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After landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility aboard T-38 jet aircraft, STS-99 Mission Specialists (from left) Gerhard Thiele of Germany and Mamoru Mohri of Japan are greeted by Dave King, director of Shuttle Operations. Behind Mohri can be seen Commander Kevin Kregel and Mission Specialist Janice Voss. The crew, which includes Pilot Dom gorie and Mission Specialist Janet Kavandi, are ready to prepare for the second launch attempt of Endeavour Feb. 11 at 12:30 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. The earlier launch scheduled for Jan. 31 was scrubbed due to poor weather and a faulty Enhanced Master Events Controller in the orbiter's aft compartment. Over the next few days, the crew will review mission procedures, conduct test flights in the Shuttle Training Aircraft and undergo routine preflight medical exams. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Landing is expected at KSC on Feb. 22 at 4:36 p.m. EST KSC00pp0171

After landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility aboard T-38 jet aircraft, STS-99 Mission Specialists (from left) Gerhard Thiele of Germany and Mamoru Mohri of Japan are greeted by Dave King, director of Shuttle Operations. Behind Mohri can be seen Commander Kevin Kregel and Mission Specialist Janice Voss. The crew, which includes Pilot Dom gorie and Mission Specialist Janet Kavandi, are ready to prepare for the second launch attempt of Endeavour Feb. 11 at 12:30 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. The earlier launch scheduled for Jan. 31 was scrubbed due to poor weather and a faulty Enhanced Master Events Controller in the orbiter's aft compartment. Over the next few days, the crew will review mission procedures, conduct test flights in the Shuttle Training Aircraft and undergo routine preflight medical exams. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Landing is expected at KSC on Feb. 22 at 4:36 p.m. EST KSC00pp0171

 
 
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After landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility aboard T-38 jet aircraft, STS-99 Mission Specialists (from left) Gerhard Thiele of Germany and Mamoru Mohri of Japan are greeted by Dave King, director of Shuttle Operations. Behind Mohri can be seen Commander Kevin Kregel and Mission Specialist Janice Voss. The crew, which includes Pilot Dom gorie and Mission Specialist Janet Kavandi, are ready to prepare for the second launch attempt of Endeavour Feb. 11 at 12:30 p.m. EST from Launch Pad 39A. The earlier launch scheduled for Jan. 31 was scrubbed due to poor weather and a faulty Enhanced Master Events Controller in the orbiter's aft compartment. Over the next few days, the crew will review mission procedures, conduct test flights in the Shuttle Training Aircraft and undergo routine preflight medical exams. STS-99 is the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, which will produce unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's surface. The result of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission could be close to 1 trillion measurements of the Earth's topography. Landing is expected at KSC on Feb. 22 at 4:36 p.m. EST

The Space Shuttle program was the United States government's manned launch vehicle program from 1981 to 2011, administered by NASA and officially beginning in 1972. The Space Shuttle system—composed of an orbiter launched with two reusable solid rocket boosters and a disposable external fuel tank— carried up to eight astronauts and up to 50,000 lb (23,000 kg) of payload into low Earth orbit (LEO). When its mission was complete, the orbiter would re-enter the Earth's atmosphere and lands as a glider. Although the concept had been explored since the late 1960s, the program formally commenced in 1972 and was the focus of NASA's manned operations after the final Apollo and Skylab flights in the mid-1970s. It started with the launch of the first shuttle Columbia on April 12, 1981, on STS-1. and finished with its last mission, STS-135 flown by Atlantis, in July 2011.

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07/02/2000
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Kennedy Space Center, FL
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NASA
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