PICRYL
PICRYL

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Cobweb valentine

Cobweb valentine

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description

Summary

The smooth paper is folded into a quarto booklet -- the recto has a fine double border, printed by continuous cuts of wood engraving, in one line each of blue and gold. Within the border is a banner with a bouquet atop, and garlands of flowers draped from each side. The name, Emma, has been penned beneath the banner. In the center, a hand-colored wood engraving of a man, presumably proposing on bended knee, before a woman in bridal attire, has been carefully cut and pasted. Concentric circles, 3 cm. widest diameter, have been carefully cut into the central area, and a fine thread attached to the center. When the thread is gently lifted, the cutwork rises, and reveals the image of a man and woman reading a letter; she is seated, he is looking over her shoulder. This has the characteristics to be American in origin.The Cobweb, also known as Beehive, Bird cage, and Flower cage, was a popular moveable, mechanical device where a top layer is cut into concentric circles, which may be lifted by a thread to reveal an interior, secret image.
Anonymous, American, 19th century
date_range

Date

1847
create

Source

The Metropolitan Museum of Art
copyright

Copyright info

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