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Sketches of Lecomptonism [no. 2]

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Sketches of Lecomptonism [no. 2]

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Four designs for magic lantern slides, images 2, 3, and two unnumbered showing men standing on a platform before a crowd, the flag of the United States and a devil behind them, as a man below approaches them wielding a knife. Two African Americans are lynched before the same crowd. The scene of a large outdoor feast in a newly cleared area, perhaps a depiction of the first celebration of Thanksgiving is the subject of an unnumbered slide. Lecomptonism became the rallying cry of the People's Party in the 1860 election. The pro-slavery Lecompton Constitution was formulated and ratified in 1857 in the territorial capitol of Kansas after an election in which voters were given a choice only between limited or unlimited slavery; free state men refused to cast their ballots. The issue of admitting Kansas as a slave state split the Democratic Party, and in 1858 Kansas voters rejected the Lecompton Constitution. Kansas was admitted as a free state in 1861.
The story continues from DRWG/US - Unattributed, no. 44 (B size).
Matted with DRWG/US - Unattributed, no. 44 (B size).

The lantern slides first produced for the 17th century's “magic lantern” devices. The magic lantern, also known by its Latin name Lanterna Magica, an image projector that used pictures on transparent plates (usually made of glass), one or more lenses, and a light source, used for entertainment. The earliest slides for magic lanterns consisted of hand-painted images on glass, made to amuse their audiences. After the invention of photography, lantern slides began to be produced photographically as black-and-white positive images, created with the wet collodion or a dry gelatine process. Photographic slides were made from a base piece of glass, with the emulsion (photo) on it, then a matte over that, and then a top piece of a cover glass. Sometimes, colors have been added by hand, tinting the images. Lantern slides created a new way to view photography: the projection of the magic lantern allowed for a large audience. Photographic lantern slides reached the peak of their popularity during the first third of the 20th century impacting the development of animation as well as visual-based education.

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01/01/1857
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lynchings
lynchings
race discrimination
race discrimination
slavery
slavery
thanksgiving day
thanksgiving day
drawings
drawings
american
american
sketches
sketches
lecomptonism
lecomptonism
lecomptonism no
lecomptonism no
1857
1857
kansas
kansas
sports
sports
kansas sports
kansas sports
drawings documentary
drawings documentary
drawing
drawing
ultra high resolution
ultra high resolution
high resolution
high resolution
democratic party
democratic party
democratic party us
democratic party us
flag
flag