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Open air meeting at Washington, D.C. March 1913, calling upon Congress to pass the national woman suffrage amendment. Mrs. Mary Beard, wife of Professor Charles Beard of Columbia University, and a member of the Executive Committee of the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage, is speaking.

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Open air meeting at Washington, D.C. March 1913, calling upon Congress to pass the national woman suffrage amendment. Mrs. Mary Beard, wife of Professor Charles Beard of Columbia University, and a member of the Executive Committee of the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage, is speaking.

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Summary

Summary: Photograph of the back of Mary Beard, standing in car, speaking to crowd on street, Interior Dept. building in background. Automobiles and trolley on street.
Title transcribed from item. A duplicate image in the same file identifies the speakers as Mrs. Glendower Evans and Mrs. [Nina] Allender, speaking before the Interior Department. Another duplicate image in the same file has a handwritten caption identifying the speaker as Mary Beard, speaking at a Street meeting in Washington, Mar. 3, 1913 parade.

Columbia University is a private Ivy League research university in Upper Manhattan, New York City. It was established in 1754 as King's College by royal charter of George II of Great Britain. Columbia is the oldest college in the state of New York and the fifth chartered institution of higher learning in the country, making it one of nine colonial colleges founded before the Declaration of Independence. After the American Revolutionary War, King's College was renamed Columbia College in 1784. A 1787 charter placed the institution under a private board of trustees before it was renamed Columbia University in 1896.

The automobile was first invented and perfected in Germany and France in the late 1890s. Americans quickly came to dominate the automotive industry after WWI. Throughout this initial era, the development of automotive technology was rapid. Hundreds of small manufacturers competing to gain the world's attention. Key developments included the electric ignition system, independent suspension, and four-wheel brakes. Transmissions and throttle controls were widely adopted and safety glass also made its debut. Henry Ford perfected mass-production techniques, and Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler emerged as the “Big Three” auto companies by the 1920s. Car manufacturers received enormous orders from the military during World War II, and afterward automobile production in the United States, Europe, and Japan soared.

date_range

Date

01/01/1913
person

Contributors

Harris & Ewing, Washington, D.C. (Photographer)
place

Location

Washington, District of Columbia, United States38.90719, -77.03687
Google Map of 38.9071923, -77.03687070000001
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Source

Library of Congress
copyright

Copyright info

Public Domain

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