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The political barbecue

The political barbecue

 
 
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Summary

Andrew Jackson is roasted over the fires of "Public Opinion" by the figure of Justice in a cartoon relating to the controversy surrounding Jackson's removal of federal deposits from the Bank of the United States. Jackson, with the body of a pig, is prone on a gridiron over a stone barbecue oven. The fire is stoked by former Secretary of the Treasury William Duane, at lower right, while Jack Downing, lower left, splits kindling. Jack Downing: "I jest split a little kindleying wood, so Amos can jest make Broth for all hands &c." Duane: "I am opposed to Removing the Deposits, as I was when I was Secretary, but prefer gently Stirring them up." Five men, opponents of Jackson's bank program, stand behind the barbecue. They are (from left to right) Senators Henry Clay, Daniel Webster (holding a knife), William B. Preston, Bank president Nicholas Biddle, and an unidentified fifth man. Vice-President Martin Van Buren, as an imp, flies off to the right with a sack of Treasury Notes over his shoulder. Clay: "Dan this is what they call in Kentuc our High Game to their Low Jack." Webster: "In Massachusetts they call it Roasting." Preston: "In South Carolina t'is called Barbecue only he wants a little more Basteing." Biddle: "In Pennsylvania we find it difficult to find a home for the animal but have concluded to call him Nondescript pertaking of the General, Hog, Man and Devil." Fifth man: "We think he pertakes strongly of the Rooter, for he has rooted our treasures all over the country and was squeeling for the Pension-fund when Clay caught him and put a ring in his nose, and we've all given it a twist." Van Buren: "T'is my business to get folks in trouble and their business to get themselves out."
From Henry Clay Esqre's big picter draw'd off from Natur by Zek Downing Historical Painter to Uncle Jack & Jineral Jackson. Second Edition.
Published by H.R. Robinson, 52 Cortlandt St. New York.
Similarities in format, draughtsmanship and its peculiar shadowed lettering which the print shares with "The Vision. Political Hydrophobia" (no. 1834-8), "Political Firmament" and "Political Quixotism" (Murrell nos. 119-120) suggest a series issued in parts by E. Bisbee and possibly pirated by Henry R. Robinson. Weitenkampf lists two other versions of this print, both marked "Second Edition" and published by E. Bisbee.
Title appears as it is written on the item.
Weitenkampf, p. 37.
Forms part of: American cartoon print filing series (Library of Congress)
Published in: American political prints, 1766-1876 / Bernard F. Reilly. Boston : G.K. Hall, 1991, entry 1834-9.

Andrew Jackson was the seventh President of the United States from 1829 to 1837, seeking to act as the direct representative of the common man. "I have always been afraid of banks."

Martin Van Buren was the eighth President of the United States (1837-1841), after serving as the eighth Vice President and the tenth Secretary of State, both under President Andrew Jackson. While the country was prosperous when the "Little Magician" was elected, less than three months later the financial panic of 1837 punctured the prosperity. A member of the Democratic Party, he served in a number of senior roles, including eighth Vice President (1833–37) and tenth Secretary of State (1829–31), both under Andrew Jackson. Van Buren's inability as president to deal with the economic chaos of the Panic of 1837 and with the surging Whig Party led to his defeat in the 1840 election. "The less government interferes with private pursuits, the better for general prosperity."

date_range

Date

01/01/1834
person

Contributors

Robinson, Henry R., -1850.
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Source

Library of Congress
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No known restrictions on publication.