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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At a women's forum about "Past, Present and Future of Space," held in the Apollo/Saturn V Center, guests line the stage. From left, they are Marta Bohn-Meyer, the first woman to pilot an SR-71; astronauts Ellen Ochoa, Ken Cockrell, Joan Higginbotham, and Yvonne Cagle; former astronaut Sally Ride, the first American woman to fly in space; and Jennifer Harris, the Mars 2001 Operations System Development Manager at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The forum included a welcome by Center Director Roy Bridges and remarks by Donna Shalala, secretary of Department of Health and Human Services. The attendees are planning to view the launch of STS-93 at the Banana Creek viewing site. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. Liftoff is scheduled for July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT KSC-99pp0903

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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At a women's forum about "Past, Present and Future of Space," held in the Apollo/Saturn V Center, guests line the stage. From left, they are Marta Bohn-Meyer, the first woman to pilot an SR-71; astronauts Ellen Ochoa, Ken Cockrell, Joan Higginbotham, and Yvonne Cagle; former astronaut Sally Ride, the first American woman to fly in space; and Jennifer Harris, the Mars 2001 Operations System Development Manager at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The forum included a welcome by Center Director Roy Bridges and remarks by Donna Shalala, secretary of Department of Health and Human Services. The attendees are planning to view the launch of STS-93 at the Banana Creek viewing site. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. Liftoff is scheduled for July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT KSC-99pp0903

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KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- At a women's forum about "Past, Present and Future of Space," held in the Apollo/Saturn V Center, guests line the stage. From left, they are Marta Bohn-Meyer, the first woman to pilot an SR-71; astronauts Ellen Ochoa, Ken Cockrell, Joan Higginbotham, and Yvonne Cagle; former astronaut Sally Ride, the first American woman to fly in space; and Jennifer Harris, the Mars 2001 Operations System Development Manager at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The forum included a welcome by Center Director Roy Bridges and remarks by Donna Shalala, secretary of Department of Health and Human Services. The attendees are planning to view the launch of STS-93 at the Banana Creek viewing site. Much attention has been generated over the launch due to Commander Eileen M. Collins, the first woman to serve as commander of a Shuttle mission. The primary payload of the five-day mission is the Chandra X-ray Observatory, which will allow scientists from around the world to study some of the most distant, powerful and dynamic objects in the universe. Liftoff is scheduled for July 20 at 12:36 a.m. EDT

The Space Shuttle program was the United States government's manned launch vehicle program from 1981 to 2011, administered by NASA and officially beginning in 1972. The Space Shuttle system—composed of an orbiter launched with two reusable solid rocket boosters and a disposable external fuel tank— carried up to eight astronauts and up to 50,000 lb (23,000 kg) of payload into low Earth orbit (LEO). When its mission was complete, the orbiter would re-enter the Earth's atmosphere and lands as a glider. Although the concept had been explored since the late 1960s, the program formally commenced in 1972 and was the focus of NASA's manned operations after the final Apollo and Skylab flights in the mid-1970s. It started with the launch of the first shuttle Columbia on April 12, 1981, on STS-1. and finished with its last mission, STS-135 flown by Atlantis, in July 2011.

Marta Bohn-Meyer was born in Amityville, New York. Marta Bohn-Meyer served as chief engineer of the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. Bohn-Meyer was involved in a variety of research projects at NASA — she was the first female crewmember assigned to the Lockheed SR-71, serving as navigator during studies of aerodynamics and propulsion that used the SR-71 as a testbed. She was also project manager in a study of advanced laminar flow wing design using the General Dynamics F-16XL aircraft. Bohn-Meyer was an accomplished Unlimited aerobatic pilot, and was twice a member of the United States Unlimited Aerobatic Team. She also served as Team Manager in 2005. Bohn-Meyer died while practicing for the 2005 U.S. National Aerobatic Championships when the Giles 300 aerobatic aircraft she was piloting crashed in Yukon, Oklahoma, near the Clarence E. Page Municipal Airport. The cause of the crash was deemed to be from catastrophic failure of the front hinge of the canopy - which apparently incapacitated her and led to the crash. Her husband was Robert R. Meyer, Jr., a project manager and flight test engineer at Dryden. Bohn-Meyer was a 1979 graduate from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, N.Y. At that time she met her husband, Bob Meyer, during an internship at NASA. In addition to excelling in her aerospace career, Bohn-Meyer served as a role model to young girls interested in technical career fields. She could often be found in classrooms encouraging young women to explore career fields that have so long been dominated by men.

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19/07/1999
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NASA
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