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STS066-14-006 - STS-066 - PCG - MS Tanner works on the PCGE Thermal Enclosure System

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CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Department of Energy contractor employees roll the multi-mission radioisotope thermoelectric generator (MMRTG) for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission, enclosed in a protective mesh container known as the "gorilla cage," toward a forklift outside the high bay of the RTG storage facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida for its move to the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF).  The cage protects the MMRTG and allows any excess heat generated to dissipate into the air.  In the PHSF, the MMRTG temporarily will be installed on the MSL rover, Curiosity, for a fit check but will be installed on the rover for launch at the pad.    The MMRTG will generate the power needed for the mission from the natural decay of plutonium-238, a non-weapons-grade form of the radioisotope. Heat given off by this natural decay will provide constant power through the day and night during all seasons. Curiosity, MSL's car-sized rover, has 10 science instruments designed to search for signs of life, including methane, and help determine if the gas is from a biological or geological source. Waste heat from the MMRTG will be circulated throughout the rover system to keep instruments, computers, mechanical devices and communications systems within their operating temperature ranges. Launch of MSL aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket is planned for Nov. 25 from Space Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2011-6669

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Department of Energy contractor employees roll the multi-mission radioisotope thermoelectric generator (MMRTG) for NASA's Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission, enclosed in a protective mesh container known as the "gorilla cage," toward a forklift outside the high bay of the RTG storage facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida for its move to the Payload Hazardous Servicing Facility (PHSF). The cage protects the MMRTG and allows any excess heat generated to dissipate into the air. In the PHSF, the MMRTG temporarily will be installed on the MSL rover, Curiosity, for a fit check but will be installed on the rover for launch at the pad. The MMRTG will generate the power needed for the mission from the natural decay of plutonium-238, a non-weapons-grade form of the radioisotope. Heat given off by this natural decay will provide constant power through the day and night during all seasons. Curiosity, MSL's car-sized rover, has 10 science instruments designed to search for signs of life, including methane, and help determine if the gas is from a biological or geological source. Waste heat from the MMRTG will be circulated throughout the rover system to keep instruments, computers, mechanical devices and communications systems within their operating temperature ranges. Launch of MSL aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket is planned for Nov. 25 from Space Launch Complex 41 on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl. Photo credit: NASA/Cory Huston KSC-2011-6669

STS066-14-006 - STS-066 - PCG - MS Tanner works on the PCGE Thermal Enclosure System

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Summary

The original finding aid described this as:

Description: STS-66 Mission Specialist Joseph Tanner works on the Protein Crystal Growth Experiments/Thermal Enclosure System (PCG/TES) a middeck locker on the Space Shuttle Atlantis. The PCG/TES continues the research into the structure of proteins and other macromolecules such as viruses.

Subject Terms: STS-66, SPACE SHUTTLES, ATLANTIS (ORBITER), MIDDECK, SPACEBORNE EXPERIMENTS, LIFE SCIENCES, MEDICAL SCIENCE, BIOMEDICAL DATA, PROTEINS, CRYSTAL GROWTH, ASTRONAUTS

Date Taken: 9/25/1997

Categories: Onboard Operations

Interior_Exterior: Interior

Ground_Orbit: On-orbit

Original: Film - 35MM CN

Preservation File Format: TIFF
STS-66

Space Shuttle Atlantis was a space shuttle that was operated by NASA as part of the Space Shuttle program. It was the fourth operational shuttle built, and the last one to be built before the program was retired in 2011. Atlantis was named after the first research vessel operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and it made its first flight in October 1985. Over the course of its career, Atlantis completed 33 missions and spent a total of 307 days in space. Its last mission was STS-135, which was the final mission of the Space Shuttle program. Atlantis is now on display at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida. Space Shuttle Atlantis (Orbiter Vehicle Designation: OV-104) was one of the four first operational orbiters in the Space Shuttle fleet of NASA, the space agency of the United States. (The other two are Discovery and Endeavour.) Atlantis was the fourth operational shuttle built. Atlantis is named after a two-masted sailing ship that operated from 1930 to 1966 for the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute. Atlantis performed well in 25 years of service, flying 33 missions.

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1997
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Source

The U.S. National Archives
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