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They mourn their loss / J.S. Pughe.

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They mourn their loss / J.S. Pughe.

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Print shows William McKinley, Benjamin Harrison, and John Sherman as old women in mourning among gravestones labeled "Here lies our dear McKinley Bill. Ruthlessly assassinated in the flower of its youth by the tariff reform bandits of the 53rd Congress", "Sacred to the memory of the Federal Election Law, annihilated by the guerrillas of the 53rd Congress. R.I.P.", and "Here lies the Sherman Silver Law. Cruelly done to death by G. Cleveland. We bear our loss with fortitude".
Title from item.
Illus. from Puck, v. 36, no. 914, (1894 September 12), centerfold.
Copyright 1894 by Keppler & Schwarzmann.

Benjamin Harrison (August 20, 1833 – March 13, 1901) was an American politician and lawyer who served as the 23rd President of the United States from 1889 to 1893. He was the grandson of the ninth president, William Henry Harrison. Before ascending to the presidency, Harrison established himself as a prominent local attorney, Presbyterian church leader, and politician in Indiana. During the American Civil War, he served the Union as a colonel and later a brevet brigadier general. He was later elected to the U.S. Senate by the Indiana legislature. A Republican, Harrison was elected to the presidency in 1888, defeating the Democratic incumbent Grover Cleveland after conducting one of the first "front-porch" campaigns by delivering short speeches to delegations that visited him in Indianapolis. "We Americans have no commission from God to police the world."

William McKinley (January 29, 1843 – September 14, 1901) was an American politician and lawyer who served as the 25th President of the United States from March 4, 1897, until his assassination in September 1901, six months into his second term. McKinley was the last president to have served in the American Civil War. He promoted the tariffs to protect manufacturers from foreign competition, and in 1900, he secured the passage of the Gold Standard Act. He led the nation in the Spanish–American War of 1898: the U.S. victory was quick and decisive. "The mission of the United States is one of benevolent assimilation."

Alois Senefelder, the inventor of lithography, introduced the subject of colored lithography in 1818. Printers in other countries, such as France and England, were also started producing color prints. The first American chromolithograph—a portrait of Reverend F. W. P. Greenwood—was created by William Sharp in 1840. Chromolithographs became so popular in American culture that the era has been labeled as "chromo civilization". During the Victorian times, chromolithographs populated children's and fine arts publications, as well as advertising art, in trade cards, labels, and posters. They were also used for advertisements, popular prints, and medical or scientific books.

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Date

01/01/1894
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Pughe, J. S. (John S.), 1870-1909, artist
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Library of Congress
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mckinley william
mckinley william
harrison benjamin
harrison benjamin
sherman john
sherman john
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legislation
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grief
mourning clothing and dress
mourning clothing and dress
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tombs and sepulchral monuments
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cemeteries
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cross dressing
reform
reform
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tariffs
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silver question
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cartoons commentary
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chromolithographs
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color
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periodical illustrations
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loss
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pughe
political cartoons
political cartoons
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vintage images
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prints
19th century
19th century
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us presidents
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j s pughe
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j s john s pughe
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