The World's Largest Public Domain Media Search Engine
Narrative of the Canadian Red River Exploring Expedition of 1857 - and of the Assinniboine and Saskatchewan Exploring Expedition of 1858 (1860) (14591956900)

Similar

Narrative of the Canadian Red River Exploring Expedition of 1857 - and of the Assinniboine and Saskatchewan Exploring Expedition of 1858 (1860) (14591956900)

description

Summary


Identifier: narrativeofcanad11860hind (find matches)
Title: Narrative of the Canadian Red River Exploring Expedition of 1857 : and of the Assinniboine and Saskatchewan Exploring Expedition of 1858
Year: 1860 (1860s)
Authors: Hind, Henry Youle, 1823-1908 Weller, Edward, d. 1884, engraver Arrowsmith, John, 1790-1873, cartographer Hime, Humphrey Lloyd, photographer Fleming, John, 1836-1876, ill Hayden, F. V. (Ferdinand Vandeveer), 1829-1887, former owner. DSI Allen, Edward G., associated name. DSI Spottiswoode & Co., printer of plates Canada. Library of Parliament, former owner. DSI Assinniboine & Saskatchewan Exploring Expedition (1858)
Subjects: Hind, Henry Youle, 1823-1908 Assinniboine & Saskatchewan Exploring Expedition (1858) Geology Indians of North America
Publisher: London : Longman, Green, Longman, and Roberts
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library



Text Appearing Before Image:
les from the source of EainyEiver, is situated on the right bank, in lat. 48° 36, andlongitude 93° 33 W. Mr. Pether, the gentleman then incharge, stated that the river never freezes between thefalls and the Little Fork, a distance of twelve miles, norbetween the falls and its source in Eainy Lake. Wheatis sown at this establishment of the Honourable HudsonsBay Company, from the 20 th to the 23rd of May; itripens about 1st September. Potatoes, turnips, carrots,and indeed all common culinary vegetables succeed well. THE LAC LA PLUIE INDIANS. 83 Potatoes are dug in the first week of October, and barleyis ripe by the middle of August. Snow falls here to thedepth of four feet. The great enemies to extended cultivation are the Lacla Pluie Indians. They are not only numerous, but veryindependent; and although diminishing in numbers, theyfrequently hold near Fort Frances their grand medicineceremonies, at which 500 and 600 individuals some-times assemble. The number of Indians visiting this
Text Appearing After Image:
Ojibways at Fort Frances, Kainy Kiver. fort for the purpose of trade, reaches 1,500. They donot scruple to jump over the fences, and run through thegrowing crops, if the ball in their games is driven in thatdirection. In the immediate neighbourhood of Fort Frances, theswamp or morass bounding the valley of Eainy Eiver onthe right bank, is about half a mile in its rear. Thisswamp, which extends from Eainy Lake to the Lake of 84 RED RIVER EXPLORING EXPEDITION. the Woods, is described by Mr. Pettier, and the Indianswho were questioned about it, as consisting of a springy,movable surface, overlying a vast deposit of peat, throughwhich a pole might frequently be pushed to the depth ofthirty feet without reaching the bottom. The surfacesustains low bushes, with here and there islands of smallpine. Its borders approach and recede from Eainy Eiverwith the windings of that stream ; the breadth of the drywooded and fertile valley varying from half a mile in therear of Fort Frances, to six or ei

date_range

Date

1860
create

Source

Smithsonian Libraries
copyright

Copyright info

public domain

Explore more

narrative of the canadian red river exploring expedition of 1857 and of the assinniboine and saskatchewan exploring expedition of 1858 1860
narrative of the canadian red river exploring expedition of 1857 and of the assinniboine and saskatchewan exploring expedition of 1858 1860