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Dirt flies during a ground-breaking ceremony to kick off Astrotech Space Operations' construction of a new satellite preparation facility to support the Delta IV, Boeing's winning entrant in the Air Force Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) Program. Wielding shovels are (from left to right) Tom Alexico; Chet Lee, chairman, Astrotech Space Operations; Gen. Forrest McCartney, vice president, Launch Operations, Lockheed Martin; Richard Murphy, director, Delta Launch Operations, The Boeing Company; Keith Wendt; Toby Voltz; Loren Shriver, deputy director, Launch & Payload Processing, Kennedy Space Center; Truman Scarborough, Brevard County commissioner; U.S. Representative 15th Congressional District David Weldon; Ron Swank; and watching the action at right is George Baker, president, Astrotech Space Operations. Astrotech is located in Titusville, Fla. It is a wholly owned subsidiary of SPACEHAB, Inc., and has been awarded a 10-year contract to provide payload processing services for The Boeing Company. The facility will enable Astrotech to support the full range of satellite sizes planned for launch aboard Delta II, III and IV launch vehicles, as well as the Atlas V, Lockheed Martin's entrant in the EELV Program. The Atlas V will be used to launch satellites for government, including NASA, and commercial customers KSC-99pp1295
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The booster segments for the Ares I-X test rocket were delivered to NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida by the Florida East Coast Railroad and the NASA Railroad.  Accompanying the train on its route from Jacksonville, Fla., were NASA and ATK officials.  Standing here, from left, are ATK Ares I Flight Tests Program Director Joe  Oliva, ATK Ares I-X Florida Program Manager Russ Page, NASA Ares Program Manager Steve Cook, ATK Deputy Site Director in Florida Ted Shaffner, NASA KSC Ares I-X Deputy Mission Manager Jon Cowart, ATK Vice President of Space Launch Propulson Cary Ralston, ATK Ares I First Stage program Director Fred Brasfield, ATK Vice President Space Launch Systems Charlie Precourt, ATK Ares I Flight Tests Deputy Program Director Kathy Philpot, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Reusable Solid Rocket Booster Integration Lead Roy Worthy, ATK Florida Site Director Bob Herman, NASA Res First Stage Project Manager Alex Priskos and NASA KSC Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach.  The four reusable motor segments and the nozzle exit cone, manufactured by the Ares I first-stage prime contractor Alliant Techsystems Inc., or ATK, departed Utah March 12 on the seven-day, cross-country trip to Florida.  The segments will be delivered to the  Rotation, Processing and Surge Facility for final processing and integration. The booster used for the Ares I-X launch is being modified by adding new forward structures and a fifth segment simulator. The motor is the final hardware needed for the rocket's upcoming test flight this summer. The stacking operations are scheduled to begin in the Vehicle Assembly Building in April.   Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-2211

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – The booster segments for the Ares I-X test rocket were delivered to NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida by the Florida East Coast Railroad and the NASA Railroad. Accompanying the train on its route from Jacksonville, Fla., were NASA and ATK officials. Standing here, from left, are ATK Ares I Flight Tests Program Director Joe Oliva, ATK Ares I-X Florida Program Manager Russ Page, NASA Ares Program Manager Steve Cook, ATK Deputy Site Director in Florida Ted Shaffner, NASA KSC Ares I-X Deputy Mission Manager Jon Cowart, ATK Vice President of Space Launch Propulson Cary Ralston, ATK Ares I First Stage program Director Fred Brasfield, ATK Vice President Space Launch Systems Charlie Precourt, ATK Ares I Flight Tests Deputy Program Director Kathy Philpot, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Reusable Solid Rocket Booster Integration Lead Roy Worthy, ATK Florida Site Director Bob Herman, NASA Res First Stage Project Manager Alex Priskos and NASA KSC Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach. The four reusable motor segments and the nozzle exit cone, manufactured by the Ares I first-stage prime contractor Alliant Techsystems Inc., or ATK, departed Utah March 12 on the seven-day, cross-country trip to Florida. The segments will be delivered to the Rotation, Processing and Surge Facility for final processing and integration. The booster used for the Ares I-X launch is being modified by adding new forward structures and a fifth segment simulator. The motor is the final hardware needed for the rocket's upcoming test flight this summer. The stacking operations are scheduled to begin in the Vehicle Assembly Building in April. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-2009-2211

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) is positioned in the parking area of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. In the specially configured aircraft, STS-115 Commander Brent Jett and Pilot Christopher Ferguson practiced landing the shuttle this morning. The space shuttle's Mate-Demate Device is seen in the background. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 12:29 p.m. Sept. 6. Mission managers cancelled Atlantis' first launch campaign due to a lightning strike at the pad and the passage of Tropical Storm Ernesto along Florida's east coast. The mission will deliver and install the 17-and-a-half-ton P3/P4 truss segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the orbital outpost. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. STS-115 is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2034

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - A Shuttle Training Aircraft (STA) is positioned in the parking area of KSC's Shuttle Landing Facility. In the specially configured aircraft, STS-115 Commander Brent Jett and Pilot Christopher Ferguson practiced landing the shuttle this morning. The space shuttle's Mate-Demate Device is seen in the background. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 12:29 p.m. Sept. 6. Mission managers cancelled Atlantis' first launch campaign due to a lightning strike at the pad and the passage of Tropical Storm Ernesto along Florida's east coast. The mission will deliver and install the 17-and-a-half-ton P3/P4 truss segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the orbital outpost. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. STS-115 is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2034

