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Skioptikonbild med motiv från kyrkan Sacre Coeur i Paris.Bilden har förvarats i kartong märkt: ?

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Skioptikonbild med motiv från kyrkan Sacre Coeur i Paris.Bilden har förvarats i kartong märkt: ?

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Skioptikonbild med motiv från kyrkan Sacre Coeur i Paris.Bilden har förvarats i kartong märkt: ?

The Grand Tour of Europe was the 17th- and 18th-century custom of a traditional trip of Europe undertaken by upper-class young European men when they had come of age (about 21 years old). A Grand Tour could last anywhere from several months to several years. The tradition declined as enthusiasm for neo-classical culture waned, and with the advent of accessible rail and steamship travel, however, lengthy travel tours of Europe had become a regular feature of the upper-class lifestyle in Northern and Central Europe and no more restricted to the higher nobility.

After the Paris exposition of 1889, France gloried in her triumph. The time between the expositions of 1889 and 1900 was an era of economic prosperity. When Germans announced they want to hold the next world expo, French politicians, industrialists, and intellectuals realized that the country which hosted the exposition at the threshold of the new century "will define the philosophy and express the synthesis of the 19th century." Participating nations architects were given complete freedom to construct their national pavilions in any style, and display whatever they wished therein. The sole limit was the space assigned to each. The buildings of the 1900 exposition fall into two distinct categories, each representing an essential element of the spirit of 1900: Traditionalist 19th century-styled and Art Nouveau - the new style appropriate to the twentieth century. The pavilion to symbolize the new era was the Palace of Electricity. Many expositions gave visitors an illusory trip to remote lands. The Trans-Siberian was a simulated Peking to Moscow railway and "Tour of the World," located at the base of the Eiffel Tower featured moving canvas of the sights and people throughout the world. More than 83,000 exhibitors and attendance of 51 million visitors made it the largest of any exposition. The 127 congresses had attracted over 80,000 participants. The Gare d'Orsay railroad station (now the Musée d'Orsay), and two of original entrances of Paris Métro stations by Hector Guimard., and the Pont d’Alexandre, the Grand Palais and the Petit Palais opened with the exposition. The exposition Universelle of 1900 was the last of its kind held in France.

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01/01/1900
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