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At Dryden Flight Research Center, Calif., KSC technician James Niehoff Jr. (left) helps attach the wing of the modified X-34, known as A-1A. Niehoff is one of eight NASA engineering technicians from KSC's Engineering Prototype Lab who have assisted Orbital Sciences Corporation and Dryden in the complex process of converting the X-34 A-1 vehicle from captive carry status to unpowered flight status, the A-1A. The other KSC technicians are Kevin Boughner, Roger Cartier, Mike Dininny, Mike Lane, Jerry Moscoso, David Rowell and Bryan Taylor. The X-34 is 58.3 feet long, 27.7 feet wide from wing tip to wing tip, and 11.5 feet tall from the bottom of the fuselage to the top of the tail. The autonomously operated technology demonstrator will be air-launched from an L-1011 airplane and should be capable of flying eight times the speed of sound, reaching an altitude of 250,000 feet. The X-34 Project is managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala KSC-99pp1274

At Dryden Flight Research Center, Calif., KSC technician James Niehoff Jr. (left) helps attach the wing of the modified X-34, known as A-1A. Niehoff is one of eight NASA engineering technicians from KSC's Engineering Prototype Lab who have assisted Orbital Sciences Corporation and Dryden in the complex process of converting the X-34 A-1 vehicle from captive carry status to unpowered flight status, the A-1A. The other KSC technicians are Kevin Boughner, Roger Cartier, Mike Dininny, Mike Lane, Jerry Moscoso, David Rowell and Bryan Taylor. The X-34 is 58.3 feet long, 27.7 feet wide from wing tip to wing tip, and 11.5 feet tall from the bottom of the fuselage to the top of the tail. The autonomously operated technology demonstrator will be air-launched from an L-1011 airplane and should be capable of flying eight times the speed of sound, reaching an altitude of 250,000 feet. The X-34 Project is managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala KSC-99pp1274

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At Dryden Flight Research Center, Calif., KSC technician James Niehoff Jr. (left) helps attach the wing of the modified X-34, known as A-1A. Niehoff is one of eight NASA engineering technicians from KSC's Engineering Prototype Lab who have assisted Orbital Sciences Corporation and Dryden in the complex process of converting the X-34 A-1 vehicle from captive carry status to unpowered flight status, the A-1A. The other KSC technicians are Kevin Boughner, Roger Cartier, Mike Dininny, Mike Lane, Jerry Moscoso, David Rowell and Bryan Taylor. The X-34 is 58.3 feet long, 27.7 feet wide from wing tip to wing tip, and 11.5 feet tall from the bottom of the fuselage to the top of the tail. The autonomously operated technology demonstrator will be air-launched from an L-1011 airplane and should be capable of flying eight times the speed of sound, reaching an altitude of 250,000 feet. The X-34 Project is managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala

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01/11/1999
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Kennedy Space Center, FL
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NASA
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Public Domain Dedication (CC0)

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