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"President"--"Rutherford B. Hayes", Head and Shoulders Portrait

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"President"--"Rutherford B. Hayes", Head and Shoulders Portrait

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Summary

Print shows President Rutherford B. Hayes, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing left.
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Copyrighted by G. F. Gilman 1877.

Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 – January 17, 1893) was the 19th President of the United States (1877–81). As a president, he attempted to reconcile the divisions left over from the Civil War. He was a prominent attorney and politician in Ohio when the Civil War began. He joined the Union Army as an officer and was wounded five times, earned a reputation for bravery in combat and was promoted to the rank of major general. After the war, he served in the U.S. Congress as a Republican and was elected as a Governor of Ohio for two terms, and then to a third term. In 1876, Hayes was elected president in one of the most contentious elections in national history. He lost the popular vote to Democrat Samuel J. Tilden but he won an intensely disputed electoral college vote after a Congressional commission awarded him twenty contested electoral votes. Hayes believed in meritocratic government, equal treatment without regard to race, and improvement through education. Hayes kept his pledge not to run for re-election, retired to his home in Ohio, and became an advocate of social and educational reform. Biographer Ari Hoogenboom says his greatest achievement was to restore popular faith in the presidency and to reverse the deterioration of executive power that had set in after Abraham Lincoln's death. "The filth and noise of the crowded streets soon destroy the elasticity of health which belongs to the country boy."

Alois Senefelder, the inventor of lithography, introduced the subject of colored lithography in 1818. Printers in other countries, such as France and England, were also started producing color prints. The first American chromolithograph—a portrait of Reverend F. W. P. Greenwood—was created by William Sharp in 1840. Chromolithographs became so popular in American culture that the era has been labeled as "chromo civilization". During the Victorian times, chromolithographs populated children's and fine arts publications, as well as advertising art, in trade cards, labels, and posters. They were also used for advertisements, popular prints, and medical or scientific books.

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Date

01/01/1877
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Contributors

Gilman, G. F., copyright claimant
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Source

Library of Congress
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No known restrictions on publication.

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facing left
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