1901. Steam tram engines faded out around 1890s to 1900s, being replaced by electric trams. Cable Cars Another system for trams was the cable car, which was pulled along a fixed track by a moving steel cable. The power to move the cable was normally provided at a "powerhouse" site a distance away from the actual vehicle. The London and Blackwall Railway, which opened for passengers in east London, England, in 1840 used such a system. The first practical cable car line was tested in San Francisco, in 1873. Part of its success is attributed to the development of an effective and reliable cable grip mechanism, to grab and release the moving cable without damage. The second city to operate cable trams was Dunedin in New Zealand, from 1881 to 1957. The San Francisco cable cars, though significantly reduced in number, continue to perform a regular transportation function, in addition to being a well-known tourist attraction. A single cable line also survives in Wellington, New Zealand (rebuilt in 1979 as a funicular but still called the "Wellington Cable Car"). Another system, actually two separate cable lines with a shared power station in the middle, operates from the Welsh town of Llandudno up to the top of the Great Orme hill in North Wales, UK.

date_range

Date

1954
place

Location

102 Adelaide St, Brisbane QLD 4000, Australia-27.46847, 153.02498
Google Map of -27.468466666666664, 153.024975
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Source

State Library of Queensland
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