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PSM V16 D512 Map of the world 10th century

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PSM V16 D512 Map of the world 10th century

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Map of the world 10th century

Greek and Roman World Maps Anaximander was an ancient Greek philosopher and mathematician who lived in the 6th century BCE. He is credited with being the first Greek to create a map of the known world, which he did around 550 BCE. Anaximander's map was based on the idea that the Earth was a cylindrical shape, with the inhabited part located on the top. Hecataeus of Miletus was an ancient Greek historian and geographer who lived in the 6th century BCE. He is known for his work "Periegesis" ("Description of the World"), which is considered the first known Greek geography text. In this work, Hecataeus described the various regions of the known world and provided information on their peoples, customs, and natural resources. Posidonius, 1st century BCE, is known for his work on geography, he was a skilled geographer who traveled widely and gathered detailed information on the geography of the known world. He is credited with creating the first known map of the entire world, which he did around 100 BCE. Pomponius Mela, 1st century CE is known for his work "De Chorographia," which is a treatise on geography. "De Chorographia" was the first Latin geography text. Marinus of Tyre was an ancient Greek geographer and cartographer who lived in the 2nd century CE. He is known for his work on geography and for his contributions to the development of maps and mapmaking. According to ancient sources, Marinus created a map of the known world that was considered to be the most accurate and detailed of its time. Ptolemy, who lived in the 2nd century CE, is best known for his work "Geographia," which is a treatise on geography that includes a detailed description of the known world and a set of maps illustrating various regions. Ptolemy's maps are considered some of the most accurate and detailed of the ancient world, and they were widely used and influential in the centuries that followed. Ptolemy's maps are based on a coordinate system that he developed, which is still used in modern cartography. Medieval World Maps A T-O map is a type of medieval European map that represents the known world as a circle (the "O") divided into three parts by a "T" shape. The three parts of the "T" represent the three known continents: Europe, Asia, and Africa. The Mediterranean Sea is typically shown at the center of the map, with Europe to the northwest, Asia to the east, and Africa to the south. T-O maps were popular in the Middle Ages and were used to illustrate various texts, including geographical and religious texts. They were based on the idea that the world was divided into three parts, with Jerusalem at the center, and were often accompanied by illustrations of the Garden of Eden, the Tower of Babel, and other biblical scenes. Ibn Hawqal, an Arab geographer and cartographer, 10th century CE, is known for his work "Book of Roads and Kingdoms," which is a detailed description of the known world and a set of maps illustrating various regions. The Ebstorf Mappa Mundi is a medieval map of the world that was created in the 13th century. It is a large, detailed map that depicts the known world as it was understood at the time. The map is named after the town of Ebstorf, where it was discovered in the 19th century. The Ebstorf Mappa Mundi is a circular map that is divided into four sections, with Jerusalem at the center. It depicts the various regions of the known world, including Europe, Asia, and Africa, and includes illustrations of various cities, mountains, rivers, and other geographical features. The map also includes illustrations of various biblical and historical events, including the Tower of Babel and the life of Jesus. The Hereford Mappa Mundi is a medieval map of the world that was created in the early 14th century. It is a large, detailed map that depicts the known world as it was understood at the time. The map is named after the city of Hereford, where it is housed in the cathedral library. The Hereford Mappa Mundi is a circular map that is divided into four sections, with Jerusalem at the center. It depicts the various regions of the known world, including Europe, Asia, and Africa, and includes illustrations of various cities, mountains, rivers, and other geographical features. The map also includes illustrations of various biblical and historical events, as well as mythical creatures and legends. Pietro Vesconte is known for his work on maps and atlases, and his most notable work is a world map that he created in 1321, which is considered to be one of the earliest known maps to use the term "ocean" to refer to the bodies of water surrounding the known world.

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1879 - 1880
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Wikimedia Commons
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public domain

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10th century maps of the world
10th century maps of the world