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[ Mai Zetterling on the phone and Danny Kaye - scene from "Knock on Wood"]

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[ Mai Zetterling on the phone and Danny Kaye - scene from "Knock on Wood"]

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Production photograph from the film "Knock on Wood." (General)

The Library of Congress provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes and makes no warranty with regard to their use for other purposes. The written permission of the copyright owners and/or other rights holders (such as holders of publicity and/or privacy rights) is required for distribution, reproduction, or other use of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use or other statutory exemptions. There may be content that is protected as "works for hire" (copyright may be held by the party that commissioned the original work) and/or under the copyright or neighboring-rights laws of other nations.

Responsibility for making an independent legal assessment of an item and securing any necessary permissions ultimately rests with persons desiring to use the item. Users should consult the bibliographic information that accompanies each item for specific information. This catalog data provides the details known to the Library of Congress regarding the corresponding items and may assist users in making independent assessments of the legal status of these items as related to their desired uses. Items included here with the permission of the rights holders are indicated as such in the bibliographic record for each item.

While every effort has been made to obtain permission to use these songs or portions of these songs, in some cases, the rights' owner may have only granted permission to use a portion of the material online. In those cases, only thirty-second excerpts of sound recordings and one or two pages of print or manuscript materials are used. photograph related to American actor Danny Kaye,. Danny Kaye was an American actor, singer, dancer, and comedian. He was born on January 18, 1911, in Brooklyn, New York, and died on March 3, 1987, in Los Angeles, California. Kaye was known for his energetic and boisterous comedic performances, as well as his versatility as an actor, appearing in numerous films, television shows, and stage productions throughout his career.

Some of his most notable films include "The Kid from Brooklyn" (1946), "White Christmas" (1954), and "The Court Jester" (1956). Kaye was also a successful recording artist and appeared in several television specials, including "Danny Kaye's Crazy House," which aired on NBC in 1955.

In addition to his entertainment career, Kaye was also a philanthropist and humanitarian, using his fame to support various charitable causes and organizations. He was awarded the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in 1982, in recognition of his contributions to the humanitarian community. - Picryl description

The Library of Congress provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes and makes no warranty with regard to their use for other purposes. The written permission of the copyright owners and/or other rights holders (such as holders of publicity and/or privacy rights) is required for distribution, reproduction, or other use of protected items beyond that allowed by fair use or other statutory exemptions. There may be content that is protected as "works for hire" (copyright may be held by the party that commissioned the original work) and/or under the copyright or neighboring-rights laws of other nations.

Responsibility for making an independent legal assessment of an item and securing any necessary permissions ultimately rests with persons desiring to use the item. Users should consult the bibliographic information that accompanies each item for specific information. This catalog data provides the details known to the Library of Congress regarding the corresponding items and may assist users in making independent assessments of the legal status of these items as related to their desired uses. Items included here with the permission of the rights holders are indicated as such in the bibliographic record for each item.

While every effort has been made to obtain permission to use these songs or portions of these songs, in some cases, the rights' owner may have only granted permission to use a portion of the material online. In those cases, only thirty-second excerpts of sound recordings and one or two pages of print or manuscript materials are used. photograph related to American actor Danny Kaye,. Danny Kaye was an American actor, singer, dancer, and comedian.

The invention of the telephone still remains a confusing morass of claims and counterclaims, which were not clarified by the huge mass of lawsuits to resolve the patent claims of commercial competitors. The Bell and Edison patents, however, dominated telephone technology and were upheld by court decisions in the United States. Bell has most often been credited as the inventor of the first practical telephone. Alexander Graham Bell was the first to patent the telephone as an "apparatus for transmitting vocal or other sounds telegraphically". The telephone exchange was an idea of the Hungarian engineer Tivadar Puskás (1844 - 1893) in 1876, while he was working for Thomas Edison on a telegraph exchange. Before the invention of the telephone switchboard, pairs of telephones were connected directly with each other, practically functioned as an intercom. Although telephones devices were in use before the invention of the telephone exchange, their success and economical operation would have been impossible with the schema and structure of the contemporary telegraph systems. A telephone exchange was operated manually by operators, or automatically by machine switching. It interconnects individual phone lines to make calls between them. The first commercial telephone exchange was opened at New Haven, Connecticut, with 21 subscribers on 28 January 1878, in a storefront of the Boardman Building in New Haven, Connecticut. George W. Coy designed and built the world's first switchboard for commercial use. The District Telephone Company of New Haven went into operation with only twenty-one subscribers, who paid $1.50 per month, a one-night price for a room in a city-center hotel. Coy was inspired by Alexander Graham Bell's lecture at the Skiff Opera House in New Haven on 27 April 1877. In Bell's lecture, during which a three-way telephone connection with Hartford and Middletown, Connecticut, was demonstrated, he first discussed the idea of a telephone exchange for the conduct of business and trade.

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01/01/1953
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Library of Congress
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