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Metropolitan Opera House Reunion of the Pioneers and Friends of Woman's Progress on Elizabeth Cady Stanton's Eightieth Birthday

Metropolitan Opera House Reunion of the Pioneers and Friends of Woman's Progress on Elizabeth Cady Stanton's Eightieth Birthday

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description

Summary

Speakers highlight women's progress in religion, education, philanthropy, art, medicine, suffrage

The Metropolitan Opera was founded in 1883, with its first opera house built on Broadway and 39th Street by a group of wealthy businessmen who wanted their own theater. In the company’s early years, the management changed course several times, first performing everything in Italian (even Carmen and Lohengrin), then everything in German (even Aida and Faust), before finally settling into a policy of performing most works in their original language, with some notable exceptions. The Metropolitan Opera has always engaged many of the world’s most important artists: Christine Nilsson, Marcella Sembrich, Lilli Lehmann, Nellie Melba, Emma Calvé, De Reszke brothers, Jean and Edouard, Emma Eames, Lillian Nordica, Enrico Caruso, Geraldine Farrar, Rosa Ponselle, Lawrence Tibbett and more. Some of the great conductors have helped shape the Met: Anton Seidl, Arturo Toscanini, Gustav Mahler, Artur Bodanzky, Bruno Walter, George Szell, Fritz Reiner, and Dimitri Mitropoulos.

date_range

Date

01/01/1895
place

Location

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Source

Library of Congress
copyright

Copyright info

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