PICRYL
PICRYLThe World's Largest Public Domain Source
  • homeHome
  • searchSearch
  • photo_albumStories
  • collectionsCollections
  • infoAbout
  • star_rateUpgrade
  • account_boxLogin
The infant Jones found in the bed of Mr. Allworthy..., illustration to Henry Fielding's "The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling" (Edinburgh, 1791), Vol. I (Book I, chapter 3)

The infant Jones found in the bed of Mr. Allworthy..., illustration to Henry Fielding's "The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling" (Edinburgh, 1791), Vol. I (Book I, chapter 3)

  • save_altThumbnail200x200
  • save_altSmall640x447
  • save_altMedium1024x716
  • save_altLarge1600x1119
  • save_altOriginal2294x1604
description

Summary

Thomas Rowlandson (British, London 1757–1827 London)

English painter and caricaturist, Thomas Rowlandson (13 July 1756 – 21 April 1827) was noted for his political satire and social observation. The son of a tradesman, Rowlandson became a student in the Royal Academy. At age 16 he went to study in Paris. After establishing a studio as a portrait painter, he began to draw caricatures to supplement his income, and this soon became his major interest. Like other contemporary caricaturists, he produced erotica which was censured by the 1840s. He created comic images of familiar social types of his day and also wrote satirical verse under the pen name of Peter Pindar. His characters ranged from the ridiculous, pretentious, enormous bosoms and bottoms.

By the first half of the 18th century, Edinburgh was one of Europe's most densely populated and overcrowded towns. Various social classes shared the same urban space, even inhabiting the same tenement buildings with lower classes occupying cellars and garrets, and the more established classes occupied the more expensive middle stories. In the second half of the 18th century, the city was at the heart of the Scottish Enlightenment. It became a "hotbed of genius", a major intellectual center, "Athens of the North" because of its numerous neo-classical buildings and reputation for learning, recalling ancient Athens. From the 1770s onwards, the professional and business classes gradually deserted the Old Town in favor of one-family residences of the New Town, changing the city's social character. "Unity of social feeling was one of the most valuable heritages of old Edinburgh, and its disappearance was widely and properly lamented." Although Edinburgh's traditional industries of printing, brewing, and distilling continued to grow in the 19th century and were joined by new rubber works and engineering works, there was little industrialization compared with other cities in Britain. The Old Town became an increasingly dilapidated and overcrowded slum so Lord Provost William Chambers in the 1860s began the transformation of the central part of the city into the Victorian Old Town that exists today.

date_range

Date

1792
create

Source

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
copyright

Copyright info

Exploretom jones

Explorehistory of edinburgh scotland

Exploregeorgian era