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Journal of a second voyage for the discovery of a north-west passage from the Atlantic to the Pacific - performed in the years 1821-22-23, in His Majesty's ships Fury and Hecla, under the orders of (14801450253)

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Journal of a second voyage for the discovery of a north-west passage from the Atlantic to the Pacific - performed in the years 1821-22-23, in His Majesty's ships Fury and Hecla, under the orders of (14801450253)

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Identifier: Journalsecondvo00Parr (find matches)
Title: Journal of a second voyage for the discovery of a north-west passage from the Atlantic to the Pacific : performed in the years 1821-22-23, in His Majesty's ships Fury and Hecla, under the orders of Captain William Edward Parry : illustrated by numerous plates
Year: 1824 (1820s)
Authors: Parry, William Edward, Sir, 1790-1855 Lyon, G. F. (George Francis), 1795-1832, ill Finden, Edward Francis, 1791-1857, engraver Melville, Robert Saunders Dundas, Viscount, 1771-1851, dedicatee
Subjects: Parry, William Edward, Sir, 1790-1855 Fury (Ship) Hecla (Ship) Natural history Eskimos Inuit
Publisher: London : John Murray
Contributing Library: Smithsonian Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library



Text Appearing Before Image:
him out.The neitiek is the only seal killed in this manner and, being the smallest, isheld, while struggling, either simply by hand, or by putting the line rounda spear with the point stuck into the ice. For the oguke, the line is passedround the mans leg or arm ; and for a walrus, round his body, his feet beingat the same time firmly set against a hummock of ice, in which position thesepeople can from habit hold against a very heavy strain. Boys of fourteen orfifteen years of age consider themselves equal to the killing of a neitiek, butit requires a full-grown person to master either of the larger animals. Sun, 17. On the 17th, a number of the Esquimaux coming before the church service,we gave them to understand, by the sun, that none could be admitted beforenoon, when they quietly remained outside the ships till divine service had beenperformed. We then endeavoured to explain to Iligluik that every seventhday they must not come to the ships, for, without any intention of offending,
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1824
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