PICRYL
PICRYLThe World's Largest Public Domain Source
  • homeHome
  • searchSearch
  • photo_albumStories
  • collectionsCollections
  • infoAbout
  • star_rateUpgrade
  • account_boxLogin
The "Spirit of St. Louis", Col. Lindbergh's famous plane

The "Spirit of St. Louis", Col. Lindbergh's famous plane

  • save_altThumbnail200x200
  • save_altSmall512x640
  • save_altMedium819x1024
  • save_altOriginal819x1024
description

Summary

Four sailors with the Spirit of Louis.

Charles Lindbergh (1902 – 1974) was an American aviator, author, inventor, military officer, explorer, and social activist. At age 25, Lindbergh, a U.S. Air Mail pilot, made his  33 1⁄2 hours prize-winning solo nonstop flight from Long Island, New York, to Le Bourget Field in Paris, France. He flew the distance of nearly 3,600 miles (5,800 km) in a single-seat, single-engine, purpose-built Ryan monoplane, Spirit of St. Louis. Lindbergh used his fame and the development of both commercial aviation and Air Mail services in the United States and the Americas. In March 1932, his infant son, Charles Jr., was kidnapped and murdered in what was dubbed the "Crime of the Century". Lindbergh supported the isolationist America First movement, which advocated that America remain neutral during the war, as had his father, Congressman Charles August Lindbergh, during World War I. Nevertheless, Lindbergh publicly supported the war effort after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and flew 50 combat missions in the Pacific Theater of World War II as a civilian consultant. In his later years, Lindbergh became a prolific prize-winning author, international explorer, inventor, and environmentalist.

date_range

Date

01/01/1927
create

Source

Library of Congress
copyright

Copyright info

No known restrictions on publication.

Explorespirit of st louis airplane

Explorelindbergh charles a

Explorecharles augustus