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the early morning hours on NASA Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility, the Shuttle Training Aircraft taxis onto the runway. In the specially configured aircraft, STS-115 Commander Brent Jett and Pilot Christopher Ferguson are practicing landing the shuttle. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 12:29 p.m. Sept. 6. Mission managers cancelled Atlantis' first launch campaign due to a lightning strike at the pad and the passage of Tropical Storm Ernesto along Florida's east coast. The mission will deliver and install the 17-and-a-half-ton P3/P4 truss segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the orbital outpost. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. STS-115 is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2030

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the early morning hours on NASA Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility, the Shuttle Training Aircraft taxis onto the runway. In the specially configured aircraft, STS-115 Commander Brent Jett and Pilot Christopher Ferguson are practicing landing the shuttle. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 12:29 p.m. Sept. 6. Mission managers cancelled Atlantis' first launch campaign due to a lightning strike at the pad and the passage of Tropical Storm Ernesto along Florida's east coast. The mission will deliver and install the 17-and-a-half-ton P3/P4 truss segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the orbital outpost. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. STS-115 is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2030

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the early morning hours on NASA Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility, the Shuttle Training Aircraft taxis onto the runway. In the specially configured aircraft, STS-115 Commander Brent Jett and Pilot Christopher Ferguson are practicing landing the shuttle. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 12:29 p.m. Sept. 6. Mission managers cancelled Atlantis' first launch campaign due to a lightning strike at the pad and the passage of Tropical Storm Ernesto along Florida's east coast. The mission will deliver and install the 17-and-a-half-ton P3/P4 truss segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the orbital outpost. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. STS-115 is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2031

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the early morning hours on NASA Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility, the Shuttle Training Aircraft taxis onto the runway. In the specially configured aircraft, STS-115 Commander Brent Jett and Pilot Christopher Ferguson are practicing landing the shuttle. STA practice is part of launch preparations. The STA is a Grumman American Aviation-built Gulf Stream II jet that was modified to simulate an orbiter’s cockpit, motion and visual cues, and handling qualities. In flight, the STA duplicates the orbiter’s atmospheric descent trajectory from approximately 35,000 feet altitude to landing on a runway. Because the orbiter is unpowered during re-entry and landing, its high-speed glide must be perfectly executed the first time. Mission STS-115 is scheduled to lift off about 12:29 p.m. Sept. 6. Mission managers cancelled Atlantis' first launch campaign due to a lightning strike at the pad and the passage of Tropical Storm Ernesto along Florida's east coast. The mission will deliver and install the 17-and-a-half-ton P3/P4 truss segment to the port side of the integrated truss system on the orbital outpost. The truss includes a new set of photovoltaic solar arrays. When unfurled to their full length of 240 feet, the arrays will provide additional power for the station in preparation for the delivery of international science modules over the next two years. STS-115 is expected to last 11 days and includes three scheduled spacewalks. Photo credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett KSC-06pd2031

Dirt flies during a ground-breaking ceremony to kick off Astrotech Space Operations' construction of a new satellite preparation facility to support the Delta IV, Boeing's winning entrant in the Air Force Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) Program. Wielding shovels are (from left to right) Tom Alexico; Chet Lee, chairman, Astrotech Space Operations; Gen. Forrest McCartney, vice president, Launch Operations, Lockheed Martin; Richard Murphy, director, Delta Launch Operations, The Boeing Company; Keith Wendt; Toby Voltz; Loren Shriver, deputy director, Launch & Payload Processing, Kennedy Space Center; Truman Scarborough, Brevard County commissioner; U.S. Representative 15th Congressional District David Weldon; Ron Swank; and watching the action at right is George Baker, president, Astrotech Space Operations. Astrotech is located in Titusville, Fla. It is a wholly owned subsidiary of SPACEHAB, Inc., and has been awarded a 10-year contract to provide payload processing services for The Boeing Company. The facility will enable Astrotech to support the full range of satellite sizes planned for launch aboard Delta II, III and IV launch vehicles, as well as the Atlas V, Lockheed Martin's entrant in the EELV Program. The Atlas V will be used to launch satellites for government, including NASA, and commercial customers KSC-99pp1295

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Dirt flies during a ground-breaking ceremony to kick off Astrotech Space Operations' construction of a new satellite preparation facility to support the Delta IV, Boeing's winning entrant in the Air Force Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) Program. Wielding shovels are (from left to right) Tom Alexico; Chet Lee, chairman, Astrotech Space Operations; Gen. Forrest McCartney, vice president, Launch Operations, Lockheed Martin; Richard Murphy, director, Delta Launch Operations, The Boeing Company; Keith Wendt; Toby Voltz; Loren Shriver, deputy director, Launch & Payload Processing, Kennedy Space Center; Truman Scarborough, Brevard County commissioner; U.S. Representative 15th Congressional District David Weldon; Ron Swank; and watching the action at right is George Baker, president, Astrotech Space Operations. Astrotech is located in Titusville, Fla. It is a wholly owned subsidiary of SPACEHAB, Inc., and has been awarded a 10-year contract to provide payload processing services for The Boeing Company. The facility will enable Astrotech to support the full range of satellite sizes planned for launch aboard Delta II, III and IV launch vehicles, as well as the Atlas V, Lockheed Martin's entrant in the EELV Program. The Atlas V will be used to launch satellites for government, including NASA, and commercial customers

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12/11/1999
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Kennedy Space Center, FL
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NASA
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