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Two Tu-95 Bear bomber aircraft, center, and an AN-124 Condor transport aircraft of the Russian military, background, are parked on the flight line beside a B-52H Stratofortress aircraft of the 62nd Bombardment Squadron. The Russian planes are on base as part of an exchange program proposed by Air Force CHIEF of STAFF GEN. Merrill A. McPeak

Two Tu-95 Bear bomber aircraft, center, and an AN-124 Condor transport aircraft of the Russian military, background, are parked on the flight line beside a B-52H Stratofortress aircraft of the 62nd Bombardment Squadron. The Russian planes are on base as part of an exchange program proposed by Air Force CHIEF of STAFF GEN. Merrill A. McPeak

 
 
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Summary

The original finding aid described this photograph as:

Base: Barksdale Air Force Base

State: Louisiana (LA)

Country: United States Of America (USA)

Scene Camera Operator: TSGT. Fernando Serna

Release Status: Released to Public
Combined Military Service Digital Photographic Files

The Tu-95 BEAR was perhaps the most successful bomber produced by Soviet aviation. It was the only bomber deployed by any country to use turboprop engines, which provided extraordinarily long endurance at speeds only slightly less than comparable turbojet-powered heavy bombers. The development of the Tu-95 intercontinental bomber began in the early 1950s. A team under Aleksandr A. Arkhangelsky, Tupolev’s longtime associate, designed the Tu-95 (“Bear”), a huge turboprop bomber that first flew in 1954 and became one of the most durable military aircraft ever built. A huge turboprop bomber first flew in 1954. Tu-95 bombers are still on the frontlines after more than 60 years in service. Two civilian aircraft were derived from these—the Tu-104, which appeared in 1955 and became one of the first jet transports to provide regular passenger service, and the Tu-114 long-range passenger plane, the largest propeller-driven aircraft ever in regular service.

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Date

01/05/1992
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Source

The U.S. National Archives
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Copyright info

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