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The tragedy of the seas; or, Sorrow on the ocean, lake, and river, from shipwreck, plague, fire and famine (1841) (14774326501)

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The tragedy of the seas; or, Sorrow on the ocean, lake, and river, from shipwreck, plague, fire and famine (1841) (14774326501)

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Identifier: tragedyofseasors00ellm (find matches)
Title: The tragedy of the seas; or, Sorrow on the ocean, lake, and river, from shipwreck, plague, fire and famine ..
Year: 1841 (1840s)
Authors: Ellms, Charles
Subjects: Shipwrecks
Publisher: New York, Collins, Keese & Co.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress



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r answers, ordered eighteen men out ofthe boats, armed with muskets and fixed bayonets, and cut-lasses, and then, having them in his power, peremptorilydemanded the skulls; but as they were much frightenedand produced none, it was thought probable their story wascorrect. They also stated that the natives of Aureed hadleft the island, having heard that the schooner was on theway to punish them for the murder they had committed ;that all the white men had been murdered, and that someof the skulls had been sent to New Guinea. During thisparley the Indians were shouting loudly for assistance fromtheir friends, but the boats crews were too strong for them.After some time, finding that no satisfactory intelligencewas obtained, room was made for them to pass; upon whichthey scampered off with great rapidity. Two of the sea-men very improperly fired their muskets over their heads;which, however, did not injure them, and served only toincrease the rapidity of their flight. These islanders told
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The terrible Trophy to which the Skulls were affixed. —Pa<re 33. THE LONG-SEARCHED-FOR HEADS FOUND. 33 them that their principal food was cocoa-nuts and yams, andthat they were frequently robbed of them by the Indians ofother islands. On Mr. Lewiss wading across to the southernmost island,the Indians, who were there, escaped in their canoes, andsteered towards the west-south-west. A strict search wasmade all over the island, but no remains of Europeans werefound. The party then returned on board. The next day was occupied in searching amongst theislands. The anchor was dropped in the afternoon near anisland about half a mile off; when a boat visited the shore,but found no trace of what they were in search of. A fewdeserted sheds, used probably when fishing, were the onlymarks of its ever being visited by the Indians. Several,birds, viz., pigeons, quails, and rails, flushed; and an im-mense number of rats were seen. The trees were princi-pally swamp oak and fig; a species of vine,

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1841
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