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Massine, Goncharova, Larionov, Stravinsky and Bakst

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Massine, Goncharova, Larionov, Stravinsky and Bakst

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Massine, Goncharova, Larionov, Stravinsky and Bakst in Ouchy, 1915

Natalia Goncharova (1881–1962) was a Russian avant-garde artist who played a significant role in the development of modern art in the early 20th century. She was a painter, set designer, costume designer, illustrator, and writer. Goncharova was born in Tula, Russia, and studied at the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture. She was part of the Russian avant-garde movement, which aimed to break away from traditional artistic conventions and explore new forms of expression. Goncharova's early works were influenced by Russian folk art and icon painting, but she later developed her own style that combined elements of Cubism, Futurism, and Primitivism. Her paintings were characterized by bold colors, geometric shapes, and dynamic compositions. In addition to painting, Goncharova also designed sets and costumes for ballets and theatrical productions. She collaborated with the Ballets Russes and worked on productions such as Le Coq d'Or and Les Noces. Goncharova's work was exhibited in major art exhibitions in Russia and Europe, including the famous 1913 Armory Show in New York City. She was also a member of several avant-garde groups, including the Jack of Diamonds and the Donkey's Tail. After the Russian Revolution, Goncharova continued to work as an artist and designer. She moved to Paris in 1921 and remained there for the rest of her life. In the 1930s, she turned to more traditional forms of art, such as portraiture and still life. Today, Goncharova is recognized as one of the most important female artists of the 20th century. Her work has been exhibited in major museums around the world, including the Tate Modern in London and the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

Mikhail Larionov was a Russian avant-garde artist who played a significant role in the development of modern art in Russia. He was born on 3 June 1881 in the city of Tiraspol, now part of Moldova. He studied at the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture, where he met his future wife and collaborator, Natalia Goncharova. Larionov's early work was influenced by the Impressionists and Post-Impressionists, but he soon became interested in the avant-garde movements that were emerging in Europe at the time. In 1905, he and Goncharova founded the avant-garde movement known as Neo-Primitivism, which sought to incorporate elements of traditional Russian folk art into modern art. In 1910, Larionov and Goncharova moved to Paris, where they became part of an artistic community that included Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque and Henri Matisse. They also began to experiment with other avant-garde styles, including Cubism and Futurism. During the First World War, Larionov returned to Russia and became involved in the revolutionary movement. He created propaganda posters and organised exhibitions promoting the ideals of the new Soviet state. However, he soon became disillusioned with the Soviet regime and was forced to flee the country in 1922. Larionov spent the rest of his life in Paris, where he continued to produce art and exhibit his work. He died on 10 May 1964 at the age of 82. Today, Larionov is recognised as one of the most important figures in the development of modern art in Russia. His work continues to inspire artists all over the world.

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1915
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Larionov exhibition
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