PICRYL
PICRYLThe World's Largest Public Domain Source
Range :  4 billion miles from Earth, at 32 degrees to the ecliptic. P-36057C This color image of the Sun, Earth, and Venus is one of the first, and maybe, only images that show are solar system from such a vantage point. The image is a portion of a wide angle image containing the sun and the region of space where the Earth and Venus were at the time, with narrow angle cameras centered on each planet. The wide angle was taken with the cameras darkest filter, a methane absorption band, and the shortest possible exposure, one two-hundredth of a second, to avoid saturating the camera's vidicon tube with scattered sunlight. The sun is not large in the sky, as seen from Voyager's perpective at the edge of the solar system. Yet, it is still 8xs brighter than the brightest star in Earth's sky, Sirius. The image of the sun you see is far larger than  the actual dimension of the solar disk. The result of the brightness is a bright burned out image with multiple reflections from the optics of the camera. The rays around th sun are a diffraction pattern of the calibration lamp which is mounted in front of the  wide angle lens. the 2 narrow angle frames containing the images of the Earth and Venus have been digitally mosaicked into the wide angle image at the appropriate scale. These images were taken through three color filters and recombined to produce the color image. The violet, green, and blue filters used , as well as exposure times of .72,.48, and .72 for Earth, and .36, .24, and .36 for Venus.The images also show long linear streaks resulting from scatering of sulight off parts of the camera and its shade. ARC-1990-AC79-7127

Range : 4 billion miles from Earth, at 32 degrees to the ecliptic. P-36057C This color image of the Sun, Earth, and Venus is one of the first, and maybe, only images that show are solar system from such a vantage point. The image is a portion of a wide angle image containing the sun and the region of space where the Earth and Venus were at the time, with narrow angle cameras centered on each planet. The wide angle was taken with the cameras darkest filter, a methane absorption band, and the shortest possible exposure, one two-hundredth of a second, to avoid saturating the camera's vidicon tube with scattered sunlight. The sun is not large in the sky, as seen from Voyager's perpective at the edge of the solar system. Yet, it is still 8xs brighter than the brightest star in Earth's sky, Sirius. The image of the sun you see is far larger than the actual dimension of the solar disk. The result of the brightness is a bright burned out image with multiple reflections from the optics of the camera. The rays around th sun are a diffraction pattern of the calibration lamp which is mounted in front of the wide angle lens. the 2 narrow angle frames containing the images of the Earth and Venus have been digitally mosaicked into the wide angle image at the appropriate scale. These images were taken through three color filters and recombined to produce the color image. The violet, green, and blue filters used , as well as exposure times of .72,.48, and .72 for Earth, and .36, .24, and .36 for Venus.The images also show long linear streaks resulting from scatering of sulight off parts of the camera and its shade. ARC-1990-AC79-7127

 
 
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Range : 4 billion miles from Earth, at 32 degrees to the ecliptic. P-36057C This color image of the Sun, Earth, and Venus is one of the first, and maybe, only images that show are solar system from such a vantage point. The image is a portion of a wide angle image containing the sun and the region of space where the Earth and Venus were at the time, with narrow angle cameras centered on each planet. The wide angle was taken with the cameras darkest filter, a methane absorption band, and the shortest possible exposure, one two-hundredth of a second, to avoid saturating the camera's vidicon tube with scattered sunlight. The sun is not large in the sky, as seen from Voyager's perpective at the edge of the solar system. Yet, it is still 8xs brighter than the brightest star in Earth's sky, Sirius. The image of the sun you see is far larger than the actual dimension of the solar disk. The result of the brightness is a bright burned out image with multiple reflections from the optics of the camera. The rays around th sun are a diffraction pattern of the calibration lamp which is mounted in front of the wide angle lens. the 2 narrow angle frames containing the images of the Earth and Venus have been digitally mosaicked into the wide angle image at the appropriate scale. These images were taken through three color filters and recombined to produce the color image. The violet, green, and blue filters used , as well as exposure times of .72,.48, and .72 for Earth, and .36, .24, and .36 for Venus.The images also show long linear streaks resulting from scatering of sulight off parts of the camera and its shade.

In 1977, Voyager 1 and 2 started their one-way journey to the end of the solar system and beyond, now traveling a million miles a day. Jimmy Carter was president when NASA launched two probes from Cape Canaveral. Voyager 1 and its twin, Voyager 2, were initially meant to explore Jupiter, Saturn, and their moons. They did that. But then they kept going at a rate of 35,000 miles per hour. Each craft bears an object that is a record, both dubbed the Golden Records. They were the product of Carl Sagan and his team who produced a record that would, if discovered by aliens, represent humanity and "communicate a story of our world to extraterrestrials."

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14/02/1990
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NASA
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