The World's Largest Public Domain Media Search Engine
Havelock Relieves Lucknow - Public domain image related to music prformance, engraving

Similar

Havelock Relieves Lucknow - Public domain image related to music prformance, engraving

description

Summary

"THE RELIEF OF LUCKNOW BY GENERAL HAVELOCK. Revolt of the Native troops at Lucknow May 30th 1857 - The Residency invested by the rebels June 29th - Relieved by General Havelock Septr. 25th, again surrounded Septr. 26th - Finally relived by Sir Colin Campbell, Nov. 17th" Engraving, 1858.Steel engraving from The History of the Indian Mutiny. [1]. Book by Charles Ball.

Lucknow is the capital and largest city of the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. The city has a long and rich history, having been founded in the late 18th century as the capital of the princely state of Awadh. It was a center of cultural and artistic excellence, and became known for its cuisine, poetry, and music. In the 19th and early 20th centuries, Lucknow was a major center of the Indian independence movement, and it played a key role in the country's struggle for independence from British rule. There are a few theories about the origins of the name "Lucknow." One theory is that the name is derived from the Sanskrit word "lakshmana," which means "marksmanship." Another theory is that the name is derived from the Hindi word "lakshman," which means "having the qualities of a hero." It is also possible that the name is derived from the Urdu word "lakhnau," which means "fort of Lakhna," where Lakhna was the name of the chieftain who founded the city. Ultimately, the exact etymology of the name "Lucknow" is not certain. Lucknow played a significant role in the Indian Rebellion of 1857, also known as the Indian Mutiny or the First War of Independence. The rebellion was a major uprising against British rule in India, and it was sparked by a number of grievances, including the annexation of Awadh (the princely state of which Lucknow was the capital) by the British East India Company. During the rebellion, the city of Lucknow was the site of several significant battles and sieges. The most famous of these was the Siege of Lucknow, which took place in 1857 and was a major turning point in the rebellion. The rebellion was eventually put down by the British, but it had a lasting impact on India's struggle for independence and is considered a major event in Indian history.

The British East India Company played a key role in the spread of British influence in India and the development of the British Empire became involved in corruption and exploitation. In the years that followed the Anglo-Sikh wars of 1849, sikh armies were disbanded by the British. During the Mutiny of 1857, the Muslims sought restoration of the rule of Muslim princes and rulers, and the Hindus hoped to put the Maratha rulers back into power. The princes of the two communities had a unity of purpose in putting up a common front against a common enemy, the British. The Indian Rebellion of 1857 was a major uprising in India that took place in 1857-58 against the rule of the British East India Company. The rebellion was a major uprising against British rule in India, and it was sparked by a number of grievances, including the annexation of Awadh (the princely state of which Lucknow was the capital) by the British East India Company. The rebellion began as a mutiny of sepoys (Indian soldiers) of the Company's army against its own officers, on 10 May 1857, in the town of Meerut, and soon escalated into other mutinies and civilian rebellions largely in the upper Gangetic plain and central India, with the major hostilities confined to present-day Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, northern Madhya Pradesh, and the Delhi region. The term "sepoy" is derived from the Persian word sipahi, which means "soldier." Sepoys were recruited from various parts of India and were usually armed with muskets and bayonets. Three-fourths of the sepoys were Hindus, and the rest were Muslims. The company hired British officers and soldiers to command the sepoy regiments. For the most part, these British military men had as little contact with their sepoy troops as possible. The rebellion posed a considerable threat to British power in that region and was contained only with the rebels' defeat in Gwalior on 20 June 1858. According to some estimates, the death toll from the rebellion could be as high as 100,000. However, other estimates put the death toll at around 10,000-20,000, with the majority of deaths occurring on the British side. During the rebellion, several hundreds of British women, and children were murdered all over North India. Many more people were wounded, and there were also significant economic and social impacts as a result of the rebellion. The most famous of these was the Siege of Lucknow, which took place in 1857 and was a major turning point in the rebellion. The rebellion was eventually put down by the British, but it had a lasting impact on India's struggle for independence and is considered a major event in Indian history. After the Rebellion, the British government took control of India from the East India Company and established the British Raj. The British Raj (meaning "rule" in Hindi) was the period of British rule in India from 1858 to 1947. The British Raj was the largest and most enduring British empire, and it played a key role in the development and spread of the British Empire. During the British Raj, India was ruled by a governor-general, who was advised by a council of ministers. The British government also established a system of administration and justice, with British officials and judges serving in India. The British Raj brought significant economic, social, and political changes to India, including the establishment of modern infrastructure and the introduction of Western education and institutions. However, it also faced opposition and resistance from Indians, who sought greater autonomy and independence. The British Raj came to an end in 1947, when India gained independence from British rule.

date_range

Date

1858
place

Location

create

Source

Wikimedia Commons
copyright

Copyright info

public domain

Explore more

1858 engravings
1858 engravings