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"My country, 'tis of thee!" or, The United States of America; past, present and future. A philosophic view of American history and of our present status, to be seen in the Columbian exhibition (1892) (14761683706)

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"My country, 'tis of thee!" or, The United States of America; past, present and future. A philosophic view of American history and of our present status, to be seen in the Columbian exhibition (1892) (14761683706)

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Identifier: mycountrytisofth00john (find matches)
Title: "My country, 'tis of thee!" or, The United States of America; past, present and future. A philosophic view of American history and of our present status, to be seen in the Columbian exhibition
Year: 1892 (1890s)
Authors: Johnson, Willis Fletcher, 1857-1931 Habberton, John, 1842-1921
Subjects:
Publisher: Philadelphia, J. Y. Huber co.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation



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conscience quietly puts outa line of shorts in the stock in question at theruling high prices. At the next directors meet-ing of bank No. i he tells his fellow-directorsthat he hears rumors affecting Mr. Speculatorscredit, that he is overloaded with the stock of theroad in question, and suggests to the presidentthat it would be prudent to invite Mr. Speculatorto return the money he had borrowed and takeaway his stocks. Possibly he causes similar ac-tion to be taken by the other bank of which heis a director. Mr. Speculator, so unexpectedlycalled upon to return very large sums of money,is embarrassed. He is obliged to go into themarket and sell a large amount of the stock inquestion. The price falls sharply in consequenceand the director covers his shorts at a handsomeprofit. It is doubtless true that a majority ofbank directors are above this sort of thing; butthere are bank directors, and not a few of themeither, who contrive to turn their official positionsto their personal profit.
Text Appearing After Image:
CHAPTER XX. OUR CITIES. A GREAT city is a great sore—a sore whichnever can be cured... The greater the city, the greater the sore. It necessarily follows that New York, beingthe greatest city in the Union, is the vilest soreon our body politic. If any one doubts it, let him live in New Yorkawhile and keep his eyes and ears open. The trouble about great cities is not that theyhave any impetus or influence especially theirown, but that every one, from the vilest all theway up to the best, is compelled by circum-stances of city life to often conduct his own dailywalk and conversation on lines which are notentirely natural, and which never can be made so. It would be useless to deny that in every largecity may be found a number of the best men andwomen that humanity has been able to evolve.In the great cities are found many of our wiseststatesmen, our greatest theologians, our bestbusiness men, and a host of lesser, but perhapsnot less important individuals, whose influence 31 481 482 M

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1892
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Library of Congress
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