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Not this time! / Dalrymple.

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Not this time! / Dalrymple.

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Summary

Print shows President Cleveland at the helm of the "Ship of State", it's sails labeled "Honest Pensions, Wilson Tariff Bill, Sound Financial Policy, Adherence to the Traditional Policy of Non-Interference", [and] Economic Government", as it sails past the "Rocks of Disaster" upon which are the remains of a shipwreck labeled "Sherman Silver Law, McKinley Bill, Fraudulent Pensions, [and] Jingoism" and a group of marooned sailors labeled "McKinley, Lodge, Tom Reed, [and] Quay", also present are Benjamin Harrison, Whitelaw Reid, George F. Hoar, and William E. Chandler.
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Caption: The political wreckers see their hopes again indefinately postponed.
Illus. from Puck, v. 37, no. 939, (1895 March 6), centerfold.
Copyright 1895 by Keppler & Schwarzmann.

Benjamin Harrison (August 20, 1833 – March 13, 1901) was an American politician and lawyer who served as the 23rd President of the United States from 1889 to 1893. He was the grandson of the ninth president, William Henry Harrison. Before ascending to the presidency, Harrison established himself as a prominent local attorney, Presbyterian church leader, and politician in Indiana. During the American Civil War, he served the Union as a colonel and later a brevet brigadier general. He was later elected to the U.S. Senate by the Indiana legislature. A Republican, Harrison was elected to the presidency in 1888, defeating the Democratic incumbent Grover Cleveland after conducting one of the first "front-porch" campaigns by delivering short speeches to delegations that visited him in Indianapolis. "We Americans have no commission from God to police the world."

Alois Senefelder, the inventor of lithography, introduced the subject of colored lithography in 1818. Printers in other countries, such as France and England, were also started producing color prints. The first American chromolithograph—a portrait of Reverend F. W. P. Greenwood—was created by William Sharp in 1840. Chromolithographs became so popular in American culture that the era has been labeled as "chromo civilization". During the Victorian times, chromolithographs populated children's and fine arts publications, as well as advertising art, in trade cards, labels, and posters. They were also used for advertisements, popular prints, and medical or scientific books.

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Date

01/01/1895
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Contributors

Dalrymple, Louis, 1866-1905, artist
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Source

Library of Congress
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