PICRYL
PICRYLThe World's Largest Public Domain Source
  • homeHome
  • searchSearch
  • photo_albumStories
  • collectionsCollections
  • infoAbout
  • star_rateUpgrade
  • account_boxLogin
Iron-Nickel Meteorite Zapped by Mars Rover Laser

Iron-Nickel Meteorite Zapped by Mars Rover Laser

  • save_altThumbnail200x200
  • save_altSmall640x631
  • save_altOriginal640x631
  • photo_size_select_largeUpscale 2x1280x1262
description

Summary

The dark, golf-ball-size object in this composite, colorized view from the Chemistry and Camera (ChemCam) instrument on NASA's Curiosity Mars rover shows a grid of shiny dots where ChemCam had fired laser pulses used for determining the chemical elements in the target's composition. The analysis confirmed that this object, informally named "Egg Rock," is an iron-nickel meteorite. Iron-nickel meteorites are a common class of space rocks found on Earth, and previous examples have been found on Mars, but Egg Rock is the first on Mars to be examined with a laser-firing spectrometer. The laser pulses on Oct. 30, 2016, induced bursts of glowing gas at the target, and ChemCam's spectrometer read the wavelengths of light from those bursts to gain information about the target's composition. The laser pulses also burned through the dark outer surface, exposing bright interior material. This view combines two images taken later the same day by ChemCam's remote micro-imager (RMI) camera, with color added from an image taken by Curiosity's Mast Camera (Mastcam). A Mastcam image of Egg Rock is at PIA21134. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21133
NASA/JPL-Caltech/LANL/CNES/IRAP/LPGNantes/CNRS/IAS

date_range

Date

02/11/2016
create

Source

NASA
copyright

Copyright info

Exploreiron nickel

Exploreiron nickel meteorite

Explorechemcam