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Glycerine tooth paste -- Gellé Frères perfumers 6, Avenue de l'Opéra, 6, Paris / J. Chéret.

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Glycerine tooth paste -- Gellé Frères perfumers 6, Avenue de l'Opéra, 6, Paris / J. Chéret.

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Summary

Poster showing a woman holding a toothbrush and a container of toothpaste.

Caption continues: Always used once used - Process of Eug. Devers chemist laureate - Gold medal Paris 1878.
Signed on stone, lower left .

Vintage Advertising Posters

Prior to the introduction of lithography, primary poster printing techniques included the Wood Block technique and the Intaglio technique. Lithography was invented by Alois Senefelder in Germany in 1796, but not utilized until the mid-to-late 1800s until the introduction of “Cheret’s three stone lithographic process.” Three stones were used to create vibrant posters with intense color and texture. The stones used were typically red, yellow or blue, which enabled the artist to produce a poster featuring both graphics and text using any color of the rainbow. The main challenge was to keep the images aligned. This method lent itself to images consisting of large areas of flat color and resulted in the characteristic poster designs of this period. The first “Art Nouveau” poster was made by Chezch artist Alphonse Mucha who worked in Paris. Art Nouveau and Belle Epoque dominated Paris until about 1901. In 1898, a new artist took Paris by storm, who would later be donned the father of modern advertising – Leonetto Cappiello.

Alois Senefelder, the inventor of lithography, introduced the subject of colored lithography in 1818. Printers in other countries, such as France and England, were also started producing color prints. The first American chromolithograph—a portrait of Reverend F. W. P. Greenwood—was created by William Sharp in 1840. Chromolithographs became so popular in American culture that the era has been labeled as "chromo civilization". During the Victorian times, chromolithographs populated children's and fine arts publications, as well as advertising art, in trade cards, labels, and posters. They were also used for advertisements, popular prints, and medical or scientific books.

date_range

Date

01/01/1889
person

Contributors

Chéret, Jules, 1836-1932, artist
create

Source

Library of Congress
copyright

Copyright info

No known restrictions on publication in the U.S. Use elsewhere may be restricted by other countries' laws. For general information see "Copyright and Other Restrictions..." http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/195_copr.html

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